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verbaska
09-15-2007, 07:45 AM
Who here has real airplanes? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

mortoma
09-15-2007, 04:39 PM
There are a few in this community that own private aircraft. Unfortunately, I'm not among them!! I came close to buying a Piper Warrior once, but the mechanic I had do an inspection on it talked me out of it. He said it was apparent that at one time it was a "Florida plane" and therefore had corrosion bubbling up underneath the paint. I'm sure some of the guys will eventually post in here.

Taylortony
09-15-2007, 05:29 PM
Maintain a fleet of them and help out a bit on a Spit.

Choctaw111
09-15-2007, 08:09 PM
My father had a Piper Cherokee 235. We would take it out quite a bit (I thought). He sold it a couple of years ago saying that he did not have enough time for it to justify the expense. I sure do miss it.

xTHRUDx
09-15-2007, 10:21 PM
i rent.

if it Floats , Flys or F^>ks, it's cheaper to rent it than own it.

erco415
09-16-2007, 06:33 AM
I've got a 1946 Ercoupe, model 415C. A great little flying machine. Someone go back in time and keep me from starting to restore it, please. It's been too long in my garage... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/bigtears.gif
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i278/ercos-hangar/ercosercoupe.jpg
This is what it looks like in one piece, though this one isn't mine:
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i278/ercos-hangar/ercoupe001.jpg

mortoma
09-16-2007, 07:43 AM
Is your Ercoupe one of those that has the rudder linked to the ailerons?? I wouldn't like one of those and if it was one, I'd de-link the controls if I were you. But then again, did they even have rudder pedals to begin with? This was supposed to simplify flying for the masses and appeal more to women and such. In those days they thought everyone was going to have a plane or chopper in their garage one day. Never happened of course. I never understood how you were supposed to do a crosswind landing in one of those control linked Ercoupes!!

mortoma
09-16-2007, 07:47 AM
Originally posted by Taylortony:
Maintain a fleet of them and help out a bit on a Spit. Do you own some sort of aviation outfit?

mortoma
09-16-2007, 07:55 AM
Originally posted by mortoma:
There are a few in this community that own private aircraft. Unfortunately, I'm not among them!! I came close to buying a Piper Warrior once, but the mechanic I had do an inspection on it talked me out of it. He said it was apparent that at one time it was a "Florida plane" and therefore had corrosion bubbling up underneath the paint. I'm sure some of the guys will eventually post in here. I take that back, the mechanic said that because it was probably a "Florida plane" ( or at least a plane that had spent a lot of it's life near the sea ), that it looked like someone had tried to repaint it and did not get the stripper off of the bare metal very well. This was causing the paint to bubble up, since it did not adhere/bond to the aluminum very well. The more I thought about the incident, the more returned to my memory cells.

Kettenhunde
09-16-2007, 07:59 AM
I am an owner.

All the Best,

Crumpp

erco415
09-16-2007, 01:26 PM
Originally posted by mortoma:
Is your Ercoupe one of those that has the rudder linked to the ailerons?? I wouldn't like one of those and if it was one, I'd de-link the controls if I were you. But then again, did they even have rudder pedals to begin with? This was supposed to simplify flying for the masses and appeal more to women and such. In those days they thought everyone was going to have a plane or chopper in their garage one day. Never happened of course. I never understood how you were supposed to do a crosswind landing in one of those control linked Ercoupes!!

Nearly all of the various models of the Ercoupe were built as 'two-control' airplanes, in which the ailerons and rudder are interconnected - no rudder pedals! Rudder pedals were offered as an option when the plane was introduced, but so few people ordered them that it was dropped. The last 'Coupes, the Alon Aircoupe and Mooney M-10 Cadet, are more likely to have them. The Mooney's almost certainly will have them.

The thing is, you don't need them.

The Ercoupe was a evolution of Fred Weick's W-1, which was entered into the 1936 safety plane competition. Then, as now, most pilots got themselves killed by flying into weather that was beyond their capabilities. #2 on the list was the stall/spin accident. But, make an airplane that can't be stalled, that can't be flown uncoordinated, and you have an airplane that can't spin. Thus, the Ercoupe is an engineer's solution. The elevator up travel is limited, so that you can't stall in any normal sense. The twin tails eliminate the effect of the spiraling slipstream. The engine is canted down and to the right to reduce the effects of P-factor. The ailerons are differential. And finally, the rudders are linked to the ailerons to automatically coordinate any banking. The result is quite pleasant to fly, fast and efficient.

What folks who put the pedals in their airplanes find is that the rudders are really not all that effective for slips. Originally sized to eliminate the adverse yaw -and nothing more- the rudders aren't as powerful as what you get in conventional aircraft. And, you don't need to slip to land a tricycle gear airplane in a crosswind.

