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ivoloos
02-07-2005, 05:14 PM
Students of the Dutch Delft University of Technology are designing a human powered sub to compete in the "8th International Submarine Race"

The design:
http://wasub.oli.tudelft.nl/photo/sub_1.jpg

jeroen-79
02-07-2005, 05:21 PM
Linky (http://wasub.oli.tudelft.nl/)

ivoloos
02-07-2005, 05:24 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by jeroen-79:
http://wasub.oli.tudelft.nl/ <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

OOPS! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Dominicrigg
02-07-2005, 06:17 PM
How long will it run for on 10 humans? Do fatter humans make it run faster?

Also where are they getting the humans from and do they have a liquifier on board or do they liquify them beforehand to cut down on storage space? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

blue_76
02-07-2005, 07:59 PM
as i remember, the first human powered submarine that became operational was during the Civil War in the US. The south was the firt to use such a submarine and they had a successfull mission, they managed to blow up a ship.. only to sink themselves on the way back http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif i can't remember her name, but she had people use their muscle power for propulsion and they all used their arms, not their legs. just imagine.. an iron submarine with a candle for light.. talk about risks.. and yet, they still took it.

hauitsme
02-07-2005, 08:35 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by blue_76:
as i remember, the first human powered submarine that became operational was during the Civil War in the US. The south was the firt to use such a submarine and they had a successfull mission, they managed to blow up a ship.. only to sink themselves on the way back http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif i can't remember her name, but she had people use their muscle power for propulsion and they all used their arms, not their legs. just imagine.. an iron submarine with a candle for light.. talk about risks.. and yet, they still took it. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Here's something to chew on.....
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>But it was only in 1620 that Cornelius van Drebbel, a Dutch inventor, managed to build a submarine. He wrapped a wooden rowboat tightly in waterproofed leather and had air tubes with floats to the surface to provide oxygen. Of course, there were no engines yet, so the oars went through the hull at leather gaskets. He took the first trip with 12 oarsmen in the Thames River - staying submerged for 3 hours.

The first submarine used for military purposes was built in 1776 by David Bushnell (1742-1824) of the US. His "Turtle" was a one-man, wooden submarine powered by hand-turned propellers. It was used during the American Revolution against British warships. The Turtle would approach enemy ships partially submerged to attach explosives to the ships's hull. The Turtle worked well but the explosives did not.

Two rival inventors from the US developed the first true submarines in the 1890s. The US Navy purchased submarines built by John P Holland, while Russia and Japan opted for the designs of Simon Lake. Their submarines used petrol or steam engines for surface cruising and electric motors for underwater travel. They also invented torpedoes which were propelled by small electric motors, thereby introducing one of the most dangerous weapons in the world. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

SailorSteve
02-07-2005, 10:26 PM
The Civil War sub was the CSS H.L. Hunley. She sank a total of three times:

1) On her first test run, killing 6 of her 9 crew

2) On her second test run she sank again, killing all aboard, including her inventor

3) Feb. 17, 1864, she sank the USS Housatonic, then sank herself. Why is still unclear.
http://www.charlestonillustrated.com/hunley/

I was going to mention Cornelius van Drebbel, but Hauitsme got there first. Congratulations.