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View Full Version : B25 Airplane Pulled Out From Lake Murray, South Carolina



marc_hawkins
06-15-2006, 11:39 AM
ran across this and figured some of you guys would be interested....

http://www.abandonedbutnotforgotten.com/b25_airplane_pu...,_south_carolina.htm (http://www.abandonedbutnotforgotten.com/b25_airplane_pulled_out_from_lake_murray,_south_ca rolina.htm)

nice big pics!

danjama
06-15-2006, 11:59 AM
Good Luck to em, that is a Mess!!!

Still, if they offered it to me i wouldnt say no...

PBNA-Boosher
06-15-2006, 12:22 PM
The Discovery Channel did a show on it very recently, It was cool to watch.

justflyin
06-15-2006, 12:47 PM
Neat. I did a little research with the registry number, as I was curious how the plane got there, and found several links. Here's one quote from a site:

"The final day of the airplane is well€"known. After flying out of the Columbia Army Air Base on April 4, 1943, the now€"rare B€"25C Bomber crashed and sank in the man€"made lake during a skip€"bombing training mission. The military crew escaped the aircraft, which had lost power, and brought it to rest upright, with damage to only the right engine. The crew survived and were rescued."

From here: B-25 Salvage (http://www.thecolumbiastar.net/news//2005/0916/Front_Page/001.html)

stansdds
06-16-2006, 05:05 AM
I saw the Discovery Channel show on this and it is one of the very few B-25C's remaining in this world. Even rarer is the Sperry periscope sighted retracting ventral turret and this B-25C still has it in place. I kind of doubt that this one will fly again, but with enough money and time just about anything is possible.

Troll2k
06-16-2006, 04:10 PM
Okay, who stole the guns?

stansdds
06-17-2006, 07:10 AM
The guns may have been removed when the aircraft was assigned to state-side training duty. If they were still on the plane, they would have been the first things removed as a safety precaution.

Jasko76
06-17-2006, 08:58 AM
Wow! It's in pretty decent shape, we should see it fly in a couple of years.

stansdds
06-17-2006, 09:16 AM
See it fly in a couple of years? I doubt it!!! It is likely to take hundreds of thousands of dollars, possibly crack the 1 million mark, and many, many years of stripping it down and rebuilding (with tons of new structural components and likely all of the skin being fabricated from new metal) the entire aircraft. She's bent, twisted, broken, and filled with corrosion. If she flies again, it will take a decade of work.

Jasko76
06-17-2006, 09:32 AM
A couple of years to a decade then. Plus some serious money and hard work. But it can be done, I've seen aircraft in far worse condition being restored to flying condition.

Jagdgeschwader2
06-17-2006, 01:14 PM
Look at how bad this P-61 was and it's getting close to flying now. With donations and volunteer work anything is possible.

Look at the recovery photos. The B-25 is in much better shape.

http://www.maam.org/p61.html

http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/maam-014_low.jpg

http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/jagdgeschwader2s.jpg

Jasko76
06-17-2006, 02:15 PM
Thank you for proofing my point, JG2!

Treetop64
06-17-2006, 02:25 PM
Wow! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

The progress they've made on that P-61 is unbelieveable! That thing is actually going to fly again!

Eagle_361st
06-17-2006, 03:13 PM
Indeed what a find, hopefully someday it could be returned to flying status, but at the very least perhaps it could be brought upto snuff for a static display. As for the P-61 I can't wait to see her in the air, what an amazing story on that bird.

Hashmark13
06-17-2006, 03:40 PM
I watched the program about the B25C on Discovery channel a few weeks ago.

They removed the 50 cal machine guns, they were laying to the side of the aircraft and were in bad shape.

The right engine on the aircraft broke off, the prop came off and sliced through the cabin. You can see above, on the right side of the cabin, a huge gash.

It's going to take a lot of money to fix it, but they're going to.


A while back, I remember they pulled a P38 out of an iceberg. It was frozen solid in it. They had huge machines melt a cavern around it, then brought it up in sections. It was fully restorted and flew at the end of the program.

stansdds
06-18-2006, 07:54 AM
I'm not saying that a full restoration to flight status can't be done, it will simply take far more time and money than most people imagine. Can anything in aviation be done? Sure! Thirty years ago no one expected to see a Me-262 flying around, but there is a group of aviation entrepenuers who have built one brand new, full size Me-262 using modern engines and systems and are building four more. All it takes these days is enough man power, time and money.
http://www.stormbirds.com/

rnzoli
06-18-2006, 12:14 PM
I am wondering: if they have to replace structural elements and replace 90% of the aircraft to make it airworthy again, can we really say that it's the same plane that flies again?

Anyhow, I didn't see any plan to make this fly B25 again, just to restore it for static display. The larger the airplane, the higher to cost to restore it.

woofiedog
06-19-2006, 09:23 AM
Excellent link... it will be interesting to see what becomes of the B-25.

Chuck_Older
06-19-2006, 10:08 AM
Originally posted by rnzoli:
I am wondering: if they have to replace structural elements and replace 90% of the aircraft to make it airworthy again, can we really say that it's the same plane that flies again?

Anyhow, I didn't see any plan to make this fly B25 again, just to restore it for static display. The larger the airplane, the higher to cost to restore it.

There are P-51s flying today that have just a data plate as 'proof' of what the plane is

It's an old problem. Here's a good example:

I'm into old cars. The cars I like are "new" enough to have VINs on them. Take my car for example: a 1970 Buick GS455. I've replaced the engine with one that originally came from a '73 Riviera. I still use that block and crankshaft- everything else in it is new aftermarket. The transmission is an off the shelf rebuild, probably for an Olds or Pontiac. The rear end is a Chevy 12 bolt- not the correct Buick 10 bolt. The seats are from a '70 Riviera, upholstered in the correct material for my car. Three of the 4 wheels are from junkyards and aren't original. All my emblems except two are reproductions. The grilles in my hood scoops are reproductions as are the foam seals to the air cleaner. My convertible roof is reproduction, as is the top boot, my rocker panel covers, my carpet, my window cranks, my headrest locks, my weatherstripping, my trunklid and my door lock buttons. Neither fender is from the car, and I'm replacing them with fenders from a '71 Skylark 4 door. Both my doors were from hardtops, one a '70 and the other a '72. The '72 door had to be modified to fit properly because some plants made slightly different contours on one edge. The Hood is from a '70 GSX

But my VIN says it's a particular car, not the culmination of all these other cars long since gone to the crusher, plus all my new aftermarket pieces. So for all that, is my car not what the VIN reads now?

I'd say no, the car is exactly as the VIN decodes

With aircraft, it's a little harder. The FAA doesn't care if a main spar is original or a one of a kind; a corroded main spar is replaced with a new one, period, or the plane doesn't fly

In 1945, if the plane was damaged and could be repaired, they'd do the same thing and the plane was still a B-25. As long as the structure is made according to the plans, I see no issue

TgD Thunderbolt56
06-19-2006, 11:56 AM
Originally posted by Hashmark13:
...A while back, I remember they pulled a P38 out of an iceberg. It was frozen solid in it. They had huge machines melt a cavern around it, then brought it up in sections. It was fully restorted and flew at the end of the program.


Glacier Girl