PDA

View Full Version : Technology, How far should it go?



Airmail109
12-09-2007, 06:05 PM
I'd like to hear other peoples opinions. Your own expirences of technology etc, how its shaped your life. Positives and negatives. Has it altered society more for the better or worse.

I was watching "Thats 70s Show" the other day, and it kind reminded me of a feeling I last got in the 90s bearing in mind I never knew the 70s. When friend circles were a lot more closely knit and personal. Within the past 7-8 years theres been a boom in the internet etc and it seems now that people are living in a perverse way (with mobiles and IM) more distant lives. Its kind of hard to describe.

Its also made me realize how starkly different even a lot of European countries, say Spain and Greece are to Britain. From visiting them I noticed people are a hell of a lot more sociable.

leitmotiv
12-09-2007, 06:24 PM
How people think is vastly more significant than technology---though the exponents of technology will never believe this.

Cajun76
12-09-2007, 06:29 PM
You can have my Palm Treo 680 when you pry it from my cold, dead fingers!

SeaFireLIV
12-09-2007, 06:30 PM
The `70s was certainly a more sociable place. (old man mode)

We never had computers or consoles (they came in when I started college at around 19, consoles much later). For me it was a lot of board games or Action stuff like lots of toy soldiers and tanks with aircraft. These things you almost never played alone but went round to friends to join with them. There were also plenty of run around wargames we played all day, every day round the block.

Even then I wasn`t as much of an outgoing person 9as art was my main thing), but friends still managed to drag me out.

Even later, when we did do computer games, they were computer games at Arcades where you`d be surrounded by other teenagers watching you make that massive score. So you still were out.

I think that modern technology has done great things, but has also made people much more insular and selfish to some point and more whiny too.

This is why I waited a long time before letting my daughter go on the internet so that she would have `normal` friends first and get used to going out a bit, but even now i see she has no problem sitting there on it all day. It`s one thing for me as an adult, but I think it`s dangerous for kids and so I control how much she`s on it per week.

It`s better to get out, especially when you`re young.

berg417448
12-09-2007, 06:41 PM
Cell phones are the root of all evil! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

HotelBushranger
12-09-2007, 07:45 PM
Dang technology! If we could have it my way, hell people would be running through the streets playing stick ball, and building cubby houses only to come home when the street lights come on!

Computers promote seriousness over playfulness, and distance over closeness. Bad in my opinion, although for us young'uns they've been around us for our entire lives so we've come to integrate them into our lives.

Divine-Wind
12-09-2007, 07:51 PM
I'd say technology is good and bad. Good in that it makes life easier and more comfortable, while at the same time life goes at a faster place in places crammed to the toilet lid with wires and gadgets, and we don't have as much time to enjoy things, or so it seems to me.

Every cloud may have a silver lining, but every silver lining has a cloud. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Cajun76
12-09-2007, 07:52 PM
Originally posted by berg417448:
Cell phones are the root of all evil! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Come get some.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/i_treo_narrowweb02.jpg


http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

ElAurens
12-09-2007, 08:09 PM
I remember when we only had two TV stations, and they went off the air at midnight.

I also remember the very first color TV in our area, my father bought it. People would come over just to watch it, didn't matter what was on.

Also remember when most cars didn't have air conditioning or power windows. Or stereo radios for that matter, and a heater was still optional on some lower end models.

VW-IceFire
12-09-2007, 10:05 PM
Grew up in this technological age...had first exposure to a computer at the age of 3 (it was a Commodore 64) so I don't really know a world that wasn't heavily technology influenced. It does seem that we're more narcissistic and out of touch now than ever before. Being out of touch with ourselves is particularly ironic since we can be in touch with everyone virtually...

Science fiction has written many times that in any tech oriented society there will eventually be a counter culture group that forms around technology or having too much of it. SF is usually right http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Still we wouldn't even be having this conversation if it weren't for technology. And I wouldn't have the job that I do without computers and internet technology. Ultimately the advent of the computer and the internet is all thanks to a few people trying to find a better way to shoot down airplanes back in World War II.

The one thing I find some level of both comfort and fear in is that the more things change the more they stay the same.

Monty_Thrud
12-10-2007, 06:55 AM
I must admit to loving some aspects of modern life, CD's, PC's, DvD's and teh t'internet rock. I hated tapes, whether audio or video but loved vinyl records, you felt like you'd bought something special, it's a shame the record companies took so long to catch up with the rest of the world as far as d/ling.

I still don't understand the fascination with mobile phones and texting, i use one just for a quick response to mates or GF whereabouts to meet up but don't spend 20 mins chatting to them, i use the pub for that.

Breeze147
12-10-2007, 07:05 AM
Originally posted by Monty_Thrud:
I must admit to loving some aspects of modern life, CD's, PC's, DvD's and teh t'internet rock. I hated tapes, whether audio or video but loved vinyl records, you felt like you'd bought something special, it's a shame the record companies took so long to catch up with the rest of the world as far as d/ling.

I still don't understand the fascination with mobile phones and texting, i use one just for a quick response to mates or GF whereabouts to meet up but don't spend 20 mins chatting to them, i use the pub for that.

Trying to thread a reel to reel tape deck while stoned was a character building experience.

Monty_Thrud
12-10-2007, 07:12 AM
I didn't mind reel to reel(you had hours of music), it was those pesky small c60/c90/ and especially c120 audio tapes that went in your hi-fi's, you'd spend ages recording your favourite tunes, only to have them get chewed up. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

I also had/have a 8 track player, now those are difficult to fix tape wise. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

SeaFireLIV
12-10-2007, 07:31 AM
Originally posted by Monty_Thrud:
I didn't mind reel to reel(you had hours of music), it was those pesky small c60/c90/ and especially c120 audio tapes that went in your hi-fi's, you'd spend ages recording your favourite tunes, only to have them get chewed up. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

I also had/have a 8 track player, now those are difficult to fix tape wise. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

It was the c120s that I hated most.

But they do last a while. I still have a bag of D90s from that time. LOL. There`s some funny kid stuff on it still. I now what I sounded like when I was 19... embarrassing...

I do notice the hiss big time though.

I even used to have some great 12 inch records and albums, but long gone now...

han freak solo
12-10-2007, 08:49 AM
Originally posted by SeaFireLIV:
The `70s was certainly a more sociable place. (old man mode)

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

My 1st and 3rd cars had 8-track players. cr@p pure cr@p. Nothin' worse than a long song fading out, with a BIG @SS CLUNK changing to program 4, then the song fading back in.

When I was a kid, my family actually had an Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser just like on "That '70s show". My brother and me would sit in the far back with the rear window rolled down spittin' outside at highway speeds, just to have the spit come right back at us. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

As far as a more social decade (1970's), I guess so in the more developed countries. Less technology tends to bring people together, physically. Even in the '80s and '90s I spent more time with family and friends because I had a lot less technology than now.

I still haven't purchased a cell phone. Ever. Unfortunately, my company has made sure I've had one since 1997. I kinda miss the days when I got my work done quickly and efficiently. Cell phones just make me an inefficient multi-tasker.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

As far as the USA, I contribute the staggering obesity problem on technology and abundance of money for the tons of food available.

Besides power windows, new cars have powered sliding doors, power lifting doors, power lowering seats, etc. We really only have to lift a finger to operate a vehicle. Most people on my street don't even mow their yards anymore, but that's not due to technology, just the way our culture is now. I guess, if you have the money, pay someone else to do it.

Due to my lack of real exercise I'm a fat blob in a thin person. My only exercise at age 42, is yardwork with a push mower, bicycling, my repair job, playing with my kids, and wrestling with the wife. I'm a pretty lazy bastid, now. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

han freak solo
12-10-2007, 10:50 AM
http://www.dansgarage.net/cars4sale/68%20oldsvista.jpg

-HH-Quazi
12-10-2007, 11:25 AM
I used to have to stand outside & turn the TV antenna for hours on end so my dad could switch between the only two channels we could pick up in order to watch two different baseball games, screaming at each other through an open window in order to hear when to start & stop turning the bloody pole. Then in the mid 70's we finally got a device that would automatically turn the damn thing itself.

I remember going from 20' phone cords to a cordless deal in the 80's. And going from 8-tracks to cassettes for music. Played Atari Tennis for hours on end. Crazy man!

Messaschnitzel
12-10-2007, 11:26 AM
Technology makes things more convenient, but not necessarily easier. A direct result is that it shapes or alters the way we behave, perceive, and act with both positive and negative results.

One of supposed benefits is to give us the ability to have more leisure time. Anyone remember the old "Popular Science" mag articles about how humans will not have to work or need currency anymore in the future because of robotic automation? That hasn't happened yet that I can observe. Instead of more leisure time, the time that is saved is used for more production in whatever occupation you pick, and this includes the time that one spends at home.
("I never have enough time in the day to do everything that I need to get done. - I need a "Mother's Little Helper" right now.")

The world of technology is making the world a sped-up and smaller place, and people can only go so fast. What used to take a longer, but reasonable amount of time for a written report or a manufactured product is being demanded at an ever diminishing rate. To exaggerate the point, the customer ordered the product today and wants a 3 month product delivered yesterday.

