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View Full Version : Pilots in the pacific spent much time in their planes! Why?



F19_Ob
06-08-2004, 08:13 AM
This is why!

http://www.defence.gov.au/news/raafnews/editions/4515/images/17-75%20Sqn%20P40%20at%20MB.jpg

Who the heck wants to get out into this?

Just if U wondered why. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
http://www.defence.gov.au/news/raafnews/editions/4515/history/story01.htm

F19_Ob
06-08-2004, 08:13 AM
This is why!

http://www.defence.gov.au/news/raafnews/editions/4515/images/17-75%20Sqn%20P40%20at%20MB.jpg

Who the heck wants to get out into this?

Just if U wondered why. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
http://www.defence.gov.au/news/raafnews/editions/4515/history/story01.htm

Doug_Thompson
06-08-2004, 08:15 AM
Have you read "Fire in the sky?" It gives a graphic description of the misery in the SW Pacific.

Everybody had malaria, for instance. It was just a matter of degree.

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Proud Charter Member of the Do-Do Birds Luftwhiners Chorus

spiffalski
06-08-2004, 08:30 AM
Yeah well malaria is better than dysyntery.
Which is what the infantry got.

Who wrote "fire in the sky"?

Cippacometa
06-08-2004, 08:48 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by spiffalski:
Yeah well malaria is better than dysyntery.
Which is what the infantry got.

Who wrote "fire in the sky"?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'd rather prefer dysentery to malaria, since the dysentery is reversible while malaria stays in your blood forever. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

The author is Eric M. Bergerud.
Some nice tales about the rude conditions of the Pacific Theatre are also in Boyingotn's book "Baa Baa Black Sheep": he had some ear infections that caused pus fill his auditory canal (the doctor cleaned it daily in order to make him hear); he had also his body full of sores due to the extreme heat and humidity.

geetarman
06-08-2004, 09:15 AM
Reading "Fire in the Sky" made me believe that the Southwest PAcific theater was the worst place in the world to be a pilot. Add up the absolutely horrible conditions, constant bombardment in some areas, difficult maintenance situation and illness that was rampant, you would not want to be there.

My father served in the US Army during WWII in the Phillipines and the Ryukus and that, though still harsh, was nowhere near the SWP

Capt._Tenneal
06-08-2004, 09:21 AM
And here I thought it was because of the air conditioning and fully stocked wet bar in the planes. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

TgD Thunderbolt56
06-08-2004, 10:58 AM
There are many descriptions of the pilots loving it when they actually got to fly. It was an escape from the humidity, heat, insects and many other forms of discomfort.

I can imagine how difficult it must have been to start your approach and have the windows fog from the humidity and the sweat start to pour again as your descent brought you below 1000m and into the heat blanket.



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horseback
06-08-2004, 12:19 PM
Pilots got dysentary too, they just didn't talk about it too much. Imagine trying to explain to your crew chief what that brown fluid sloshing around on the floorboards is... as if he didn't know.

Flying all over the Pacific with no place to go, if you get my drift.

One of my uncles once said that the reason he hated the Japanese was because he had to... "fight them in all the &lt;crappiest&gt; places in the world."

cheers

horseback

"Here's your new Mustangs, boys. You can learn to fly'em on the way to the target. Cheers!" -LTCOL Don Blakeslee, 4th FG CO, February 27th, 1944