PDA

View Full Version : Controls



vinny20051975
07-15-2006, 05:48 PM
Hi i have been flying around in everyplane but why do i keep turning slowly to the left. I have to keep holding my joystick at an angle to correct.

Thanks

vinny20051975
07-15-2006, 05:48 PM
Hi i have been flying around in everyplane but why do i keep turning slowly to the left. I have to keep holding my joystick at an angle to correct.

Thanks

Hashmark13
07-15-2006, 06:06 PM
I'll try to make this simple. If the prop is rotating left, there is a column of air surrounding the fuselage rotating around the aircraft in the same direction as the prop. When that column runs into things such as wings and rudders, it's going to push on them, and the aircraft will roll to the left.

If the plane has aileron trim, trim it.

vinny20051975
07-15-2006, 06:50 PM
Well i have tryed assigning keys to trim and also prop pitch but im still turning. Could it be my microsoft sidewinder joystick?
When you adjust trim does it come up on the screen?

Thanks

Dew-Claw
07-15-2006, 08:52 PM
Out on a limb here but is it a multi engine aircraft like a p38?
you need to select all engines before powering up or you'll do circles

FritzGryphon
07-15-2006, 09:44 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Well i have tryed assigning keys to trim and also prop pitch but im still turning. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Prop pitch will not affect the plane's tendancy to roll.

Make sure the airplane you are flying actually has aileron or rudder trim. Most planes do not have airleron trim. Some planes do not have rudder trim either (Bf-109).

Long story short, get used to manually centering your plane. 99% of the time no amount of trim will make you go straight.

Only when you are flying perfectly level, at a perfectly constant airspeed for long periods of time should you bother trimming.

Dew-Claw
07-15-2006, 10:07 PM
Also, in planes with a real hard pull, sometimes a light tap on the brakes will help keep you straight.
Light....I mean real quick press and release.

Crash_Moses
07-15-2006, 10:10 PM
Engine torque is also a factor in this and trim is the solution.

Use right rudder trim to center the ball in your turn/slip indicator. If you still pull to the left apply a few more clicks of right rudder or one or two clicks of right aileron trim. At high RPMs the engine will create a lot more torque so try reducing your prop pitch while cruising (I like to use 80% prop pitch). This saves fuel and allows the engine to run cooler. Return to 100% prop pitch during combat. By letting the engine run cooler on the way to the target you won't have to worry about the engine heating up as fast during combat.

If the airplane you're flying doesn't have trim you'll have to use your rudder pedals and joystick to keep everything centered.

I use trim constantly. A properly trimmed aircraft will fly faster (keep that ball centered!) and is easier to aim (IMHO). Most WWII era planes didn't have motors or hydraulic assists to help the pilot move the control surfaces. It takes considerably more effort to move the control surfaces in high speed flight as opposed to sitting on the ground. Most pilots returned from long combat missions utterly exhausted from the ordeal. As such they were constantly adjusting trim to make it easier to fly the plane and conserve their strength for when they needed it.

Trim is your friend! S!