Don't get me wrong here, I realize that this "trend" has been going on since people have been inventing things. What I find disconcerting is that technology is becoming increasingly exponential in development, and that I am seeing and reading about more and more instances of people's run-ins and abuses with the "new" technology. I read about people's home life deteriorating because of cell phone, pager, or instant messaging intrusions. marathon gamers kicking the bucket while playing. A girl that commits suicide because of an online relationship that went sour. Her parents come to find that the mother of a girl that their daughter did not get along with created a fake "MySpace" profile and proceeded to attack the girl, with supposedly unintentional results. Am I outraged? No. Am I amazed? Yeah. I believe in personal responsibility, and that too much of of anything can damage or kill you.

The technology called the "Internet" can be a great way to meet people around the world, increase your knowledge, and even make purchases from the convenience of your own home. It amazes me that people can develop actual relationships with someone that they have never met or have seen in person. People can actually be swindled into giving money to someone that they only know from the internet.

With the anonymous nature of the internet, people can become anything they want. Fictitious personas and lives can be created at the keyboard. Adults can become children, Children can become adults, Women can become men, and men can become women. All can come with complete biographies and be whatever that they want write. A good movie that illustrates this point has Robin Williams developing a relationship with someone he has never met in person:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0448075/synopsis

I have always treated the internet as if I was at the counter of a truck stop having coffee and striking up a conversation with the stranger sitting next to me. Chances are, I'll never see this person again in my life.

The upshot is that some of the technology in the late 20th and early 21st centuries might be a bit incompatible with adapting to human nature and vice versa. Imagine how everything would go to heck with a virtual reality IL2 sim that is indistinguishable from real life. I think that some people will have their sim equipment in the bathroom with the toilet as their pilot seat.

It will give a whole new meaning to "hit the silk"! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

han freak solo
12-10-2007, 11:30 AM
Originally posted by han freak solo:
Due to my lack of real exercise ........

Ooooh, I forgot about disc golf. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif

A great slacker sport. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

http://www.goaltimate.com/images/Drivinguphill-vi.jpg

DuxCorvan
12-10-2007, 12:09 PM
Well, in Spain had but 2 TV channels (public) up to 1990. And I saw them in B&W until 1988. It was about the same time that my bro & me (17 year-old) had our first PC: an Amstrad 1512 with B&W CGA monitor, no HD, 512k RAM and a single floppy unit of 5,25" (360k each disk, we had to swap disks several times with every 'copy' DOS command.)

Until then I was one of the few lucky who had an Atari 2600 console, but soon came to envy my cousin who had a Spectrum 48k with a cassette unit...

Cell phones were strange things big as a brick and expensive as a small car, till the 1990s. I didn't have one till 1997, and it's the one I liked most, for all the new ones are full of features and gadgets I never use at all...

In fact, I was happier when cell phones didn't exist. You could 'disappear' without an excuse whenever you needed it, you could arrive late home and say you didn't find a working phone-box. Now jealous partners, too protective parents and ruthless bosses can find their victims wherever they are and force them to be constantly at hand, like a private domestic & wearable Big Brother watching over you all the time.

I also miss the times when teens played pinball, cards, billiards and 'table-football' during afternoons in bars that became social clubs, and a site for daily rituals and friendly conversation. Now afternoons are for video gaming and net chatting, and bars are only places where people eat or get drunk later at night, only old men there to play the simple things.

Anyway, as Aimail said at first, things are not as bad here in Spain, because of our traditional outdoor way of living. We like to socialize a lot and spend a lot of hours in the streets. You will rarely find other European country where street life is so active until midnight or even later -even in winter (because in summer, the streets and pubs just get jammed with people).

BTW, the 21st Century kinda let me down... since a kid, 2001 was such a magical date... Where are the sliding-up doors, the laser weapons, the flying cars, the robots, the teletransport devices? I feel quite cheated. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

BrotherVoodoo
12-10-2007, 12:54 PM
Without technology I would not have a job, lol. To watch technology grow for me is also very exciting. Just think what it will be like in 10 or 20 years. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif As it pertains to us, simming will be at a whole new level.

tempest_tamer
12-10-2007, 12:55 PM
recent research discovered that watching much television makes people aggressive because they don't have enough contact anymore with the outer world.
I personally have no TV anymore (moved and then never took the effort of buying a new one).

Maybe PC can have the same effect...

Airmail109
12-10-2007, 03:20 PM
Originally posted by DuxCorvan:
Well, in Spain had but 2 TV channels (public) up to 1990. And I saw them in B&W until 1988. It was about the same time that my bro & me (17 year-old) had our first PC: an Amstrad 1512 with B&W CGA monitor, no HD, 512k RAM and a single floppy unit of 5,25" (360k each disk, we had to swap disks several times with every 'copy' DOS command.)

Until then I was one of the few lucky who had an Atari 2600 console, but soon came to envy my cousin who had a Spectrum 48k with a cassette unit...

Cell phones were strange things big as a brick and expensive as a small car, till the 1990s. I didn't have one till 1997, and it's the one I liked most, for all the new ones are full of features and gadgets I never use at all...

In fact, I was happier when cell phones didn't exist. You could 'disappear' without an excuse whenever you needed it, you could arrive late home and say you didn't find a working phone-box. Now jealous partners, too protective parents and ruthless bosses can find their victims wherever they are and force them to be constantly at hand, like a private domestic & wearable Big Brother watching over you all the time.

I also miss the times when teens played pinball, cards, billiards and 'table-football' during afternoons in bars that became social clubs, and a site for daily rituals and friendly conversation. Now afternoons are for video gaming and net chatting, and bars are only places where people eat or get drunk later at night, only old men there to play the simple things.

Anyway, as Aimail said at first, things are not as bad here in Spain, because of our traditional outdoor way of living. We like to socialize a lot and spend a lot of hours in the streets. You will rarely find other European country where street life is so active until midnight or even later -even in winter (because in summer, the streets and pubs just get jammed with people).

BTW, the 21st Century kinda let me down... since a kid, 2001 was such a magical date... Where are the sliding-up doors, the laser weapons, the flying cars, the robots, the teletransport devices? I feel quite cheated. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

However much I like to wind people up, in silly nation bashing flame fests. I do miss Spain a LOT, for those reasons. I will have to go back to visit sometime soon. Not the touristy parts, I prefer the north. To many brits in other places, You guys must get really pissed with so many of us invading.

Airmail109
12-10-2007, 03:22 PM
Originally posted by BrotherVoodoo:
Without technology I would not have a job, lol. To watch technology grow for me is also very exciting. Just think what it will be like in 10 or 20 years. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif As it pertains to us, simming will be at a whole new level.

You probably would, It would just be a hell of a lot more active. And no I really dread thinking about technology in 20 years time. Put it this way, they say the Playstation 4 will have more processing power than the human brain. Now imagine half decent AI utilising such power, communicating with 100s of millions more of the same AI machines via the internet...instantly. All these machines could integrate and effectively become one giant supercomputer. Imagine a world where machines can outhink the entire human race.

Then theres the fact people will increasingly be becoming more isolated and unsocialbe.

Technology will one day, In fact put lots of humans out of a job.

VW-IceFire
12-10-2007, 03:40 PM
We're still 15-20 years away from inventing a computer with human brain level processing power. Is PS4 going to take that long?

The problem with that metric has long been acknowledged that we keep making computers that can do so many instructions or calculations per second and eventually we'll make one that can do as many instruction in a second as a human but all we've really done is make a fantastic number cruncher. But despite the advances in computer processing power the AI in games is still basically just as dumb as back in the 1980s.

Its a bit more advanced but its just doing the same things it was before...just with more detail. AI is a conundrum. True AI I think is quite a ways away yet.

joeap
12-10-2007, 04:05 PM
Geez it's not all bad guys, honestly if some of you were coherent you'd "shut your computers off and never turn on again".

Considering Aimail's point, I think culture has a lot to do with how technology is received. I had the impression Mediterranean cultures were always more sociable than Northern Europeans for example. This from the perspective of a Canadian kid of Greek parents who grew up in the 70s and 80s and saw: 1) the differences in culture between the "wasp" (Northern and Germanic) old immigrant stock and my own immigrant group and 2) the growth of technology and it's effect on all of us

SeaFireLIV
12-10-2007, 04:23 PM
Originally posted by DuxCorvan:


BTW, the 21st Century kinda let me down... since a kid, 2001 was such a magical date... Where are the sliding-up doors, the laser weapons, the flying cars, the robots, the teletransport devices? I feel quite cheated. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Were you a 2000AD fan?

I also expected flying cars, servo bots and laser weapons too by the year 2001.

The reality is such a downer. We don`t even have semi-intelligent hoovers!

Airmail109
12-10-2007, 04:49 PM
Originally posted by SeaFireLIV:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by DuxCorvan:


BTW, the 21st Century kinda let me down... since a kid, 2001 was such a magical date... Where are the sliding-up doors, the laser weapons, the flying cars, the robots, the teletransport devices? I feel quite cheated. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Were you a 2000AD fan?

