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GazzaMataz
05-27-2004, 06:04 AM
I know that this may vary depending on the country concerned but how long did it take from grabbing a completely new recruit, to turning him into a pilot ready for action?

1 week? 2-3 weeks? 6 weeks?

I am keen to get an idea since I have been playing Ill-2 nearly everyday for over 2 months. I have found without going to any flight school and picking up bits here and there from this forum/tracks/manual I still think I am pretty ropey.

In fact although the manual/tracks tell you how to do this and that, it would be nice to have all this info in some form of 'Flight School' pdf. I now we have this excellent forum, but you cannot read it in bed, in the bath or garden on a nice summers day.

I mean I don't understand complex engine management the manual tells you what does what but it don't tell you why http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/blink.gif

Tickety boo...
Gazzamataz
http://www.gazzamataz.com

GazzaMataz
05-27-2004, 06:04 AM
I know that this may vary depending on the country concerned but how long did it take from grabbing a completely new recruit, to turning him into a pilot ready for action?

1 week? 2-3 weeks? 6 weeks?

I am keen to get an idea since I have been playing Ill-2 nearly everyday for over 2 months. I have found without going to any flight school and picking up bits here and there from this forum/tracks/manual I still think I am pretty ropey.

In fact although the manual/tracks tell you how to do this and that, it would be nice to have all this info in some form of 'Flight School' pdf. I now we have this excellent forum, but you cannot read it in bed, in the bath or garden on a nice summers day.

I mean I don't understand complex engine management the manual tells you what does what but it don't tell you why http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/blink.gif

Tickety boo...
Gazzamataz
http://www.gazzamataz.com

PBNA-Boosher
05-27-2004, 06:10 AM
Training tracks tell you what to do, but you can't do it yourself, the best thing to do is take a fairly easy plane to learn in, say a B-239 for it's nice handling characteristics, train him in that, show him the maneuvers, have him learn them. That's all you can really do.
It's unfortunate, but a combat pilot has to just learn on his own via way of mistakes how to survive a combat situation. In time he will fare better. The only things I can say to urge him are:

Speed
Altitude
Accuracy
Unpredictability
STAY WITH YOUR WINGMAN (the best skilled pilot should be the wingman, not the noob, because you want the better pilot backing the one on point up.
NOT TO GET INTO A DOGFIGHT! (get him while he can't see you.)

A noobie getting into a dogfight, while it will be fun, can be costly. And nobody wants to lose another life.


Oh and for CEM:

Prop pitch is like switching gears in a car. It helps you get those high speeds without too many RPM's. If your engine starts sounding too high pitched, bring down some prop pitch. It also has an effect on maneuverability. I find that in the planes I fly, P-40, P-38, Yak-1, I can maneuver best wit hmy prop pitch set to 80%, but when you're in control, it's your decision.

Fuel mixture is how much fuel you're mixing with the air to combust in the engine. Down low it should be a fairly high concentration, say 120%, but up high, you don't need as much fuel, otherwise you'll flood the engine.

If you use Magnetos, keep them on 1+2, you'll get the most RPM's out of the engine. However, if you have a slight Horsepower loss, or there's engine trouble, moving back down to one magneto could save your life. Also, if you have an engine fire in a single engine aircraft, cut your power, mixture, and magnetos, this will hold the explosion as long as possible, giving you time to bail out.

tsisqua
05-27-2004, 06:41 AM
For a US pilot during WWII, 30 hours flying time.

How scarry is that?


Tsisqua

Efilur
05-27-2004, 03:04 PM
On the prop pitch, it differs very much from plane to plane. many planes can be flown on 100% without overrevving except in dives. That´s not the case with the 109´s and 190´s however. They have autopitch, but having a button that switch between that and manual is very good.

At takeoff:
109´s - 90%
190´s - 95-100%

At lowspeed fight:
109´s - 85-90%
190´s - 95-100%

This gives much better acceleration. Then map some buttons to decrease or increase this in increments of 5%. Before the fight you then have it set to between 85-100% on manual, but you fly on auto. When you get into a lowspeed stallfight/vertical moves you just switch to manual. Usually 300km/h and below. You´ll get much better controlability and respons from the plane. I actually use this before going to flaps many times.

Boosher´s advice is very good. I would like to add stick to one plane you really fancy and feel alot for (maybe after the B-239 training). Then get this down. PERFECT LANDINGS and PERFECT SHOOTING. Set up some missions yourself in the missionbuilder just to practice gunnery. For this I like to shoot only with the cannons if you have machineguns on the nose. Reason is then the overdone muzzleflash won´t obscure the view and you´ll actually see exactly what you hit. 30 mm in the nose obscures the view too.

To get maxiumum effect with wingguns you have to be wingslevel with the target.

In general, only shoot in a steady or non "nose-accelerating" flightpath. You need a good precise stick.

Deflection shooting accuracy. Cover a few basic variants/angles off.

Ability to down your fow with a short well controlled burst is the most satisfying. If you don´t want to spray and pray, set the convergence to 200 m or below.

---------------

It´s really alot of basic things, not so much fancy stuff. Don´t forget nice three point landings, helps to get a feel for your plane. Best thing would really be to learn from a pilot who knows all the stuff. Or go through a complete course/program any squad might have. Hope you find some good one to fly with on comms! Every WW2 pilot sometime needed someone to pass it on you know...

I think avoiding any shortcuts will keep the interest in the sim burning much longer. So put a frame to the time you spend in dogfightservers just for fun. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

huggy87
05-27-2004, 03:42 PM
Based on my grandfather's logbook, and the myriad autobiographies I have read it was usually upwards of a year before a U.S. pilot was sent overseas. Most pilots had at least 200 hours. Nowadays, an American pilot will get around 350 hours before they are sent to an operational squadron.

GazzaMataz
05-28-2004, 03:09 AM
Gee fanx chaps!

Looks like I still have got a lot of practice to do, but at least your great advice points me in the right direction.

I think I will have to have a bash at online gaming soon but it's all those horrible viruses and spyware out there that put me off.

I definately need to practice landings in the snow and rain - I hate those scenarios http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-mad.gif

I know that Spitfire pilots had 10hrs training on Spits before they went into the BoB but how many hours on Tiger Moths?

BTW love that Brewster Buffalo! I must have an affinity for fat little planes http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Tickety boo...
Gazzamataz
http://www.gazzamataz.com

[This message was edited by GazzaMataz on Fri May 28 2004 at 11:56 AM.]