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Papa_K
01-27-2005, 10:51 PM
Ran across this recently. Thought some would enjoy this:

[The following is a slighly altered excerpt from a USAF Fighter Weapons School paper (I didn't track down the author's name). Some, if not all of it, applies here. I deleted and changed some text, taking out references to jets and missile engagements -- the "jist" is still there without the specifics of the author's aircraft type.]


RULES FOR STAYING ALIVE IN A MULTI-BOGEY ENVIRONMENT

1. BE READY FOR THE ENVIRONMENT. The more attention you can devote to the fight itself, the more likely you are to survive. It is imperative to enter the air combat arena fully prepared. In particular:

a. KNOW YOUR AIRPLANE. The pilot must be able to judge his airspeed, angle-of-attack, and energy state without looking inside the cockpit. In addition, he has to be up on such things as his machine's stall indications, corner speed, and optimum altitude/airspeed regimes for fighting each possible threat aircraft.

b. KNOW YOUR WEAPONS. The "switchology" for getting ordnance off must be down cold. Similarly, the pilot has to be able to visually recongnize the firing parameters for the weapons he is carrying. When the sky is black with bandits you don't want to waste bullets.

c. STUDY THE PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF POSSIBLE THREAT AIRCRAFT AS WELL AS THE WEAPONS ASSOCIATED WITH EACH. The other guy's limitations tell you how to set about killing him. Conversely, his capabilities reflect how he can get to you.

d. TRAIN!!! Since most pilots tend to fight like they train, PRACTICE AS OFTEN AND REALITICALLY AS YOU CAN. The place to begin working out coordination and support tactics for multi-bogey environments is not the combat arena. Do that in training where you can safely learn from your mistakes. In particular, practice fighting both as a single against two or more bogeys, and as a section against two or three times your number.

2. SURVIVE FIRST, KILL BOGEYS SECOND. True, your job is to shoot down bad-guy airplanes. But, if you plan on staying alive, it is essential to temper aggressiveness with intelligence. For instance, you must be willing to give up shots to avoid being shot down yourself.

3. WHILE MUTUAL SUPPORT WITH OTHER FRIENDLIES MAY BE ACCIDENTAL AT TIMES, GET AS MUCH OF IT AS YOU CAN. There can be more safety in numbers. The more eyeballs you have on the enemy, the better. The more potential shooters you make the enemy react to, the better. Mutual support, however loose it may be, can make your task simpler and safer.

4. STAY FAST -- SPEED IS LIFE. The faster you go, the longer it will take bogeys to close to lethal range from behind. So gain energy whenever you can and don't waste it with unnecessary maneuvering. (NOTE: Energy awareness always applies.)

5. BE UNPREDICTABLE! This precept, like Rule 1, has many ramifications. Among them are:

a. AVOID THE TURNING FIGHT. If you do any great amount of turning in a multi-bogey environment, you are bound to give some of the bogeys shots. Thus you must resist the temptation to start turning. At the same time, when you do turn, TURN HARD. (The rest of the time go as fast as you can.) (NOTE: Where would this NOT APPLY? Do you outnumber the enemy? Can you out-turn him?)

b. TAKE SHOTS OF OPPORTUNITY ONLY. If you chase any one bogey for an extended period of time, you can count on having some other bogey on your tail. Why? Because while you are chasing the first bogey you're predictable. Avoid this by simply waiting for someone to fly to a position in front of you to shoot. There will be plenty of opportunities. (What is this saying? If you saddle up on someone, staying behind him for an extended period, you will draw bandits to your six.)

c. DON'T FOLLOW YOUR KILLS. Again, while you're admiring your kill, possibly even circling him, you're predictable. You can't watch the bogey burn and properly clear yourself at the same time.

6. YOU AND YOU ALONE ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR CHECKING YOUR OWN SIX O'CLOCK. So keep your head on a swivel and make frequent belly checks.

7. EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED. Count on things going wrong. For example, how are you going to handle an aircraft emergency or aircraft damage in a multi-bogey environment?

8. KEEP IT SIMPLE. Stick with straightforward tactics and easy plans -- things you know. Avoid being fancy (it probably won't work anyway).

9. PLAN YOUR BUGOUT EARLY. Don't wait until you're running out of gas, or about to be shot down, to start thinking about leaving the fight. Also, when you do disengage, try to go with a buddy and avoid leaving anyone behind in the fight by himself.

These maxims summarize the principal suggestions made for fighting multiple enemy aircraft, with or without mutual support -- most have been around for many years, and even date back to the earliest days of aerial combat.

Papa_K

Papa_K
01-27-2005, 10:51 PM
Ran across this recently. Thought some would enjoy this:

[The following is a slighly altered excerpt from a USAF Fighter Weapons School paper (I didn't track down the author's name). Some, if not all of it, applies here. I deleted and changed some text, taking out references to jets and missile engagements -- the "jist" is still there without the specifics of the author's aircraft type.]