Landing a coupe in a crosswind is a little uncomfortable at first, because it's so foreign to what you're taught. But you soon adapt. All you do is fly your crab down the centerline of the runway and touch down on the main gear. The center of gravity causes the aircraft to then align with the direction of travel and there you have it. "But wait!", you say, "doesn't that make for a lot of noise and wear on the aircraft?" No, the reason being is that the coupe sits on the ground with it's wing at an negative angle of attack. Thus, once the nosewheel is on the ground, the airplane is DONE flying. Where all the drama come from when you touch down in a crab is that the airplane is still sorta flying while you drag it along the ground. ANY tricycle gear airplane can be landed in a crab. Instead of a crosswind component expressed in windspeed, we have one expressed in degrees off of runway heading. And a Coupe can handle more crosswind than any of it's contemporaries.

The two control Ercoupe is a very pleasant, if different, airplane to fly!

PanzerkwgnIV
09-16-2007, 06:30 PM
Originally posted by erco415:
I've got a 1946 Ercoupe, model 415C. A great little flying machine. Someone go back in time and keep me from starting to restore it, please. It's been too long in my garage... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/bigtears.gif
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i278/ercos-hangar/ercosercoupe.jpg
This is what it looks like in one piece, though this one isn't mine:
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i278/ercos-hangar/ercoupe001.jpg
Temporarily ban you from the game, thus you can restore the plane, once it is finished the ban is lifted and it sits in your garage again,
but it is a fully restored plane sitting in your garage.

mortoma
09-16-2007, 06:52 PM
I also heard ( or read ) that the main gear are trailing and can "turn" a little side to side, thus helping when you land crabbed into a crosswind. The wheels simply take the side load in stride. Is that true?? I'd also like to know if there is a top cover for the canopy. Sure would suck flying open in the winter, but great in the summer on hot days.

buzzsaw1939
09-16-2007, 08:55 PM
Mortoma.. Yes that is true, they had a small castering effect that was sping loaded as I remember. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Esel1964
09-16-2007, 11:08 PM
Ercoupes are my favorite small plane,has been since I first saw one at an airshow as a young kid.Congrats Erco415!

I don't own a plane,but we've got a runway and hangar,we bought a piece of property on the Brazos River and the previous owner owned a Taylorcraft.

erco415
09-17-2007, 06:37 AM
Originally posted by mortoma:
I also heard ( or read ) that the main gear are trailing and can "turn" a little side to side, thus helping when you land crabbed into a crosswind. The wheels simply take the side load in stride. Is that true?? I'd also like to know if there is a top cover for the canopy. Sure would suck flying open in the winter, but great in the summer on hot days.

The main gear doesn't swivel or caster (a common misconception), though Fred Weick said that the mains may flex a little under load. Cessna used to sell a castering main gear for the 195 taildragger, but I've never seen one. The canopy on the first coupes consisted of two sheets of plexiglass that slide down to open (not unlike the side of the P-38 canopy). Also offered is one made of three pieces of plexi, one tinted that slides from side to side for entry and then acts as a sunshade overhead in flight.

A pair of prescription sunglasses resides in a field somewhere in Michigan. Thus I discovered not to look back over my outboard shoulder with the canopy open!

A few Ercoupe sites:
http://www.ercoupe.org/
http://www.ercoupe.net/

Esel1964, the same for me, I saw one at Oshkosh as a kid and it was love at first sight. It's a great little plane!

buzzsaw1939
09-17-2007, 10:25 AM
erco... It appears you are correct, now I'm curious what I saw back in the fiftys, looking at the pictures, and being a designer, I can only assume what I saw was a modification, I remember a short trailing bar on each main, with spings on each side, one would assume it had a small castering effect. it looked kind of squirly to me! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

erco415
09-17-2007, 02:32 PM
Originally posted by buzzsaw1939:
erco... It appears you are correct, now I'm curious what I saw back in the fiftys, looking at the pictures, and being a designer, I can only assume what I saw was a modification, I remember a short trailing bar on each main, with spings on each side, one would assume it had a small castering effect. it looked kind of squirly to me! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Hmm, looking at the photo of my plane (above), I've seen some folks replace the rubber donuts that provide the shock absorbtion with springs, but I've never seen one with springs on the trailing link itself. Of course, you were looking at one in the golden days of STC's, when almost any modification could be approved. I wonder too...?

Waldo.Pepper
09-17-2007, 03:07 PM
For fellow Ercoupe fans. Rocket assisted takeoff. Looks like fun. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:NASA_GPN-2000-001538.jpg

erco415
09-17-2007, 05:29 PM
Great link Waldo! And that poor old Porterfield is just getting it's tail up... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/touche.gif

At the conclusion of the JATO tests, they did one more flight with the prop removed, thus making the first manned flight by rocket power alone.

Ah, the good old days. Many was the civil bird that had fittings for auxiliary rockets...!