PDA

View Full Version : Any Good Book recomendations?



Aztek_Eagle
10-29-2004, 06:02 PM
I have spend almost a year reading osprey publications, they are good, i read mosly about ww2, but their restriction of 100 pages books sometimes doesnt give the author much space to enter into profund detail in what the book is based about... so any good ww2 books recomendations? of all aspects of ww2, air battles, naval engagesments, tank battles.... ect ect.... well not limited to ww2 periot, i like to read about any war history from the 1900s towards today... so anything good you have read... it would be nice to have a forum area restricted to book recomendations

El Turo
10-29-2004, 06:14 PM
I enjoyed "Fighter Pilot" by Paul Richey, a Hurricane pilot's diary/memoirs from the very early goings of WWII in the Battle of France that were drafted into a book format either during or just after the war. Definately a good read!

Some might recommend Len Deighton's stuff, but to be honest I've never really liked his style nor his sometimes questionable statistics/facts.

One of the best books I've ever read was called something like "The Luftwaffe Diaries" or close to that. A book written JUST after the war that used first hand accounts from both sides and unprecidented access into official documents to recreate individual battles between fighters/bombers and to provide fascinating insight into the inner workings of the war.

Best,

~T.

Chuck_Older
10-29-2004, 06:21 PM
You might like some books by Bob Ballard. He's the guy that found the Titanic.

he also explored many WWII wrecks.

Walter Boyne wrote a good book called "Clash of Wings" which is a good overview of the air war in WWII, but you might be looking for something different

George Loving jr's "Woodbine Red Leader" is a good read, as is Norman "Bud" Fortier's " an Ace of the Eighth"

Jack Ilfrey's book is out, I hear- "Happy Jack's Go Buggy: a Fighter Pilot's story". Mr Ilfrey regretfully died quite recently

My all time favorite book on WWII in the air is "Little Friends: the fighter pilot experience in World War II England" by Kaplan and Saunders, ISBN number 0-394-58434-1. It's a big book, 11" x 11", almost a coffe-table book. But it goes a little in depth on mayt topics instead of keying on one or two. If it can be found, I highly recommend it

tHeBaLrOgRoCkS
10-29-2004, 06:25 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums?q=Y&a=tpc&s=400102&f=23110283&m=796103535&p=1

Couple of good suggestions both fictional and non-fictional in that thread.

Is it time we had a 'Good Read' sticky ?

Atomic_Marten
10-29-2004, 06:35 PM
This thread should be sticky. Book reccomendations and stuff. Every once and while thread like this appears and it is a shame that we have to search whole forum for it...

About books, I do not want to reccomend you Osprey since you say you have take soome time to explore their books. I have ordered myself "Attack of the Airacobras..." by D.Loza. It seems like very detailed book (392pgs.) and a good source for eastern front air warfare.

fabianfred
10-29-2004, 06:49 PM
I wasn't all that interested in PF until I read the following two books

'Pappy' Boyington's... Baa Baa Black Sheep

Thomas G. Miller..... The Cactus Air Force

both great reads..

PlimPlam
10-29-2004, 06:58 PM
I just read Samurai by sakai. Was an outstandingly good read.

LuckyBoy1
10-29-2004, 07:18 PM
The books...

Piece of Cake = unlike the mini=series

Hell In The Pacific = Somewhat like the movie.

Aztek_Eagle
10-29-2004, 08:51 PM
thanks guys, i will definetly look up into the books and authors u mention, hopefully more ppl will join this topic

Tater-SW-
10-29-2004, 09:03 PM
The two First Team books by Lundstrom about Naval VF air ops Dec 1941 to Nov 1942. Best books on that subject, bar none.

tater

Stiglr
10-29-2004, 09:05 PM
Check 'em out, Aztek...

Stiggie's Bookshelf (http://www.naysayers.com/9jg52/books.html)

LStarosta
10-29-2004, 09:18 PM
And of course, who could forget Catch-22?

Though it's more along the lines of political/social/military satire, with a hint of acid trip.

M&M Enterprises anyone?

Aztek_Eagle
10-29-2004, 09:21 PM
thanks..... how safe is it buying from amazon, i have never buy from there, so i better ask... and what other place would be a good place to buy online, used and new books?

wayno7777
10-29-2004, 10:12 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by El Turo:
I enjoyed "Fighter Pilot" by Paul Richey, a Hurricane pilot's diary/memoirs from the very early goings of WWII in the Battle of France that were drafted into a book format either during or just after the war. Definately a good read!