RULES FOR STAYING ALIVE IN A MULTI-BOGEY ENVIRONMENT

1. BE READY FOR THE ENVIRONMENT. The more attention you can devote to the fight itself, the more likely you are to survive. It is imperative to enter the air combat arena fully prepared. In particular:

a. KNOW YOUR AIRPLANE. The pilot must be able to judge his airspeed, angle-of-attack, and energy state without looking inside the cockpit. In addition, he has to be up on such things as his machine's stall indications, corner speed, and optimum altitude/airspeed regimes for fighting each possible threat aircraft.

b. KNOW YOUR WEAPONS. The "switchology" for getting ordnance off must be down cold. Similarly, the pilot has to be able to visually recongnize the firing parameters for the weapons he is carrying. When the sky is black with bandits you don't want to waste bullets.

c. STUDY THE PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF POSSIBLE THREAT AIRCRAFT AS WELL AS THE WEAPONS ASSOCIATED WITH EACH. The other guy's limitations tell you how to set about killing him. Conversely, his capabilities reflect how he can get to you.

d. TRAIN!!! Since most pilots tend to fight like they train, PRACTICE AS OFTEN AND REALITICALLY AS YOU CAN. The place to begin working out coordination and support tactics for multi-bogey environments is not the combat arena. Do that in training where you can safely learn from your mistakes. In particular, practice fighting both as a single against two or more bogeys, and as a section against two or three times your number.

2. SURVIVE FIRST, KILL BOGEYS SECOND. True, your job is to shoot down bad-guy airplanes. But, if you plan on staying alive, it is essential to temper aggressiveness with intelligence. For instance, you must be willing to give up shots to avoid being shot down yourself.

3. WHILE MUTUAL SUPPORT WITH OTHER FRIENDLIES MAY BE ACCIDENTAL AT TIMES, GET AS MUCH OF IT AS YOU CAN. There can be more safety in numbers. The more eyeballs you have on the enemy, the better. The more potential shooters you make the enemy react to, the better. Mutual support, however loose it may be, can make your task simpler and safer.

4. STAY FAST -- SPEED IS LIFE. The faster you go, the longer it will take bogeys to close to lethal range from behind. So gain energy whenever you can and don't waste it with unnecessary maneuvering. (NOTE: Energy awareness always applies.)

5. BE UNPREDICTABLE! This precept, like Rule 1, has many ramifications. Among them are:

a. AVOID THE TURNING FIGHT. If you do any great amount of turning in a multi-bogey environment, you are bound to give some of the bogeys shots. Thus you must resist the temptation to start turning. At the same time, when you do turn, TURN HARD. (The rest of the time go as fast as you can.) (NOTE: Where would this NOT APPLY? Do you outnumber the enemy? Can you out-turn him?)

b. TAKE SHOTS OF OPPORTUNITY ONLY. If you chase any one bogey for an extended period of time, you can count on having some other bogey on your tail. Why? Because while you are chasing the first bogey you're predictable. Avoid this by simply waiting for someone to fly to a position in front of you to shoot. There will be plenty of opportunities. (What is this saying? If you saddle up on someone, staying behind him for an extended period, you will draw bandits to your six.)

c. DON'T FOLLOW YOUR KILLS. Again, while you're admiring your kill, possibly even circling him, you're predictable. You can't watch the bogey burn and properly clear yourself at the same time.

6. YOU AND YOU ALONE ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR CHECKING YOUR OWN SIX O'CLOCK. So keep your head on a swivel and make frequent belly checks.

7. EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED. Count on things going wrong. For example, how are you going to handle an aircraft emergency or aircraft damage in a multi-bogey environment?

8. KEEP IT SIMPLE. Stick with straightforward tactics and easy plans -- things you know. Avoid being fancy (it probably won't work anyway).

9. PLAN YOUR BUGOUT EARLY. Don't wait until you're running out of gas, or about to be shot down, to start thinking about leaving the fight. Also, when you do disengage, try to go with a buddy and avoid leaving anyone behind in the fight by himself.

These maxims summarize the principal suggestions made for fighting multiple enemy aircraft, with or without mutual support -- most have been around for many years, and even date back to the earliest days of aerial combat.

Papa_K

SlickStick
01-27-2005, 10:59 PM
Excellent read and almost a road map to staying alive online in this game. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Thanks for posting this, Papa_K. I think it will help allot of noobs and vets alike. Most of it I try to use as gospel already. Two things I've learned about this game online...

1. There is no substitute for gunnery. All the maneuvering in the world doesn't mean squat, if you can't make the kill when you have the opportunity.

2. Situational Awareness is the backbone of everything you need to do online to be successful.

IMHO, of course. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

WTE_Galway
01-27-2005, 11:14 PM
just fly inverted under bridges .. they will be so stunned by the stupidity of the manouvre they will fly into the bridge themselves

Stiglr
01-28-2005, 12:15 AM
Yep, and all this sage advice goes completely counter to the notgoodknight brand of fighting.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

He'd consider all this unmanly.

nakamura_kenji
01-28-2005, 02:27 AM
1a. KNOW YOUR AIRPLANE.

I come to learn with fighters like ki-43 and A6M5 you usually get plenty of wanring of stall when turning, plane starts visible shudder so can either add combat flaps sometimes help me or just be careful and be ready for stall and hope no one behind ^_^

Tooz_69GIAP
01-28-2005, 03:07 AM
You know, I have never flown in the same server as GK, and yet I hear all this krap about him.

Need to jump in a server with him next time I see him online.

Iron-Works
01-28-2005, 11:41 AM
Good post!

PBNA-Boosher
01-28-2005, 06:05 PM
Don't forget to use bridges and smokestacks to their fullest advantages, especially when dealing with AI. If you drag them close to you and keep maneuvering through them, that's how your enviornment helps you the most.