PDA

View Full Version : Video Card AGPx8 or XPCI?



Bucher1972
12-06-2004, 01:08 PM
This is the question?
Easy answer please?

mroseland
12-06-2004, 01:13 PM
If you have a XPCI board, then get the XPCI card. It's still pretty new technology, so some people may shy away from it until the next revision of the cards and boards come out.

Weather_Man
12-06-2004, 01:15 PM
What's the question? Use what your motherboard has. One or the other. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

If you're asking:
Which is better? PCIe.
Any difference? Not really. Yet.

lbhskier37
12-06-2004, 01:47 PM
if your asking because you want to buy a new motherboard, get the PCI express one because you will be able to upgrade for a lot longer than with an AGP board.

stansdds
12-06-2004, 05:23 PM
If you are planning on building a new computer in the very near future, as I am, AGP is still the most popular slot for graphics cards. PCIe offers a lot of promise, far more than AGP ever will, but there is only one PCIe motherboard for AMD 939 processors and it is $300, easily twice the cost of a comparable AGP motherboard. Also, PCIe graphics cards are very expensive compared to their AGP counterparts. In short, PCIe is likely to be the wave of the future, but today it is rare and expensive.

Fritzofn
12-06-2004, 11:10 PM
AGP 8x is....well, only half the speed of PCIe
but XPCI on the other hand....thats like...4x AGP

james_ander
12-07-2004, 05:21 AM
The problem is that the supply of high end AGP cars just plain sucks. If you can find one, it is often at an inflated price. I get the feeling than graphics cards manufacturers are trying to kill off AGP as fast as possible. Hop I'm wrong.

lbhskier37
12-07-2004, 05:43 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by stansdds:
If you are planning on building a new computer in the very near future, as I am, AGP is still the most popular slot for graphics cards. PCIe offers a lot of promise, far more than AGP ever will, but there is only one PCIe motherboard for AMD 939 processors and it is $300, easily twice the cost of a comparable AGP motherboard. Also, PCIe graphics cards are very expensive compared to their AGP counterparts. In short, PCIe is likely to be the wave of the future, but today it is rare and expensive. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

A patient person would wait a month until more PCIe boards are out and prices are normal. Waiting a month now is going to ad much more than a month to your systems upgradeability. And actually if you look at ATI cards, its easier to find a PCIe version of their high end cards than a AGP one. With Nvidia the PCIe version of the 6600GT is cheaper than the AGP version because the AGP version needs a bridge chip to translate the PCIe native GPU to AGP. From now on all high end graphics cards will be PCIe native (see X850XT) and need an extra bridge chip to go AGP.

james_ander
12-07-2004, 02:18 PM
I'm not at all crazy about PCI-E. It really has nothing to offer the gamer in terms of performance at this point. I'm not happy that it is being forced on us like it is. It would be one thing if it was actually better. People would adopt it for this reason alone.

But...I am getting the impression that AGP is being dropped faster than people expected. I would like to build an AMD system and don't want to be limited when I upgrade my graphics card a year or so from now.

I am waiting a few months to see if:

A. There will be any increase in the availability of high end AGP cards, or:

B. PCI-e based AMD mobos become affordable and reliable.

Since I am doing well with my current system, waiting shouldn't be too hard.

roybaty
12-07-2004, 06:13 PM
I'm holding off on PCI-E as well, I figure it'll be a must in a year, but not now. Plus there are some teething issues from what I've read in regards to drivers and the MB bios, etc.

If you have a lotta cash to burn, and are upgrading/building your whole system you can have a go at PCI-E, otherwise wait a bit.

Weather_Man
12-07-2004, 06:38 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by james_ander:
I'm not at all crazy about PCI-E. It really has nothing to offer the gamer in terms of performance at this point. I'm not happy that it is being forced on us like it is. It would be one thing if it was actually better. People would adopt it for this reason alone.

But...I am getting the impression that AGP is being dropped faster than people expected. I would like to build an AMD system and don't want to be limited when I upgrade my graphics card a year or so from now.

I am waiting a few months to see if:

A. There will be any increase in the availability of high end AGP cards, or:

B. PCI-e based AMD mobos become affordable and reliable.

Since I am doing well with my current system, waiting shouldn't be too hard. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes, it's correct to say there's no difference in games now. But, that has nothing to do with PCIe performance, but due to the fact that games aren't programmed to take advantage of the additional bandwidth. Same is true for 8xAGP for that matter. Games need to work with the least common denominator if they expect to sell in volume.

On paper PCIe absolutely rocks the house. But, since only 1% (or less) of all gamers have this hardware, you can't very well make a game where this is a requirement. It's going to several more years before we even approach 8x bandwidth requirements, let alone 16x.

Now, if everyone would just upgrade like they should, we could have a proper game this new hardware is designed for. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

PCIe is here to stay, there is no doubt about that. There is no reason for the industry not to move to a better technology, as it is doing. Availablity will definately be on the rise next year, along with lower cost for the motherboards.

james_ander
12-09-2004, 02:04 PM
Just another thought on PCI-Express.

If I understand correctly PCI-E graphics cards are no different than the AGP counterparts with the exception of being compatible with a PCI-E socket. Current PCI-E cards are AGP cards with a bridge to a PCI-E male connector. So even if a theoretical game coded for PCI-E was created it would be bottlenecked by the maximum 8x AGP bandwidth that the current "bridged" cards are limited to.

So not only would we have to have games coded for PCI-E, but real PCI-E graphics cards to run them. And in order for it to be worthwhile for software companies to produce these games, almost everyone would have to have this kind of system.

Maybe I'm talking out of my ****, but it sounds like a rotten time to upgrade your computer.

Weather_Man
12-09-2004, 03:32 PM
Only some of the current NV cards are bridged. There are plenty of native PCIe models out. Even so, the performance hit of the bridge is neglible. They still have the benefit PCIe brings with higher bandwidth and two-way serial connections. The only drawback is production costs are higher.

These bridged AGP to PCIe cards will not be around long. All of the new GPUs from now on will be native PCIe. In fact, any future AGP cards will be PCIe designs with a PCIe to AGP bridge.

james_ander
12-09-2004, 03:50 PM
I stand corrected. Sounds worth waiting for.