I also expected flying cars, servo bots and laser weapons too by the year 2001.

The reality is such a downer. We don`t even have semi-intelligent hoovers! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Dont we have semi-intelligent women?

DuxCorvan
12-10-2007, 04:54 PM
Originally posted by Aimail101:
Not the touristy parts, I prefer the north.

Though living in Cádiz now, I'm from Santander, in the N coast.
http://www.estudiosmoreno.net/galeria/data/media/5/piquio.jpg


You guys must get really pissed with so many of us invading.

Nah, just the ugly half... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

In fact, I have some nice British friends around here. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Messaschnitzel
12-10-2007, 05:28 PM
Originally posted by Aimail101:

Technology will one day, In fact put lots of humans out of a job.

Also consider that a lot of skills have been and are being lost due to technological advances. For example: hand held calculators have replaced the slide rule calculator, aka, the "slipstick". Back in the early 1970's, my father would prove that he could beat anyone using an electronic caculator against his slide rule along with a pencil and paper. I don't know of too many people other than the elderly who still know how to use one. Younger generations do not know what it is, or what it looks like. Even though I occasionally still use a slide rule to keep in practice, I mainly use an electronic calculator because they are faster.

Another example is the metalworking industry. CNC machine tools have replaced manual equipment and for a good reason. The time spent producing a part has been reduced dramatically. Unfortunately, the manual skills are not being taught anymore. I have known a good number of younger CNC machinists who are great at operating their machines, but who do not have any of the skills needed to operate the manual side. Fortunately, I am of the generation that learned how to operate both manual and CNC machines.

Now, we rely on digital technology and have forgotten through lack of use the basic thinking skills such as applicable mathematical formulae used in manufacturing. I know of younger draftsmen who have never used a triangle and T-square, but are wizards with AUTOCAD programs.

A bit off topic, but I think that there is a connection here: Before, there were many high school programs and vocational trade schools teaching and preparing young people for a life long, successful potential career in whatever field that they chose. They taught a no nonsense, proven, and straight to the point of being able to get a job when you graduated education. I remember the junior high and senior high school that I attended in Texas offered plumbing, welding, air conditioning and heating, carpentry, and machine shop. Try finding that now here in the United States.

I think that somewhere along the line we have because of technology and society, have become the "Rome" of our time and are content as long as we have our "bread, cicuses, plasma tv, and Ipods". I have neighbors that have children of various ages who spend an incredible amount time on the internet each day, and don't do a whole lot else, other than watch TV and mess around with their electronic gadgets. Some of these kids have no applicable skills in anything other than using computers, and are in no way prepared for a life after they reach adulthood at age 18. Unfortunately, their parents do not have the money to send them to college. These kids are not stupid, but are unmotivated and have not had to work for someone else in their life. Welcome to the world of the service industry. (Oops! I veered into the offtopic ditch again..)

What is the educational/vocational situation for the countries of the people here on the forum?

Maybe what the earth needs is a worldwide EMP every now and then! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

Sillius_Sodus
12-10-2007, 05:41 PM
Eight track tape players....ahhhh, fond memories.
Here's a bit of trivia, the eight track was invented by Bill Lear, the designer of the Learjet.

Good hunting,
Sillius_Sodus

Korolov1986
12-10-2007, 05:42 PM
It's because of technology that I was able to regain what I had once lost.

It's because of technology that I didn't go completely ape-**** at school and went off to the loony bin.

It's because of technology that I'm even here in the first place.

So yeah, I have no qualms or regrets about where we've been and where we're going. Bring on nanotech and the FUTURE, baby!

M4Sherman4
12-10-2007, 05:42 PM
Originally posted by DuxCorvan:
Well, in Spain had but 2 TV channels (public) up to 1990. And I saw them in B&W until 1988. It was about the same time that my bro & me (17 year-old) had our first PC: an Amstrad 1512 with B&W CGA monitor, no HD, 512k RAM and a single floppy unit of 5,25" (360k each disk, we had to swap disks several times with every 'copy' DOS command.)

Until then I was one of the few lucky who had an Atari 2600 console, but soon came to envy my cousin who had a Spectrum 48k with a cassette unit...

Cell phones were strange things big as a brick and expensive as a small car, till the 1990s. I didn't have one till 1997, and it's the one I liked most, for all the new ones are full of features and gadgets I never use at all...

In fact, I was happier when cell phones didn't exist. You could 'disappear' without an excuse whenever you needed it, you could arrive late home and say you didn't find a working phone-box. Now jealous partners, too protective parents and ruthless bosses can find their victims wherever they are and force them to be constantly at hand, like a private domestic & wearable Big Brother watching over you all the time.

I also miss the times when teens played pinball, cards, billiards and 'table-football' during afternoons in bars that became social clubs, and a site for daily rituals and friendly conversation. Now afternoons are for video gaming and net chatting, and bars are only places where people eat or get drunk later at night, only old men there to play the simple things.

Anyway, as Aimail said at first, things are not as bad here in Spain, because of our traditional outdoor way of living. We like to socialize a lot and spend a lot of hours in the streets. You will rarely find other European country where street life is so active until midnight or even later -even in winter (because in summer, the streets and pubs just get jammed with people).

BTW, the 21st Century kinda let me down... since a kid, 2001 was such a magical date... Where are the sliding-up doors, the laser weapons, the flying cars, the robots, the teletransport devices? I feel quite cheated. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

I through minw in the washer and it came out of the spin cycle fine now I have no excuss for getting home late

M4Sherman4
12-10-2007, 05:56 PM
I am 15 and spend a fair amount of time on my comp but that dose'nt mean I don't have any skills.75% of the stuff I own I bought with MY own money that I earned(I don't get an allowance).At the age of 10 I did more work then most of the 16 year old that lived around me. There parents gave them A computer for sitting on there @$$.mine Told me about a guy that needed some furniture moved or about someone needing a landscaping crew.I was jealous that they were just givin everything.But now those 16 year old are now 21 livin with there parents playing warcraft all day and don't know what work is. so I believe technology is not the problem I think it is Parents not willing to Tell the babys no...But it could just be me.

Messaschnitzel
12-10-2007, 06:10 PM
Originally posted by M4Sherman4:
I am 15 and spend a fair amount of time on my comp but that dose'nt mean I don't have skills. 75% of the stuff I own I bought with MY money that I earned(I don't get an allowance). At the age of 10 I did more work then most 16 year old around me. there parents gave them I computer for sitting on there @$$ mine Told me about I guy that needed some furniture moved. I was A little jealous at that time But those 16 year old are now 21 living with there parents playing warcraft all day and don't know what work is. so I believe technology is not the problem I think it is Parents not willing to Tell the babys no...But it could just be me. now I have to go thank my Parents for teaching me what A Good can come of a hard days work

Out of curiosity, what nationality are you?

M4Sherman4
12-10-2007, 06:19 PM
The souther United States.We have our own dialect http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif .

Messaschnitzel
12-10-2007, 06:28 PM
Originally posted by M4Sherman4:
United States(south part)

Thanks. I was wondering if English is your first language due to your writing style and punctuation.

M4Sherman4
12-10-2007, 06:56 PM
I only got 2 hours of sleep last night so shut it.

Messaschnitzel
12-10-2007, 07:04 PM
Originally posted by M4Sherman4:
I only got 2 hours of sleep last night so shut it

You forgot to punctuate again.

Messaschnitzel
12-10-2007, 07:57 PM
Originally posted by M4Sherman4:
I only got 2 hours of sleep last night so shut it

Seriously, I read that you are 15 years old. That's 3 years from legal adulthood. It is a fact that you will be judged by the way you write, speak, and appear to others. This will be a big factor in getting a good job later. I know this because I had to go through this situation myself, and this is with only a high school education.

I think that there is some truth in my previous post about the educational/vocational situation.

IBTL

ImpStarDuece
12-10-2007, 08:15 PM
Originally posted by Aimail101:

Technology will one day, In fact put lots of humans out of a job.

In fact, technology tends to do the opposite. Most of the white collar service jobs today (telecommunications, IT, publishing ect) could not exist without the current levels of technology.

I certainly couldn't do my job, which relies heavily on a stream of current news from the internet and communication with executives in other countries via email and VOIP, without it. In fact, I suspect that the vast majority of professionals in my building would be unable to work without the current level of communications technology.

I recall an article that stated 1 in 4 jobs currently worked in the Developed World did not even exist 50 years ago, and that 1 out of 6 new jobs in the next 20 years will rely on technology not in common use or not invented at the moment.

han freak solo
12-10-2007, 08:34 PM
Originally posted by Messaschnitzel:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by M4Sherman4:
I only got 2 hours of sleep last night so shut it

Seriously, I read that you are 15 years old. That's 3 years from legal adulthood. It is a fact that you will be judged by the way you write, speak, and appear to others. This will be a big factor in getting a good job later. I know this because I had to go through this situation myself, and this is with only a high school education.

I think that there is some truth in my previous post about the educational/vocational situation.

IBTL </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Weirdly enough, writing seems lost even from the younger college grads I know.

