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SirPapps
04-30-2007, 02:58 PM
Back ... again!

research shows that the F4U has a Hamilton Standard Hydrodynamic propellor. Such a device apparently maintains a given RPM when set to that.

Flying the F4U has really been a joy and i've constantly set my prop pitch to about 85-90. The cowl flaps have been left open at about 2 except during hard dives and quick runs at which point theyre set as closed. I've trimmed my plane so that the turn and slip indicator are centered, as is the balance gyro. Wondering why i feel sooo very slow. I could just barely keep up with Me 323's! I know that the AI always has themselves perfectly trimmed, but they're THREE TWO THREES. what exactly am i doing wrong here, and what are the best settings for gaining the best speed while not heating up too quickly in the F4U's climb, level and diving flight?

thanks! <S>

Crash_Moses
04-30-2007, 03:55 PM
Not sure.

You should ask over in the Pacific Fighters forum...more F4U pilots hang out over there.

S!

Fireball_
04-30-2007, 03:58 PM
I'm definitely NOT an expert on this. In fact here's a post I did just last night asking the same general type of question you're asking. I got some helpful responses:

http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/23110283/m/1701032555

But I would think you'd get max airspeed in level flight or a climb, at 100% prop pitch and full throttle. I think you could leave the prop at 100% indefinitely without overheating, it's the throttle (which controls manifold pressure) that you'd have to back off a little bit. You can't run at 110% throttle (WEP) for very long. I'm not sure if you can run at 99% or 100% throttle (non-WEP) indefinitely, but I think you'd last for several minutes at least. For continuous max operation without overheating you might have to back down to 95-97% throttle.

As for the cowl flaps, I'm not sure how much effect they have in-game.

I could be way off base here. I'll be interested to hear what other people say.

DmdSeeker
04-30-2007, 04:03 PM
Super chargers? Mixture?

VW-IceFire
04-30-2007, 04:26 PM
Mixture should be at 100% and use the 120% only for takeoff with a heavy load. At 100% you're basically in an automatic mode. Prop pitch should be at 100% and not 90% or 80% as at 100% you'll be getting the most power. That will account partially for your lack of top speed.

You should also be using the correct supercharger stage setting (the Corsair has a manual supercharger system) otherwise you'll be going allot slower.

crucislancer
04-30-2007, 04:37 PM
I've just recently started flying the Corsair with complex engine management, so my experience is limited as well, but here are some points:

Prop Pitch - Setting it to a lower % is preferable when cruising. P11.cAce explained it to me in another thread, that prop pitch is like manual transmission in a car. 100% PP is like first gear, so you want to gradialy bring the pitch down as you gain airspeed. You have to adjust throttle as well. Leaving the PP at 100% all the time will fry your engine eventually, working it too hard without much gain. The Corsair is a lot more forgiving with PP as opposed to a bf109, which will fry your engine in less then a minute if you go 110% throttle and 100% PP.

Superchargers - I think you shift to the second SC at 8000 ft, the 3rd at 23000, but I could be wrong. That's pretty important. Not having the right settings will cause loss of speed.

fuel mixture - Only use 120% for takeoff and landing, 100% for everything else.

I played a mission this morning in a F4U-D, once I got up to the altitude I wanted, I started backing off on PP and set my throttle to 85%. I had PP at 65% or so, and I was gaining speed, and booking along quite nicely. Trim, as mentioned before, also helps.

XyZspineZyX
04-30-2007, 04:51 PM
Originally posted by crucislancer:
as opposed to a bf109, which will fry your engine in less then a minute if you go 110% throttle and 100% PP.



Thats because the 109 does not use a constant speed propeller, but a fully automatic one. NEVER take the automation off the prop pitch in a 109, unless you know what you are doing.

crucislancer
04-30-2007, 04:59 PM
Originally posted by Skunk241981:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by crucislancer:
as opposed to a bf109, which will fry your engine in less then a minute if you go 110% throttle and 100% PP.



Thats because the 109 does not use a constant speed propeller, but a fully automatic one. NEVER take the automation off the prop pitch in a 109, unless you know what you are doing. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ah, I see. Yeah, I learned my lesson with the 109 the first time I did it. Never even got off the runway. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif

VW-IceFire
04-30-2007, 05:25 PM
Originally posted by crucislancer:
I played a mission this morning in a F4U-D, once I got up to the altitude I wanted, I started backing off on PP and set my throttle to 85%. I had PP at 65% or so, and I was gaining speed, and booking along quite nicely. Trim, as mentioned before, also helps.
True...just be sure to ramp it back up to 100% "prop pitch" (you aren't really controlling the pitch after all) when in combat.

crucislancer
04-30-2007, 05:34 PM
Originally posted by VW-IceFire:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by crucislancer:
I played a mission this morning in a F4U-D, once I got up to the altitude I wanted, I started backing off on PP and set my throttle to 85%. I had PP at 65% or so, and I was gaining speed, and booking along quite nicely. Trim, as mentioned before, also helps.
True...just be sure to ramp it back up to 100% "prop pitch" (you aren't really controlling the pitch after all) when in combat. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Right. I was cruising at that point. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

SirPapps
04-30-2007, 06:20 PM
Thanks once again all <S>

So all this time i was hindering maximum combat performance... no wonder. I have been told to drop the pitch down when in a power dive in order to go faster, however.

guess i'll just open up those cowl flaps when im really overheating, then huh?

