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jamesdietz
03-29-2007, 07:49 PM
I'm currently worlking on a painting & would lke to get position of landing lights right..can anyone provide specs?
http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d116/jamesdietz/OnCanvas7.jpg

leitmotiv
03-29-2007, 08:22 PM
The only halfway decent plans I can recall were in an ancient ca. 1980 AERODATA publication. They were 1:72. If you are in the UK, the RAF Museum is likely to have complete builder's plans. Anyway, the landing lights (two lamps) were under the port, outboard wing, and the lamps were hinged to drop down. Now is where it gets complicated. Some Lancs had one of the lights removed! Photos of the subject will be your friend. Glad to answer any questions. I've been a Lanc fiend for decades. There is a classic wartime photo of a Lanc taxiing with the lights on. It was in the photo section of Middlebrook's THE NUREMBERG RAID.

leitmotiv
03-29-2007, 08:28 PM
http://www.militaryaircraft.de/pictures/military/aircraft/Avro-Lancaster/Avro-Lancaster_RIAT2005_007_800.jpg

leitmotiv
03-29-2007, 08:32 PM
This is an absolutely indispensable Lanc research tool:

http://www.flyingzonedirect.com/lancastercdrom/moreinformation.htm

FritzGryphon
03-29-2007, 09:07 PM
This is an absolutely indispensable Lanc research tool:

Wow, that does look cool. Do you know anything about the interior photos? I'm wondering how comprehensive they are.

PBNA-Boosher
03-29-2007, 09:28 PM
Looks impressive already!

Waldo.Pepper
03-29-2007, 09:37 PM
Check PM.

leitmotiv
03-29-2007, 10:44 PM
It is comprehensive. The only downside is that all the images are from a restored Lanc. I would have preferred some from the RAF Museum's mint S for sugar, but this is supreme quibbling. There are also a goodly number of sketches and info from official technical pubs.

This is, of course, the best book for Lanc details:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lancaster-Manual-Official-Publi...id=1175229956&sr=1-1 (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lancaster-Manual-Official-Publication-1942-1945/dp/1853675687/ref=sr_1_1/203-0197731-1774371?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1175229956&sr=1-1)

And, Francis K. Mason's comprehensive Lanc history remains the best ever written (if you can find a copy):

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Avro-Lancaster-Francis-K-Mason/...id=1175230130&sr=1-1 (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Avro-Lancaster-Francis-K-Mason/dp/0946627304/ref=sr_1_1/203-0197731-1774371?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1175230130&sr=1-1)

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&an=...10&tn=lancaster&x=32 (http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&an=francis+k+mason&y=10&tn=lancaster&x=32)

FritzGryphon
03-29-2007, 11:45 PM
but this is supreme quibbling

Not really. Pics of restored (as in modified) planes are about as useful as a plane with monster truck wheels for wings.

leitmotiv
03-30-2007, 12:18 AM
Depends on who did the job, the resources they had, and how many old hands who had actually built and operated the planes were in on the job. I won't dismiss a restored airplane out of hand, but I'll withhold judgment until I know the facts about the job.

stansdds
03-30-2007, 04:30 AM
Some restored planes dispense with a lot of the original military equipment and/or correct color paint and markings, others are as accurate to the real combat aircraft as possible. Case in point: the Collings Foundation's B-17 and B-24. What they lack is armor plating (weight issue and likely impossible to find), live ammunition and firing pins and other internal parts for the machine guns. Otherwise, these two heavy bombers are about as close to those that were in combat as you are likely to ever see.

major_setback
03-30-2007, 10:44 AM
Lancaster Walkaround:

This might be of some use. I haven't checked for pictures of the lights though.

http://www.aircraftresourcecenter.com/AWA1/501-600/walk...ngsworth/walk525.htm (http://www.aircraftresourcecenter.com/AWA1/501-600/walk525_Lancaster_Hollingsworth/walk525.htm)

leitmotiv
03-30-2007, 11:22 AM
That is a beauty! It's a late Lancaster with the Martin .50 cal. dorsal turret, late-standard .50 cal. tail turret, and wider rudders.