My boss' son is in his lower 30's and makes a great living working IT with an unspeakable credit card company. His writing style is a reflection of his environment. Which means his writing style is of no capitalization, hardly and grammar to speak of and shortcuts to spelling due to a culture of texting. He's not in the minority either.

I know if I was held to the standards of my parents time when penmanship was graded I would fail. My hands are so crampy from work, I have to write in caps to be legible. I guess writing well is falling away like penmanship did. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

Ernst_Rohr
12-10-2007, 10:31 PM
If it wasnt for technology, I wouldnt have a job!

I work in IT, and I consider it a mixed blessing. I love the fact that technology is never boring, and its always changing and adapting. At the same time, I see a lot of same stupid mistakes being made by people who think
technology is a magic wand and they can just buy it and wave it and *poof* things are better.

Not so.

Writing being a good point. IM is killing written English on both sides of the pond, and quite frankly, no one really seems to care. It bothers me, but then again, its not the first time its happened.

RegRag1977
12-11-2007, 07:08 AM
Originally posted by ImpStarDuece:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Aimail101:

Technology will one day, In fact put lots of humans out of a job.

In fact, technology tends to do the opposite. Most of the white collar service jobs today (telecommunications, IT, publishing ect) could not exist without the current levels of technology.

Yep...

But will these white collar service jobs be able to absorb the vast majority of blue collars that have been replaced by machines?

I doubt so. I think Aimail is right.

Anyway, technology will soon or later be able to do the white collar jobs. To me it's just a matter of time. But, i can be wrong...

Life could disappear from the surface of the Earth long before we reach this technological level.

Kauzio
12-11-2007, 07:24 AM
Originally posted by VW-IceFire:
We're still 15-20 years away from inventing a computer with human brain level processing power. Is PS4 going to take that long?

The problem with that metric has long been acknowledged that we keep making computers that can do so many instructions or calculations per second and eventually we'll make one that can do as many instruction in a second as a human but all we've really done is make a fantastic number cruncher. But despite the advances in computer processing power the AI in games is still basically just as dumb as back in the 1980s.

Its a bit more advanced but its just doing the same things it was before...just with more detail. AI is a conundrum. True AI I think is quite a ways away yet.
I have a degree in AI, and I endorse this post. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

*knowitall mode*

AI is very slow evolving. AI has improved since the 1980s with new techniques, more efficiency and more processing power, but not a great deal.

Today's processing power is beginning to allow for successes in AI, but not usually in things that people think are AI. For example, game AI is pretty stagnant, with newer games maybe doing things slightly different or slightly more complicated, but it's basically no different to before.

On the other hand, there's AI in all sorts of computer systmems, from aircraft to cameras with face detection in. The latter is something that's only really been possible over the last few years, with advances in computer vision algorithms.

The problem with creating a human-like intelligence is that computers are nothing like the brain. The brain is a massively parallel computer. It dwarfs Aimail's doomsday scenario of 100million PS4s. We're talking tens to hundreds of billions of neurons in the brain.

When a computer can do 10 billion parallel computations, then I think we can build a really cool, true artificial intelligence. You'd have to ask an electronic engineer if a 10 billion parallel processing machine will be available in 15-20 years, but I have my doubts.

Forget Aimail's terminator scenarios though, they are impossible and silly!

Also the idea that the PS4 will have more processing power than the human brain is pretty insulting (and nonsense!).

Not that I'm dissing you Aimail, just think you have an overactive imagination :P
I wouldn't have a job if it wasn't for technology, and neither would a lot of people in Britain. In fact, depending on your cut-off point for how far back you allow technology, nobody would have a job...

SeaFireLIV
12-11-2007, 07:52 AM
Originally posted by Kauzio:

I wouldn't have a job if it wasn't for technology, and neither would a lot of people in Britain. In fact, depending on your cut-off point for how far back you allow technology, nobody would have a job...

Oh, you`d have a job. It would probabaly not be the job you`d really want...

Peasant working the fields for the Landowner from dawn till dusk, soldier (there`s always space for cannon-fodder), dye maker, dung-keeper, pig farmer, Car driver (the one with horses) etc, etc or if you were luckier, Scribe, Minister, baron land owner.

They`d be work alright. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

LEBillfish
12-11-2007, 08:09 AM
All this new technology is driving me nuts....Wherein before I'd just pick up the receiver and state the name of the person I wanted to speak with, now I have to spin that stupid dial and have a number...

Worse still, what ever happened to fingers and toes, these fancy new slide rules are a b*tch!

Pumping gas bad enough, now they don't even show you how much gas you took out of the glass scale, yet you now have to watch the numbers roll, pretty dumb considering it took very little coal to keep the boiler going in the reliable steamer.....Pneumatic tires? How stupid!....I never got a flat with solid rubber.

Wings?....How dangerous is that, what a dumb idea like we're birds or some such....Everyone knows "hydrogen" balloons are the safest form of air travel if you're dumb enough to fly....I bet only 1 in 10 will survive that fad.

p.s......What happened to all the sails on ships?....They go back to oars or something?

RegRag1977
12-11-2007, 08:22 AM
Thanks to the technology we have the jobs we really want, as long as we are working in the rich countries (working there is for sure the most representative, only rich humans are real human beings http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif)

ex by Pr Ruth Pearson:

Musculoskeletal; this includes a range of named disorders of the neck, upper limbs, shoulders and back, including tenosynovitis, tendinitis, peritendinitis, bursitis, epicondylitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, dupuytren's contracture, writers' cramp, ganglions, and cervicobrachial disorders (Putz-Anderson, 1988(a); Huws, 1987). These conditions are not identical with the list of thirty separate diseases in the International Classification of Disease Codes, which includes carpal tunnel syndrome, cervicobrachial syndrome, tenosynovitis, and ganglions (cysts), but which makes no mention of repetitive strain injury (Putz-Anderson, 1988(b): p. 601).

2 Deterioration of and problems with visual capacity, including eyestrain and fatigue, loss of focus and mobility, reduction in capacity to dilate pupils. and cataracts (ibid.). The symptoms linked to eye strain include blurred and double vision, irritability, headaches and migraines, nausea, and discomfort with contact lenses (DeMatteo, 1985).

3 Stress and fatigue; symptoms include short-term problems of fatigue, irritability, depression, headaches, migraine, insomnia, menstrual problems, and accidents, and long-term problems of heart disease, high blood pressure, depression, anxiety, dermatitis, ulcers and fertility problems.

4 Skin complaints including rosacea, acne, dermatitis, telangiectases, pustolosis, urticaria, ostitis and other unspecified changes (ibid.:, and Berg et al., 1990).

5 Reproductive hazards; miscarriages, congenital deformities and fertility problems associated with stress and with emissions of ionising and nonionising radiation from cathode ray tubes fitted in now obsolete computer monitors (Labour Research, 1984; DeMatteo, 1985; Brandt and Nielsen, 1990).


http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif and i'm not even talking about how technology change the working habits of millions of young women working in sweat shops and other delocalized facilities. (lead paint, chemical vapours...etc...). Children too like technology at work... For sure.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif Technology has helped greatly to create cheap labour in underdevelopped countries, but as i said, those people are often not considered like real human beings...

AS long as we have good jobs http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

x6BL_Brando
12-11-2007, 08:43 AM
You can pick up a stick and light a fire to cook by, or you can drape a cloth over it and make a shelter, or you can club someone to death with it. It's still just a stick.
It's not the technology, it's what we do with it. It has its uses (http://forum.1cpublishing.eu/showthread.php?t=2382)

On that topic, I have to hope I don't run into a ward orderly with an NVQ in Computing from night-school, who just wants to make a few simple mods http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
I'll keep my stick ready!

B

Airmail109
12-11-2007, 10:22 AM
Originally posted by ImpStarDuece:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Aimail101:

Technology will one day, In fact put lots of humans out of a job.

In fact, technology tends to do the opposite. Most of the white collar service jobs today (telecommunications, IT, publishing ect) could not exist without the current levels of technology.

I certainly couldn't do my job, which relies heavily on a stream of current news from the internet and communication with executives in other countries via email and VOIP, without it. In fact, I suspect that the vast majority of professionals in my building would be unable to work without the current level of communications technology.

I recall an article that stated 1 in 4 jobs currently worked in the Developed World did not even exist 50 years ago, and that 1 out of 6 new jobs in the next 20 years will rely on technology not in common use or not invented at the moment. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

In Japan their working on robots to replace unskilled workers (checkout operaters etc). As there arnt enough stupid people in Japan.

Go figure.

huggy87
12-11-2007, 01:59 PM
We are all so much better educated nowadays...

In a way that is good because it is harder for companies to get away with crappy products.

But, on the other hand, I feel like I have to do my homework for every little purchase. I read reviews, peruse forums, etc. Sometimes I miss the days of buying one product over another because it had the prettiest box.

han freak solo
12-11-2007, 04:00 PM
Originally posted by huggy87:
Sometimes I miss the days of buying one product over another because it had the prettiest box.

Same goes for picking women. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

SeaFireLIV
12-11-2007, 04:42 PM
Originally posted by huggy87:
We are all so much better educated nowadays...

In a way that is good because it is harder for companies to get away with crappy products.

