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View Full Version : Story of a defecting Soviet pilot, 1945



Rammjaeger
05-08-2007, 04:18 PM
http://i186.photobucket.com/albums/x148/Rammjaeger1983/12.jpg

http://i186.photobucket.com/albums/x148/Rammjaeger1983/13.jpg

From the book "Yak fighters in action" by Hans-Heiri Stapfer (Squadron/Signal Publications, 1986)

LEXX_Luthor
05-08-2007, 07:30 PM
For those not waiting for the ads to load, the Yak pilot landed in Ussian sector of Germany and asked for emigration to Ussia, but the Ussians told the Yak pilot to get out of town by sundown, so the pilot took off again and flew to Swisserland -- and freedom(tm) -- but was given back to the Reds in exchange for captured Red Cross personnel. I'm not feeling exactly "Patriotic" after reading that. Yak pilot should have waited a year or two.

Thanks RamJ, I must look for info on Lt. Genandji Nikitovitch Kotchetov.

Rammjaeger
05-08-2007, 08:37 PM
Originally posted by LEXX_Luthor:
For those not waiting for the ads to load,

What ads? I only see one on top of the page.


the Yak pilot landed in Ussian sector of Germany and asked for emigration to Ussia, but the Ussians told the Yak pilot to get out of town by sundown, so the pilot took off again and flew to Swisserland -- and freedom(tm) -- but was given back to the Reds in exchange for captured Red Cross personnel. I'm not feeling exactly "Patriotic" after reading that. Yak pilot should have waited a year or two.

Thanks RamJ, I must look for info on Lt. Genandji Nikitovitch Kotchetov.

The funny thing is that although the Soviet pilot was not given either asylum or citizenship, it seems that at least his plane got refueled.

LEXX_Luthor
05-08-2007, 09:02 PM
it seems that at least his plane got refueled.
He should have had a Yak-9DD. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif


What ads? I had to wait about half a minute for some other website to load data -- Watch the loading data bar at bottom of web browser. Something about "ad" or something. So I closed the imageshack page and tried a few more times until it all loaded. Lots of sites do this now. On many sites, the relevant reading text would load and the ads kept loading, I would hit ESCAPE to cancel the ads. But now they require the ads to be loaded successfully before you see the webpage content, and if the ads don't load, you are screwed. I pretty much just stop visiting sites like that.

FE_pilot
05-08-2007, 09:05 PM
I wonder what happened to him when they returned him back to Russia? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

heywooood
05-08-2007, 09:06 PM
re; ads - yeah - I'm surprised more people dont notice that...sshhh don't wake 'em up.

Rammjaeger
05-09-2007, 04:36 AM
Originally posted by FE_pilot:
I wonder what happened to him when they returned him back to Russia? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

Probably court martial and execution.

Vike
05-09-2007, 04:38 AM
Originally posted by Rammjaeger:
Probably court martial and execution.

OMG... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

Rammjaeger
05-09-2007, 04:45 AM
Originally posted by Vike:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Rammjaeger:
Probably court martial and execution.

OMG... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I wouldn't expect anything else. The Soviet Union was, shall we say, not renowned for being soft on treason.

Vike
05-09-2007, 04:58 AM
Originally posted by Rammjaeger:
I wouldn't expect anything else. The Soviet Union was, shall we say, not renowned for being soft on treason.

Yes for sure,but why was he rejected by the USA and/or Swiss? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

He didn't defected toward Germany afaik,so,in the absolute and with a little naivety,he was an "allied pilot" going to an "allied sector"... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif

At the end of his journey,he would have met Death by his own country.That would be ironically harsh. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

@+

tigertalon
05-09-2007, 05:05 AM
Originally posted by Rammjaeger:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Vike:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Rammjaeger:
Probably court martial and execution.

OMG... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I wouldn't expect anything else. The Soviet Union was, shall we say, not renowned for being soft on treason. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

TBH, all countries were. Nothing else than a quick execution can be expected in such case.



Originally posted by Vike:
Yes for sure,but why was he rejected by the USA and/or Swiss? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

He didn't defected toward Germany afaik,so,in the absolute and with a little naivety,he was an "allied pilot" going to an "allied sector"... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif

At the end of his journey,he would have met Death by his own country.That would be ironically harsh. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif


AFAIK there was an agreement between Western allies and Soviet Union which prohibited both sides to accept the defectors from the other side and give them assylum. Was more one-side agreement obviously.

Rammjaeger
05-09-2007, 05:09 AM
>Yes for sure,but why was he rejected by the USA and/or Swiss? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

There wasn't much talk of a cold war in 1945. Relations between USA and USSR weren't strained. Obviously nobody wanted to insult the Russians by giving asylum to a defector.

>He didn't defected toward Germany afaik,so,in the absolute and with a little naivety,he was an "allied pilot" going to an "allied sector"... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif

It was a different occupation zone. You couldn't go into another zone without permission.

horseback
05-09-2007, 09:58 AM
I didn't catch whether he attempted his 'emigration flight' before or after VJ Day, but things were a bit unsettled in that first year after hostilities ended in Europe.

For the average soldiers in the Western Allies' armies, the Soviets had been painted as brothers in arms, and fellow warriors against the Nazis. It would be hard for them to accept the idea that anyone in the Workers' Paradise that they'd been hearing about for the last 40 months or so would want to desert his country for the Land of Coca Cola and Lucky Strikes.

From the upper levels, there was an appreciation of what Stalin's regime actually was, but there was also an understanding that they might still need the Red Army for the projected invasion of Japan. Add in the already established trigger happy reactions of the Soviets to any penetrations (innocent or otherwise) of the territories they held coupled with the rapid depletion of Allied forces in Europe...well, there was a definite air of "for God's sake, don't p*ss them off."

I suspect that the young lieutenant may not have completed the flight home, much less received a chance to defend his actions in a trial.

cheers

horseback

BfHeFwMe
05-09-2007, 11:45 AM
Among other things not all non-Russian allied POW's were ever returned. The disdain for POW's was so ingrained, they even deported liberated allies to the Russian death camps. It didn't matter who you were, not even Stalins own son received any leniency.

It was so bad, soldiers who fought honorably and survived the war were deported to live in exile. Stalin wouldn't allow massive returns home of tainted soldiers who had seen a bit of the west. He was quite the paranoid psychotic butcher, and anyone would do, citizen or not.

Rammjaeger
05-09-2007, 01:10 PM
Originally posted by horseback:
I didn't catch whether he attempted his 'emigration flight' before or after VJ Day

From the upper levels, there was an appreciation of what Stalin's regime actually was, but there was also an understanding that they might still need the Red Army for the projected invasion of Japan.

The defection happened in late August 1945, after Japan had surrendered.

With respect to Soviet POWs returned to the USSR: I've recently read about a claim of a Russian historian that about 86% of them received forced labour sentences and were simply re-drafted into the Soviet Army afterwards. The rest received longer sentences or were shot.