Some might recommend Len Deighton's stuff, but to be honest I've never really liked his style nor his sometimes questionable statistics/facts.

One of the best books I've ever read was called something like "The Luftwaffe Diaries" or close to that. A book written JUST after the war that used first hand accounts from both sides and unprecidented access into official documents to recreate individual battles between fighters/bombers and to provide fascinating insight into the inner workings of the war.

Best,

~T. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I had the Luftwaffe War Diaries and now I can't find it. Fantastic read. Bantam had a series of books by pilots and others from WW2. On Galland, Sakai, Rudel, Tuck, Closterman, Gibson and Bader. Also the V-2 story. The Mammoth Book of Fighter Pilots. The Greatest Aces by Edward H. Sims. Forked-tailed Devil: The P-38 by Martin Caidin. Woodbine Red Leader is good, also.

SKIDRO_79FS
10-29-2004, 10:14 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Chuck_Older:
Jack Ilfrey's book is out, I hear- "Happy Jack's Go Buggy: a Fighter Pilot's story". Mr Ilfrey regretfully died quite recently

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

"Happy Jack's Go Buggy" has been in print since 1998 or 1999 in an expanded edition with more photos and some extra content. It's still available through Shiffer's (the publisher) and on Amazon. Though many think I am biased, I believe it to be one of the best aviation-related autobiographies ever written. Since his death I've been re-reading it and wondering how no one has bought the rights to the story for a movie.

If you want an autographed copy there are still a few available through the P-38 National Association.

A book I recently obtained, and could not put down, was "The Interrogator" by Raymond Tolliver, the biogrpahy of Master Interrogator Hans Scharff who was known for his humane methods of interrogation. I had to get my copy off E-Bay but it was worth it.

MK2aw
10-29-2004, 10:22 PM
Amazon is very safe as it is the world's largest seller of books.

Mk2aw

Aztek_Eagle
10-30-2004, 01:04 PM
rgr that

Anadin
10-30-2004, 02:04 PM
Spitfire on My Tail

True story, Steinhilper talks about his experiences during the Battle of Britain, his missions, victories and also incorporates copies of his letters sent home. What becomes apparent is how the Luftwaffe slowly became demoralised and tired because of the dwindling numbers within their ranks, fatique and channel disease. an essential read for anyone with an interest in the Luftwaffe or Battle of Britain.

Chuck_Older
10-30-2004, 02:07 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by SKIDRO_79FS:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Chuck_Older:
Jack Ilfrey's book is out, I hear- "Happy Jack's Go Buggy: a Fighter Pilot's story". Mr Ilfrey regretfully died quite recently

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

"Happy Jack's Go Buggy" has been in print since 1998 or 1999 in an expanded edition with more photos and some extra content. It's still available through Shiffer's (the publisher) and on Amazon. Though many think I am biased, I believe it to be one of the best aviation-related autobiographies ever written. Since his death I've been re-reading it and wondering how no one has bought the rights to the story for a movie.

If you want an autographed copy there are still a few available through the P-38 National Association.

A book I recently obtained, and could not put down, was "The Interrogator" by Raymond Tolliver, the biogrpahy of Master Interrogator Hans Scharff who was known for his humane methods of interrogation. I had to get my copy off E-Bay but it was worth it. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ah. Was it a second edition or something that just came out? I swear someplace I saw this in the 'new' book section

Bearcat99
10-30-2004, 02:48 PM
In addition to some of the books already posted here I have......

To Fly and Fight... by Bud Anderson
Benjamin O. Davis Jr. American by Benjamin O. Davis

Tuskegees Heroes-Featuring the aviation art of Roy LaGrone by Charlie and Ann Cooper

Black Knights the story of the Tuskegee Airmen by Lynn M. Homan and Thomas Reilly

Lonely Eagles by Dr.Robert A. Rose,

The Mighty Eighth by Gerald Astor

Flyboys by James Bradley

The Tuskegee Airmen-Mutiny at Freeman Field by James C. Warren

Tuskegee Airmen: The Men Who Changed a Nation by Chales E. Francis

Flying Tigers: Claire Chennault and the AVG by Daniel Ford

I liked the one by Bud Fortier... that was pretty good. Lots of P-47 stuff in there if thats your thing. Zero was pretty good too... So was Attack of the Aircobras. I was actually motivated to get that book by IL2.

bolox00
10-30-2004, 03:10 PM
a few more
sigh for a merlin- alex henshaw- spitfire cheif test pilot-very good

messerschmitts over sicily- johannes steinhoff-also v. good

death traps- belton cooper- fantastic account of tank repair in normandy

123-Wulf-JG123
10-30-2004, 03:56 PM
"The Big Show", by Pierre Clostermann; truly a superb book and well worth tracking down. A Free French pilot, flying for the RAF over Europe. Runs from the Battle of France to the end of the war. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0809479621/002-7201354-8193615?v=glance

blairgowrie
10-30-2004, 04:02 PM
I'll second the Big Show by Pierre Closterman. It may well be the best book by a fighter pilot from WW2 bar none.