But, on the other hand, I feel like I have to do my homework for every little purchase. I read reviews, peruse forums, etc. Sometimes I miss the days of buying one product over another because it had the prettiest box.

I was going to say. Most women will still pick something cos it looks nice rather than what`s in it. look how many laptops sell because they look `nice`, but can barely run anything.

I reckon most fellas go for what it can do first and think how it looks second. well I do anyway. For instance, my PC looks rubbish from the outside, but it`s a pretty decent powerhouse inside and that`s what matters.

Airmail109
12-11-2007, 05:41 PM
PS3 is 35 times more powerfull than the PS2. Sony claim that its processing ability is equal to 1 percent of the human brain.

This is like the beggining of a bad Yakov Smirnoff knock-off joke. In Sony America PS6 plays you.

WWSensei
12-11-2007, 06:24 PM
"The Good Old Days" were seldom as good as people remember them.

I love the advancing technology. Yes, I make my living from it. It's allowed me to provide a better life for my children than my parents were able to provide me. I make no apologies for it.

I look back at what my life was like back in the 70s and 80s with disgust and thankful for the technology today. As for the statement that it "puts people out of jobs" you should research that topic. It's a common myth that has been debunked many times. In fact, one classic study was the garment and fabric industry in India where technological advances were shunned by the world renowned Indian fabric makers (one of Ghandi's colossal failures he advocated). The end result was other nations surpassed India and they suffered years of a collapsed economy. The American auto industry suffered the same fate when foreign cars--made in more efficient factories--nearly put the big auto makers out of business. The list goes on.

My only complaint is I wish I was already into the next decade so I can see what else is new.

Airmail109
12-11-2007, 06:37 PM
Originally posted by WWSensei:
"The Good Old Days" were seldom as good as people remember them.

I love the advancing technology. Yes, I make my living from it. It's allowed me to provide a better life for my children than my parents were able to provide me. I make no apologies for it.

I look back at what my life was like back in the 70s and 80s with disgust and thankful for the technology today. As for the statement that it "puts people out of jobs" you should research that topic. It's a common myth that has been debunked many times. In fact, one classic study was the garment and fabric industry in India where technological advances were shunned by the world renowned Indian fabric makers (one of Ghandi's colossal failures he advocated). The end result was other nations surpassed India and they suffered years of a collapsed economy. The American auto industry suffered the same fate when foreign cars--made in more efficient factories--nearly put the big auto makers out of business. The list goes on.

My only complaint is I wish I was already into the next decade so I can see what else is new.

So you like the idea of bosses being able to get hold of you 24/7 on your mobile, or the constant barrage of deadlines sent by e-mail. Or the countless sales calls on your landline?

ImpStarDuece
12-11-2007, 06:49 PM
Originally posted by Aimail101:

So you like the idea of bosses being able to get hold of you 24/7 on your mobile, or the constant barrage of deadlines sent by e-mail. Or the countless sales calls on your landline?

I have a very simple solution. At the interview stage, I inform any potential employer that they will be unable to contact me outside of my contracted working hours.

My current employer, who I have worked for 2 years, has neither my personal mobile phone number or my current home phone number.

I have a separate mobile phone for work and business, which comes on at 8 am and is turned off when I leave the office (typically 6.30 pm).

I do not access my work email account outside of working hours, do not own a Blackberry or other communication device such as a page that would allow my employer to contact me.

Technology is a enabler of tasks, designed to make life easier or more efficient. If the piece of hardware you own does not do this, either change the way it is used or get rid of it.

Airmail109
12-11-2007, 06:55 PM
Okay then good points, but how about the loss of vocal and real communication between friends that is happening.

My friends keep in contact through Facebook, or through an instant messaging program. They rarely talk on the phone anymore, and when they do, they sometimes carry on a conversation with someone else on the computer at the same time. This is kind of sad considering most of my friends are around 18-19, even a decade ago this age range would still be hanging out a lot together and going off to do stuff. Now technology has given 18 years olds an excuse to act like married 30 year olds. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

In the past 10-15 years surverys have shown that the amount of close firneds people have has dropped from around 5-6 down to 2. Trust levels have dropped even more.

We don't have enough annoying strangers in our lives.
That's not sarcasm. Annoyance is something you build up a tolerance to, like alcohol or a bad smell. The more we're able to edit the annoyance out of our lives, the less we're able to handle it.

The problem is we've built an awesome, sprawling web of technology meant purely to let us avoid annoying people. Do all your Christmas shopping online and avoid the fat lady ramming her cart into you at Target. Spend $5,000 on a home theater system so you can see movies on a big screen without a toddler kicking the back of your seat. Hell, rent the DVD's from Netflix and you don't even have to spend the 30 seconds with the confused kid working the register at Blockbuster.

Get stuck in the waiting room at the doctor? No way we're striking up a conversation with the smelly old man in the next seat. We'll plug the iPod into our ears and have a text conversation with a friend or play our DS. Filter that annoyance right out of our world.

Now that would be awesome if it were actually possible to keep all of the irritating **** out of your life. But, it's not. It never will be. As long as you have needs, you'll have to deal with people you can't stand from time to time. We're losing that skill, the one that lets us deal with strangers and tolerate their shrill voices and clunky senses of humor and body odor and squeaky shoes. So, what encounters you do have with the outside world, the world you can't control, make you want to go on a screaming crotch-punching spree.

Lots of us were born into towns full of people we couldn't stand. As a kid, maybe you found yourself in an elementary school classroom, packed in with two dozen kids you did not choose and who shared none of your tastes or interests. Maybe you got beat up a lot.

But, you've grown up. And if you're, say, a huge DragonForce fan, you can go find their forum and meet a dozen people just like you. Or even better, start a private room with your favorite few and lock everybody else out. Say goodbye to the tedious, awkward, painful process of dealing with somebody who's truly different. That's another Old World inconvenience, like having to wash your clothes in a creek or wait for a raccoon to wander by the outhouse so you can wipe your *** with it.

The problem is that peacefully dealing with incompatible people is crucial to living in a society. In fact, if you think about it, peacefully dealing with people you can't stand is society. Just people with opposite tastes and conflicting personalities sharing space and cooperating, often through gritted teeth.

Fifty years ago, you had to sit in a crowded room to see a movie. You didn't get to choose; you either did that or you missed the movie. When you got a new car, everyone on the block came and stood in your yard to look it over. You can bet that some of those people were *******s.

Yet, on the whole, people back then were apparently happier in their jobs and more satisfied with their lives. And get this: They had more friends.

That's right. Even though they had almost no ability to filter their peers according to common interests (hell, often you were just friends with the guy who happened to live next door), they still came up with more close friends than we have now-people they could trust.

It turns out, apparently, that after you get over that first irritation, after you shed your shell of "they listen to different music because they wouldn't understand mine" superiority, there's a sort of comfort in needing other people and being needed on a level beyond common interests. It turns out humans are social animals after all. And that ability to suffer fools, to tolerate annoyance, that's literally the one single thing that allows you to function in a world populated by other people who aren't you. Otherwise, you turn emo. Science has proven it.

LEBillfish
12-11-2007, 07:49 PM
Originally posted by SeaFireLIV:
I was going to say. Most women will still pick something cos it looks nice rather than what`s in it. look how many laptops sell because they look `nice`, but can barely run anything.

I reckon most fellas go for what it can do first and think how it looks second. well I do anyway. For instance, my PC looks rubbish from the outside, but it`s a pretty decent powerhouse inside and that`s what matters.

Counterpoint in one word.........

"Relationships"......

Airmail109
12-11-2007, 08:06 PM
An excerpt

"United Kingdom Ministry of Defense buys actual automated flying death machines and puts them under the control of a computer system called "Skynet" (LOLOLOL), Short of actually wrapping their mouths around computer-controlled gun barrels and shouting "All silicon chips are pussies," there is simply no way they could have made this more likely to go drastically, horribly wrong. It's like they're daring the machines to kill us all.

There's a line between tempting fate and dressing up in a low-cut gown, lying on a bed covered in thousand dollar bills and purring "Oh Fate, you big handsome stud." That line is naming your project after something already famous for killing the world. At least the other cases listed above pretended to have non-lethal goals; the biologists didn't call their virus "Anthrax Leprosyton," and even the North Korean government claims the nuclear program is for the good of their people, no matter how face-blisteringly ludicrous that claim may be.

We've always known that a sentient military control computer would eventually kill us all. But we at least assumed it would be because of its soulless black silicon evil. Now it looks like it'll be because of some nerd's idea of a joke. When Skynet (inevitably, we're sure you'll agree) becomes self-aware, it's going to look around and think:

"Hmm, that's a toaster, it toasts things. That's a coffee maker, it makes coffee. I'm a 'Skynet'; I guess I'd better watch these movies and find out what I'm meant to do."

http://cdn-i.dmdentertainment.com/cracked/jp/robo.jpg

Kauzio
12-12-2007, 05:55 AM
Originally posted by Aimail101:
PS3 is 35 times more powerfull than the PS2. Sony claim that its processing ability is equal to 1 percent of the human brain.