major_setback
03-30-2007, 12:19 PM
Are those the only landing lights, the ones on on the wing?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schoolradio/history/photo/media/pic28_lancaster_gallery.jpg

http://home.clara.net/heureka/lincolnshire/lancaster00.jpg

luftluuver
03-30-2007, 12:23 PM
Won't help with your painting but has the bomb loads for the Lanc, http://www.lancaster-archive.com/Lanc-bombs-Loads.htm

Also

The Lancaster Manual: the Official Air Publication for the Lancaster Mk I and III, 1942-1945

The Lancaster Manual: The Official Air Publication for the Lancaster Mk I and III, 1942-1945 edited by Dr. Michael A. Fopp. Greenhill Books/Lionel Leventhal Limited (http://www. greenhillbooks.com), Park House, 1 Russell Gardens, London NW11 9NN, 2003, 532 pages, 25.00 [pounds sterling] (hardcover).

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NXL/is_3_18/ai_n6361659

and

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lancaster-Manual-Official-Publi...2-1945/dp/1853675687 (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lancaster-Manual-Official-Publication-1942-1945/dp/1853675687)

luftluuver
03-30-2007, 12:27 PM
Originally posted by leitmotiv:
That is a beauty! It's a late Lancaster with the Martin .50 cal. dorsal turret, late-standard .50 cal. tail turret, and wider rudders. When did the Lanc get wider rudders? The Halifax did tho.

leitmotiv
03-30-2007, 12:43 PM
Those are the landing lights under the port outboard wing. The lamps drop down to hang vertically. Some aircraft had only one.

Around 1945 the Lancs started getting rudders designed for the Lincoln which were of a different shape at the bottom, and which had wider trib tabs (full details in F.K. Mason's Lancaster history cited above).

http://www.jaapteeuwen.com/ww2aircraft/pictures/jpg/avro%20694%20lincoln.jpg

Lincoln with the wider rudders (the two color photos of Lanc OR-M above show the same fins)

major_setback
03-30-2007, 02:20 PM
A slightly bigger picture:
http://www.airliners.net/open.file?id=1090353&size=L&wi...vq%20QRFP&photo_nr=3 (http://www.airliners.net/open.file?id=1090353&size=L&width=1024&height=695&sok=JURER%20%20%28nvepensg%20%3D%20%27Nieb%20Ynapn fgre%20Zx%20K%27%29%20%20BEQRE%20OL%20cubgb_vq%20Q RFP&photo_nr=3)

EmKen
03-30-2007, 04:14 PM
I think Leitmotiv's picture is of the Lancaster IV which eventually became the Lincoln -the dorsal turret with what looks like 20mm cannon and the annular rad housings, plus the hi aspect ratio wings make it distinctly un-Lanc like on closer inspection.

EmKen

leitmotiv
03-30-2007, 05:17 PM
Emken, if you had read the posts, I was showing the late Lancaster rudders were the same type used on the Lincoln.

Yes, major_setback, that shot shows the standard rudders fitted on almost all Lancasters.

dolphin2_384
04-04-2007, 07:59 AM
Just like to say to James Dietz I think your paintings are incredible. I recently discovered you after years of admiring Robert Taylor and Nicholas Trudgian but always wanted a more human element in aviation paintings and that is what you provide. Thanks for everything and good luck!

jamesdietz
04-04-2007, 09:30 AM
Many thanks for your kind words Dolphin..and thanks to the guys who helped me on this post...here are the results...
http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d116/jamesdietz/Finish1a-1.jpg

DxyFlyr
04-04-2007, 11:32 AM
That looks fantastic. I saw a couple of your paintings at the Pensacola Naval Air Museum a while back. Very nice work. Thanks for posting!

Banger2004
04-04-2007, 12:30 PM
Originally posted by jamesdietz:
Many thanks for your kind words Dolphin..and thanks to the guys who helped me on this post...here are the results...
http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d116/jamesdietz/Finish1a-1.jpg

This is really rather excellent, you have a fine talent. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

major_setback
04-04-2007, 12:32 PM
Yes. A very nice lively looking picture from you...as always http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif.

leitmotiv
04-04-2007, 12:34 PM
Splendid work! Glad to have played my part in art history outside of being the subject of one of Francis Bacon's dog paintings, arf arf.