SKIDRO_79FS
10-30-2004, 04:38 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Chuck_Older:
Ah. Was it a second edition or something that just came out? I swear someplace I saw this in the 'new' book section <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I recently saw a review of the book in an aviation magazine, but as far as I know it is the same version that came out in 1998-99. None the less, kudos to you for having it on your list!

JG52Uther
10-30-2004, 04:51 PM
Stuks Pilot by Hans- Ulrich Rudel,.....Graf and Grislawski,a pair of aces by Bergstrom,.....I flew for the fuhrer by Heinz Knoke,.......Sky Spy by Ray Holmes,.....Shot Down In Flames by Geoffrey Page,......Kamikaze Japans Suicide Gods by Axell and Kase,...The Luftwaffe Bombers' Battle of Britain,by Chris Goss....(just a few to be getting on with http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif)

Aztek_Eagle
10-31-2004, 02:47 PM
bump

WTE_Galway
10-31-2004, 03:42 PM
Panzer Leader

by Generaloberst Heinz Guderian
leader of panzer group II during Barbarossa
Generalinspekteur der Panzertruppen 43
Commander of General Staff 44/45

Guderian was a professional soldier and at odds with Hitler throughout the war being dismissed on numerous occasions for arguing with Hitler then re-instated because no-one else could do his job.

This book is a very unbiased view of WWII and particularly the Eastern Front, Guderian is quite candid about where the German's did well and what they stuffed up.

SkyChimp
10-31-2004, 04:43 PM
I second the nomination for the The First Team and The First Team and the Gaudalcanal Campaign. IMO, there are no other books out there that cover a period of air war in as much depth and detail as these two books.

Zeus-cat
10-31-2004, 05:25 PM
If you like armor, I strongly recommend Belton Cooper's book "Death traps". Mr. Cooper was in the quartermaster corp for the US Army's first division from the Normandy invasion to VE Day He specialized in armor, specifically the Sherman.

He talks a lot about going to a battlefield the day after the battle and deciding which tanks could be salvaged and which ones were scrap. He thought the worst job in the US Army was having to clean out the brains and body parts from the knocked out Shermans so that the tank could be patched, repainted (on the inside), rewired and returned to service. He said no tank that ever had brains splattered inside of it smelled right after that, no matter what they did to it.

The Shermans in the Big Red One had something like a 700% casualty rate from D-Day to VE Day. He has a lot of stories and some strong opinions. Great read imo.

Looking for some torpedo bomber missions to fly? Find 30 missions in my IL-2T torpedo bomber campaign here:

http://www.airwarfare.com/Sims/FB/fb_campaigns.htm

Zeus-cat

Hrannar
10-31-2004, 05:36 PM
I highly recommed this one:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1898697035/qid=1099269320/sr=8-5/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i5_xgl14/104-7443255-7826338?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

Arms1
10-31-2004, 05:53 PM
by far my favorite first person account of the airwar during ww2 is "terror in the starboard seat" i believe by macintosh or mcintosh? first person account of ops by a mossie navigator, i have read many books by former aviators and this is by far the best that hasnt used a ghost writer, story of a yank mossie pilot and his canuck nav on ops as seen by the guy that was along for the ride, both were decorated for thier actions, a good read written by a truly modest hero

PBNA-Boosher
10-31-2004, 06:02 PM
A Dance With Death, by Anne Noggle

WTE_Galway
10-31-2004, 06:54 PM
Amazon have a combined deal on two of the better Midway books around "Incredible Victory" and "miracle at Midway"

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1580800599/ref=pd_sim_b_3/103-0489903-4125433?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance

Chuck_Older
11-01-2004, 04:33 PM
bumping, good thread

ImpStarDuece
11-01-2004, 04:50 PM
'Zero' by Caidin and a pair of Japanese authors, one of which was involved in many of the major battles in the Pacific, the other was one of the designers of the Zero.

Interesting, if occasionally clouded or blinkered, account of the Pacific War from the Japanese perspective. Many insights into the Japanese military character and psyche.