This is like the beggining of a bad Yakov Smirnoff knock-off joke. In Sony America PS6 plays you.
Sony's claim is BS http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

WWSensei
12-12-2007, 09:45 AM
Originally posted by Aimail101:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WWSensei:
"The Good Old Days" were seldom as good as people remember them.

I love the advancing technology. Yes, I make my living from it. It's allowed me to provide a better life for my children than my parents were able to provide me. I make no apologies for it.

I look back at what my life was like back in the 70s and 80s with disgust and thankful for the technology today. As for the statement that it "puts people out of jobs" you should research that topic. It's a common myth that has been debunked many times. In fact, one classic study was the garment and fabric industry in India where technological advances were shunned by the world renowned Indian fabric makers (one of Ghandi's colossal failures he advocated). The end result was other nations surpassed India and they suffered years of a collapsed economy. The American auto industry suffered the same fate when foreign cars--made in more efficient factories--nearly put the big auto makers out of business. The list goes on.

My only complaint is I wish I was already into the next decade so I can see what else is new.

So you like the idea of bosses being able to get hold of you 24/7 on your mobile, or the constant barrage of deadlines sent by e-mail. Or the countless sales calls on your landline? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

24/7? Why? I make use of technology so that I don't have to be notified 24/7. Sure, there are days when something odd happens, but 95% of the time I work a normal 40hr week. I support several businesses that employ thousands of people and their jobs.

Deadlines have always existed. It's irrelevant how they get to you.

Sales call on my landline? No. Not really. With caller ID I don't answer if I don't know who it is. Once again, technology can help.

I also enjoy the paycheck I get too as well as the job satisfaction of knowing if I do my job well thousands of others are able to do theirs well also.

As for "interpersonal relationships" or lack thereof and blaming technology? Please. Nothing prevents anyone from talking to people. If people don't talk the blame doesn't lie with technology, but with the people. Blaming a tool for a personal problem is just being lazy.

The reality for me is that I stay in contact far more with my friends and relatives despite, at times, living a considerable distance from them.

Last night I was able to video conference with my two grown children going to school on opposite ends of the country (both are in college). Something not possible just a few short years ago. I was able to help my son with a rather difficult homework assignment live. I was able to review a term paper my daughter wrote by her emailing it to me.

Using my Slingbox my family, despite being 1500 miles apart across this country is still able to enjoy our weekly TV night watching our favorite show together while video conferencing.

Technology has enabled me to be a part of children's lives as they grow into adults.

My aged mother can reach out and call me anytime she needs to.

Technology allowed me to say goodbye to my father when my flight was delayed and I wasn't going to be able to reach him before he passed on.

I keep in touch with my best friend from high school. I routinely keep in touch with several friends and family I have back in Africa.

No, I wouldn't trade technology and the ability it's given me to stay in touch with friends and families--except for maybe something even more advanced.

If people don't communicate with each other it's because THEY have a problem--not technology.

Cajun76
12-13-2007, 02:55 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/captsgepxz06040304141957photo00.jpg

Nuff said.

joeap
12-13-2007, 06:06 AM
Originally posted by WWSensei:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Aimail101:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WWSensei:
"The Good Old Days" were seldom as good as people remember them.


My only complaint is I wish I was already into the next decade so I can see what else is new.

So you like the idea of bosses being able to get hold of you 24/7 on your mobile, or the constant barrage of deadlines sent by e-mail. Or the countless sales calls on your landline? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>



If people don't communicate with each other it's because THEY have a problem--not technology. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well said sensei. What's the matter with you Aimail? You seem to be stubbornly ignoring the positive things technology has brought while focusing on the negatives, real though they are. As one poster said, he owes his life to technology. Frankly this is borderline hypocrisy on your part and many others here...let me repeat, if you really feel so strongly shut off your computer and never turn it on again.

HeinzBar
12-13-2007, 10:11 AM
S!,
I think this sums it up perfectly.What a difference a sad event in someone's life makes.

GEORGE CARLIN (His wife recently died...)

Isn't it amazing that George Carlin - comedian of the 70's and 80's - could
write something so very eloquent...and so very appropriate.

A Message by George Carlin:

The paradox of our time in history is that we have taller buildings but shorter tempers, wider Freeways, but narrower viewpoints. We spend more, but have less, we buy more, but enjoy less. We have bigger houses and smaller families, more conveniences, but less time. We have more degrees but less sense, more knowledge, but less judgment, more experts, yet more problems, more medicine, but less wellne ss.

We drink too much, smoke too much, spend too recklessly, laugh too little, drive too fast, get too angry, stay up too late, get up too tired, read too little, watch TV too much, and pray too seldom.

We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. We talk too much, love too seldom, and hate too often.

We've learned how to make a living, but not a life. We've added years to life not life to years. We've been all the way to the moon and back, but have trouble crossing the street to meet a new neighbor. We conquered outer space but not inner space. We've done larger things, but not better things.

We've cleaned up the air, but polluted the soul. We've conquered the atom, but
not our prejudice. We write more, but learn less. We plan more, but accomplish less. We've learned to rush, but not to wait. We build more computers to hold more information, to produce more copies than ever, but we communicate less and less.

These are the times of fast foods and slow digestion, big men and small character, steep profits and shallow relationships. These are the days of two incomes but more divorce, fancier houses, but broken homes. These are days of quick trips, disposable diapers, throwaway morality, one night stands, overweight bodies, and pills that do everything from cheer, to quiet, to kill. It is a time when there is much in the showroom window and nothing in the stockroom. A time when technology can bring this letter to you, and a time when you can choose either to share this insight, or to just hit delete...

Remember; spend some time with your loved ones, because they are not going to be around forever.

Remember, say a kind word to someone who looks up to you in awe, because that little person soon will grow up and leave your side.

Remember, to give a warm hug to the one next to you, because that is the only
treasure you can give with your heart and it doesn't cost a cent.

Remember, to say, "I love you" to your partner and your loved ones, but most of all mean it. A kiss and an embrace will mend hurt when it comes from deep inside of you.

Remember to hold hands and cherish the moment for someday that person will not
be there again.

Give time to love, give time to speak! And give time to share the precious thoughts in your mind.

AND ALWAYS REMEMBER:

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away.

George Carlin

LEBillfish
12-13-2007, 10:15 AM
Good stuff HeinzBar

Airmail109
12-13-2007, 06:55 PM
Originally posted by joeap:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WWSensei:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Aimail101:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WWSensei:
"The Good Old Days" were seldom as good as people remember them.


My only complaint is I wish I was already into the next decade so I can see what else is new.

So you like the idea of bosses being able to get hold of you 24/7 on your mobile, or the constant barrage of deadlines sent by e-mail. Or the countless sales calls on your landline? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>



If people don't communicate with each other it's because THEY have a problem--not technology. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well said sensei. What's the matter with you Aimail? You seem to be stubbornly ignoring the positive things technology has brought while focusing on the negatives, real though they are. As one poster said, he owes his life to technology. Frankly this is borderline hypocrisy on your part and many others here...let me repeat, if you really feel so strongly shut off your computer and never turn it on again. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

For sure Medicine, Sustainable Energy and Agriculture technology is great. But the rest are either novelties or a pain in the arse.

Even though Science is unpredictable, give this a thought.

"But in the nearer future, humans will evolve in 1,000 years into giants between 6ft and 7ft tall, he predicts, while life-spans will have extended to 120 years, Dr Curry claims.

Physical appearance, driven by indicators of health, youth and fertility, will improve, he says, while men will exhibit symmetrical facial features, look athletic, and have squarer jaws, deeper voices and bigger *****es.

Women, on the other hand, will develop lighter, smooth, hairless skin, large clear eyes, pert breasts, glossy hair, and even features, he adds. Racial differences will be ironed out by interbreeding, producing a uniform race of coffee-coloured people.

However, Dr Curry warns, in 10,000 years time humans may have paid a genetic price for relying on technology.

Spoiled by gadgets designed to meet their every need, they could come to resemble domesticated animals.

Receding chins

Social skills, such as communicating and interacting with others, could be lost, along with emotions such as love, sympathy, trust and respect. People would become less able to care for others, or perform in teams.

Physically, they would start to appear more juvenile. Chins would recede, as a result of having to chew less on processed food.

There could also be health problems caused by reliance on medicine, resulting in weak immune systems. Preventing deaths would also help to preserve the genetic defects that cause cancer.

Further into the future, sexual selection - being choosy about one's partner - was likely to create more and more genetic inequality, said Dr Curry.

The logical outcome would be two sub-species, "gracile" and "robust" humans similar to the Eloi and Morlocks foretold by HG Wells in his 1895 novel The Time Machine.

"While science and technology have the potential to create an ideal habitat for humanity over the next millennium, there is a possibility of a monumental genetic hangover over the subsequent millennia due to an over-reliance on technology reducing our natural capacity to resist disease, or our evolved ability to get along with each other, said Dr Curry."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/6057734.stm

In my opinion theres a limit to how far humanity should go in terms of creating personall technology to make lives easier for humanity. Or does humanity like being lazy and obese. Humans are physical active beings, with emotions. Technology is eroding both of these human expierences.

Yeah, I might just turn my pc off. Ya know, its the only way ALL my friends communicate. I'll just become a solitary bum. Good idea. No discussing this sort of thing does not make me a hypocrite, learn the meaning.

"Hypocrisy is the act of condemning another person for an act of which the critic is guilty."

I have not CONDEMNED anyone for USING technoloy. I condemned aspects of technology itself.

WWSensei
12-13-2007, 07:31 PM
The difference is I've presented concrete examples disproving your thesis. You've done nothing but present strawmen and then proceed to knock them down.

For example, the statement is your post that "Humans are physical active beings, with emotions. Technology is eroding both of these human expierences." is stated as some sort of given fact.

I maintain that it is a 100% false and wrong statement. Technology has nothing to do with someone's physical and emotional well being. That is the responsibility of the person. If anything, technology can actually enhance the ability to be physical and emotionally connect with people.

Fat, lazy people who don't connect with others is not a product of modern technology. They have always existed and always will.

I reject your entire premise.

Airmail109
12-13-2007, 07:38 PM
Originally posted by WWSensei:
The difference is I've presented concrete examples disproving your thesis. You've done nothing but present strawmen and then proceed to knock them down.

For example, the statement is your post that "Humans are physical active beings, with emotions. Technology is eroding both of these human expierences." is stated as some sort of given fact.

I maintain that it is a 100% false and wrong statement. Technology has nothing to do with someone's physical and emotional well being. That is the responsibility of the person. Technology has nothing to do with someone's physical and emotional well being. That is the responsibility of the person. If anything, technology can actually enhance the ability to be physical and emotionally connect with people.


Fat, lazy people who don't connect with others is not a product of modern technology. They have always existed and always will.

I reject your entire premise.

I reject your entire premise

"Technology has nothing to do with someone's physical and emotional well being. That is the responsibility of the person. If anything, technology can actually enhance the ability to be physical and emotionally connect with people." is stated as some sort of given fact.

Technology has everything to do with someones emtional and physical well being. If societies creating a culture whereby work becomes less physical because of technology and the most accepted forms of communication are the least personal then of course physical and emotional problems are going to occur.

Fat lazy people not so long ago would have just been dead.

Did you know that orthodontists are saying there are increasing problems with underdeveloped jaws because people are eating easy to eat processed foods. Now THE difference is I'VE presented concrete examples disproving your thesis.

BerkshireHunt
12-13-2007, 07:43 PM
Originally posted by Aimail101:

The logical outcome would be two sub-species, "gracile" and "robust" humans similar to the Eloi and Morlocks foretold by HG Wells in his 1895 novel The Time Machine.


Yeah, but after a few drinks most guys can't tell the difference

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y183/Minusmonas/morlock.jpg

Airmail109
12-13-2007, 07:54 PM
Originally posted by WWSensei:
If anything, technology can actually enhance the ability to be physical and emotionally connect with people.

On top of the others in the previous post I also reject this claim.

Did you really need a study to tell you that more than 40 percent of what you say in an e-mail is misunderstood? Well, they did one anyway.

http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0515/p13s01-stct.html

How many of your friends have you only spoken with online? If 40 percent of your personality has gotten lost in the text transition, do these people even really know you? The people who dislike you via text, on message boards or chatrooms or whatever, is it because you're really incompatible? Or, is it because of the misunderstood 40 percent? And, what about the ones who like you?

Many of us try to make up that difference in sheer numbers, piling up six dozen friends on MySpace. But here's the problem ...

When someone speaks to you face-to-face, what percentage of the meaning is actually in the words, as opposed to the body language and tone of voice? Take a guess.

It's 7 percent. The other 93 percent is nonverbal, according to studies. No, I don't know how they arrived at that exact number. They have a machine or something. But we didn't need it. I mean, come on. Most of our humor is sarcasm, and sarcasm is just mismatching the words with the tone.

You don't wait for a girl to verbally tell you she likes you. It's the sparkle in her eyes, her posture, the way she grabs your head and shoves your face into her boobs.

That's the crux of the problem. That human ability to absorb the moods of others through that kind of subconscious osmosis is crucial. Kids born without it are considered mentally handicapped. People who have lots of it are called "charismatic" and become movie stars and politicians. It's not what they say; it's this energy they put off that makes us feel good about ourselves.

When we're living in Text World, all that is stripped away. There's a weird side effect to it, too: absent a sense of the other person's mood, every line we read gets filtered through our own mood instead. I read my friend's text message as sarcastic was because I was in an irritable mood. In that state of mind, I was eager to be offended.

RegRag1977
12-13-2007, 08:19 PM
Originally posted by HeinzBar:
S!,
I think this sums it up perfectly.What a difference a sad event in someone's life makes.

GEORGE CARLIN (His wife recently died...)

Isn't it amazing that George Carlin - comedian of the 70's and 80's - could
write something so very eloquent...and so very appropriate.

A Message by George Carlin:

The paradox of our time in history is that we have taller buildings but shorter tempers, wider Freeways, but narrower viewpoints. We spend more, but have less, we buy more, but enjoy less. We have bigger houses and smaller families, more conveniences, but less time. We have more degrees but less sense, more knowledge, but less judgment, more experts, yet more problems, more medicine, but less wellne ss.

We drink too much, smoke too much, spend too recklessly, laugh too little, drive too fast, get too angry, stay up too late, get up too tired, read too little, watch TV too much, and pray too seldom.

We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. We talk too much, love too seldom, and hate too often.

We've learned how to make a living, but not a life. We've added years to life not life to years. We've been all the way to the moon and back, but have trouble crossing the street to meet a new neighbor. We conquered outer space but not inner space. We've done larger things, but not better things.

We've cleaned up the air, but polluted the soul. We've conquered the atom, but
not our prejudice. We write more, but learn less. We plan more, but accomplish less. We've learned to rush, but not to wait. We build more computers to hold more information, to produce more copies than ever, but we communicate less and less.

These are the times of fast foods and slow digestion, big men and small character, steep profits and shallow relationships. These are the days of two incomes but more divorce, fancier houses, but broken homes. These are days of quick trips, disposable diapers, throwaway morality, one night stands, overweight bodies, and pills that do everything from cheer, to quiet, to kill. It is a time when there is much in the showroom window and nothing in the stockroom. A time when technology can bring this letter to you, and a time when you can choose either to share this insight, or to just hit delete...

Remember; spend some time with your loved ones, because they are not going to be around forever.

Remember, say a kind word to someone who looks up to you in awe, because that little person soon will grow up and leave your side.

Remember, to give a warm hug to the one next to you, because that is the only
treasure you can give with your heart and it doesn't cost a cent.

Remember, to say, "I love you" to your partner and your loved ones, but most of all mean it. A kiss and an embrace will mend hurt when it comes from deep inside of you.

Remember to hold hands and cherish the moment for someday that person will not
be there again.

Give time to love, give time to speak! And give time to share the precious thoughts in your mind.

AND ALWAYS REMEMBER:

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away.

George Carlin

Nice read.

carguy_
12-13-2007, 08:23 PM
THE SKY IS FALLING!!! man strikes again.

Aren`t you bored with all those global warming threads posted before? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif

RegRag1977
12-13-2007, 08:45 PM
In fact i think that Aimail started a really interesting discussion. I personnaly tend to agree with some of his ideas.

Don't stop

MEGILE
12-14-2007, 03:15 AM
I love how Americans say Meth-ane and brits says Mee-thane.

Just saying..

RegRag1977
12-14-2007, 03:44 AM
Fat, lazy people who don't connect with others is not a product of modern technology. They have always existed and always will.

Hasn't it something to do with "industrial" food and "modern" way of life?

I wonder why such people are mostly living in highly developped countries like the USA...But maybe it's just a coincidence?

carguy_
12-14-2007, 03:52 AM
Originally posted by RegRag1977:
In fact i think that Aimail started a really interesting discussion.

Yeah sure I don`t disagree that others are making a pretty good thread about it.But lookie here, the guy pops in and tries to talk everybody into a vision that world sux, humans are bound to destroy themselves and everything good is a has-been. Yeah, my cell phone is evil cuz it radiates me, my PC only makes me lose time, cars that have airconditioning are awful blah blah blah blah

Maybe he needs help.Seriously.

Airmail109
12-14-2007, 03:56 AM
Originally posted by carguy_:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by RegRag1977:
In fact i think that Aimail started a really interesting discussion.

Yeah sure I don`t disagree that others are making a pretty good thread about it.But lookie here, the guy pops in and tries to talk everybody into a vision that world sux, humans are bound to destroy themselves and everything good is a has-been. Yeah, my cell phone is evil cuz it radiates me, my PC only makes me lose time, cars that have airconditioning are awful blah blah blah blah

Maybe he needs help.Seriously. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Nahhh the world doesnt really suck. Conversely I'ts actually great for me, I wanted a broader discussion on the way humanities moving forward not a "the world sucks" rant thread. Maybe I should have worded it differently, will change the heading. Even though I dont agree with Sensies point of view I still find his interesting. Same as anyones on here.

Again lots of stuff gets lost in translation on the internet.

carguy_
12-14-2007, 03:58 AM
Originally posted by RegRag1977:
I wonder why such people are mostly living in highly developped countries like the USA...But maybe it's just a coincidence?

I`d think that it`s a lil bit of the mentality.Compared to other countries a normal US citizen has a "lazy life". Don`t get me wrong, food is dirt cheap there, easily accesable and it doesn`t take much for a person to have money to live. I`m interested if your TV promotes sports or not.

One thing is for sure - the US also has a lot and I mean a lot of perfectly fit people. Elite at every olympic event, lots of people have cardio training and weight lifting written into their lives. A good indication of its wealthiness.

RegRag1977
12-14-2007, 07:13 AM
Originally posted by carguy_:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by RegRag1977:
In fact i think that Aimail started a really
interesting discussion.

Yeah sure I don`t disagree that others are making a pretty good thread about it.But lookie here, the guy pops in and tries to talk everybody into a vision that world sux, humans are bound to destroy themselves and everything good is a has-been. Yeah, my cell phone is evil cuz it radiates me, my PC only makes me lose time, cars that have airconditioning are awful blah blah blah blah

Maybe he needs help.Seriously. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


I don't know about Aimail, i'm not a native speaker, but as far as i understood his words, he gives me the impression of an educated guy that feels concerned about the world he's living in. Sure he must have some education, time to read and to think. In fact life surely don't suck for him.
Sometimes i think he's overexagerating but i share his general point of view about the issues with technology.

Can't a man benefit from something and do critics about it? Or shall we lie about it to sleep better at night?

To me Aimail is not trying to say that "the world sucks, why do you like it stupids?". If i understood the man, he's disappointed by the uses of technology, knowing it's potential. After all there something like a promise behind technology, a promise for better life for mankind. The question is what do we do with it. Taking in account the huge potential that technology gives to mankind, do you think that we can live only to be satisfied by the world we are living in? My opinion is that there's a great waste of potential in the ( destructive) uses of technology (for greed), and that we have no great reasons to find our societies "that" good (in a moral point of view).
We must have courage, it's our duty to try to make things better. What i agree with you is that we must not kill the morale but keep it high. A way to do it is sometimes to share ideas, to speak about what's wrong in our societies, sometimes this hurts. But this discussion is not to discourage people.

Some say that Aimail only sees that what is bad,but to me it's because he's disapointed by the waste of potential.
I don't think that he needs help. What i like is that he doesn't try to cheat himself, he knows he's benefiting from the technology like you and me, but in the same time he knows that there's something wrong that could very bad for the human community.
Most people prefer not to ask themselves about the problems: that's only to try not to suffer from the fact that they maybe are benefiting from something that can cause bad effects on people.
If we want to change things and make them better, we have to take conscience of what's wrong. This world is far from being finished or dead, thank God, many forces are still present, we have to like it, to live our lives with courage, but we have also to accept and know it for what it is really, if we want to make it improve.

Saying that i too uses a computer and therefore am a hypocrit, doesn't change the problem.

(Yeah my english is poor, but that's the best i can do)

joeap
12-15-2007, 03:43 AM
Originally posted by Aimail101:


You don't wait for a girl to verbally tell you she likes you. It's the sparkle in her eyes, her posture, the way she grabs your head and shoves your face into her boobs.
...

When we're living in Text World, all that is stripped away. There's a weird side effect to it, too: absent a sense of the other person's mood, every line we read gets filtered through our own mood instead. I read my friend's text message as sarcastic was because I was in an irritable mood. In that state of mind, I was eager to be offended.

Yes I had to bold that. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Well, I took some time answering, cause Wednesday night I had my weekly pub meeting with buddies (every Wednesday), Thursday I had a dance class (ballroom dancing), Friday was off so had an appointment with my gym trainer (got a membership 2 months ago) to work on a new programme for toning and cardio.

I also am on Facebook, but every person, and I mean every person on it (50 atm) is someone I met in real life, friends, classmates, colleagues. A neighbour, a kid next door who I use to play with some decades ago (ok 3 urg) found me. He's just turned 40 and has 4 kids and works at a University in Vancouver. I've found friends I did my Masters with, my BA, and even found high school friends. The ones I met in Geneva, some of who have moved away, I can keep in touch with. I can't really make new friends with, I mean I have met people I think I'd be friends with here...but would have to meet them in real life to be certain. Next time I'm in the UK for example.

I guess what I'm saying is that you did a good thing bringing this stuff up, it just seems every new thing or idea (by idea I mean political philosophy or religion) we come up with has a positive and negative side...we just have to try to keep the positive side up.

Messaschnitzel
12-15-2007, 01:21 PM
I think that a good analogy to the technological/social/philosophical phenomena are the commercials that tout new medicines that profess to cure or ease an affliction, only to find out later in the message that the side effects sometimes outweigh the benefits.

For example, I remember when people were respectful of others at the movie theater. If people had to speak, they did so by whispering momentarily. Since the advent of the VCR and DVD player, people have become inconsiderate of others by making comments and having open conversations during the movie. If they are asked to be quiet, they will act as if their privacy has been intruded upon by a complete stranger who has no business whatsoever speaking to them.

I credit this behavior to the convienience of having these devices in the home, where one can comment on how they liked the original version better than the one that is now being viewed, ad nauseum.

Having spoken with people on this particular issue, I find that the prime factor in going to a public movie theater is to view the movie on the big screen, as it was intended to be seen.

When asked about the people who talk during a movie a lot of them will not say anything about this misbehavior, and put up with it due to not wanting to attract attention of the talkers.

I am the kind of person that will politely ask people to please be quiet during the movie. The result is that the people doing the talking will give me the evil eye glare and make some sort of verbal retort, sometimes along with a threat to do physical damage. That's fine by me as long as they stop talking and follow up with what they said, preferably after the movie.

After having to deal with this annoying problem with practically every movie that I would go to see, I could not see the logic in taking the time driving to the theater, paying $10.00 per person along with money for refreshments, only to have some inconsiderate morons screw up what would be an ordinarily pleasant and uneventful experience.

Now, with DVDs regularly being sold shortly after a movie's run, I will gladly wait and rent them. If it is a movie that I would like to see again, I will purchase it. Now, I can put the movie on pause and go take a leak without missing anything.

I think that with any invention or development, the benefits sometimes have unintended results that are not necessarily beneficial. For example, international air travel and jet lag like to accompany each other for some strange reason. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

P.S. Oh yeah, I forgot to mention cell phones and pagers during the movie. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Messaschnitzel
12-15-2007, 01:39 PM
Originally posted by M4Sherman4:
The souther United States.We have our own dialect http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif .

I know what you mean. I am from East Texas.

Airmail109
12-15-2007, 07:24 PM
Originally posted by joeap:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Aimail101:


You don't wait for a girl to verbally tell you she likes you. It's the sparkle in her eyes, her posture, the way she grabs your head and shoves your face into her boobs.
...

When we're living in Text World, all that is stripped away. There's a weird side effect to it, too: absent a sense of the other person's mood, every line we read gets filtered through our own mood instead. I read my friend's text message as sarcastic was because I was in an irritable mood. In that state of mind, I was eager to be offended.

Yes I had to bold that. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Well, I took some time answering, cause Wednesday night I had my weekly pub meeting with buddies (every Wednesday), Thursday I had a dance class (ballroom dancing), Friday was off so had an appointment with my gym trainer (got a membership 2 months ago) to work on a new programme for toning and cardio.

I also am on Facebook, but every person, and I mean every person on it (50 atm) is someone I met in real life, friends, classmates, colleagues. A neighbour, a kid next door who I use to play with some decades ago (ok 3 urg) found me. He's just turned 40 and has 4 kids and works at a University in Vancouver. I've found friends I did my Masters with, my BA, and even found high school friends. The ones I met in Geneva, some of who have moved away, I can keep in touch with. I can't really make new friends with, I mean I have met people I think I'd be friends with here...but would have to meet them in real life to be certain. Next time I'm in the UK for example.

I guess what I'm saying is that you did a good thing bringing this stuff up, it just seems every new thing or idea (by idea I mean political philosophy or religion) we come up with has a positive and negative side...we just have to try to keep the positive side up. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Nice read, Yeah good points. Heheheh I still havn't been bothered to work out how to bold stuff on here, even though Ive posted here for years.

slipBall
12-16-2007, 03:21 AM
It will be a very strange world, when you bring home your new cybor wife to meet your parents

David Levy, a British artificial intelligence researcher and international chess master, defended yesterday his Ph.D. thesis at the University of Maastricht in the Netherlands. The name of his thesis is "Intimate Relationships with Artificial Partners" and the University announced it under the name "Love and Sex with Robots." Levy says that trends in robotics and artificial intelligence will, ˜within a few decades, result in robots that are so humanlike in their appearance and functionality, in their personality, and in their expression of emotions, that many people will be falling in love with them, having sex with them, and even marrying them

RegRag1977
12-16-2007, 06:45 AM
Falling in love with bots?

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g308/RegRag1977/rachel.jpg

raaaid
12-16-2007, 09:25 AM
i think naature will always be ahead tech