BuzzU
04-30-2007, 06:32 PM
Originally posted by SirPapps:
Thanks once again all <S>

So all this time i was hindering maximum combat performance... no wonder. I have been told to drop the pitch down when in a power dive in order to go faster, however.

guess i'll just open up those cowl flaps when im really overheating, then huh?

Open them before you overheat.

Nimits
04-30-2007, 06:34 PM
So all this time i was hindering maximum combat performance... no wonder. I have been told to drop the pitch down when in a power dive in order to go faster, however.


Well, you'd be decreasing the "bite" of the props; it's been a while since I could recite all the different forces involved in variable pitch prop planes off the top of my head, but I guess you would be reducing drag from the props. At the same time, the blades are not going to be pushing forward/downard as much either.

IRL, alot of US pilots just set prop pitch to max when entering combat and left it there for the duration.

VW-IceFire
04-30-2007, 08:09 PM
Unless someone has shown 4.08 to be different the cowl flaps on all R-2800 engined aircraft don't work. So you might as well keep the flaps down and just back off on the throttle. Corsairs and Hellcats overheat above 100% rather quickly but at 99% you can run for a very long time.

Grey_Mouser67
04-30-2007, 09:48 PM
Don't open up the cowl flaps because they don't cool the engine but they do slow the aircraft down...same goes for the Hellcat and Wildcat. I'm suprised more folks don't know this.

Also it is a good idea to time the amount of time the engine can run in overheat...radial engines go longer and I can't remember off hand what the corsair was but I think it pushes 10 minutes....in game, overheat doesn't work the way you think. If the engine overheats for a set period of time the engine fries...it doesn't matter what your throttle setting is so if you are overheated, cut your throttle as much as you can until you get the "normal" sign and you are good for another 10 minutes.

Of course, lower pitch settings means lower rpms so you will run a cooler engine. In terms of diving, I've read much about it, but I am unable to hold a constant dive angle so I don't know if prop pitch really helps.

Shift supercharger at about 8,000 and 18,000 ft if memory serves me and try to run your aircraft fast. It gets real unstable and the nose oscillates at lower speeds and harsh stick inputs. You can shed your wings in a high speed dive and pullout below 5000 ft, but it is hard to do and I rarely have an issue with it.

If you fly cockpit on, map a key to cockpit open. I leave mine open most of the time except when I need speed. The armor rim really kills visability with no 6 dof and with the hatch open, it has reasonable rearward visability. Corsair is really good against everything but the Frank. Not sure about the Jack and George as I don't see them much.

OMK_Hand
05-01-2007, 02:15 AM
The cowl flaps do make a difference on these types when cooling a hot engine, to the tune of ten degrees or so.
It's not hard to test, try it.

Wedge598
05-01-2007, 06:29 AM
This is a interesting thread. I've been fooling around with the Corsair a bit myself. I really enjoyed the ones I have for FS2004 and was hoping to fly some in battle with this game.

Initially I was disappointed with the flight characteristics because I was easily stalling the airplane when I rolled over to anywhere near a 90 degree bank angle. No matter what my speed.

I finally figured out my problem last night. When trying to turn a very tight high G turn I was using rudder to combat the dendency for the nose to pitch up when I pulled back on the stick. What a doof. Using the rudder was causing the plane to stall. Once I took my feet away from the rudders I found I was able to do all kinds of manuevers without stalling the aircraft at all. And soon I was taking down those Zeros with relative ease.

I'm learning quickly that all me years of civilian flight simming didn't help me understand the flight mechanics of dogfighting as much as I thought. But it sure is fun when you finally get that bead on your enemy and you did it with some great flying.

I'm using complex engine management as I'm comfortable with setting superchargers and prop pitchs from my civilian trianing but I've never tried to manage fuel mixture before. What is the rule of thumb for setting that during battle. So far I've left it at 100% and haven't seen any ill-effects yet.

JG53Frankyboy
05-01-2007, 06:34 AM
Originally posted by Wedge598:
This is a interesting thread. I've been fooling around with the Corsair a bit myself. I really enjoyed the ones I have for FS2004 and was hoping to fly some in battle with this game.

Initially I was disappointed with the flight characteristics because I was easily stalling the airplane when I rolled over to anywhere near a 90 degree bank angle. No matter what my speed.

I finally figured out my problem last night. When trying to turn a very tight high G turn I was using rudder to combat the dendency for the nose to pitch up when I pulled back on the stick. What a doof. Using the rudder was causing the plane to stall. Once I took my feet away from the rudders I found I was able to do all kinds of manuevers without stalling the aircraft at all. And soon I was taking down those Zeros with relative ease.

I'm learning quickly that all me years of civilian flight simming didn't help me understand the flight mechanics of dogfighting as much as I thought. But it sure is fun when you finally get that bead on your enemy and you did it with some great flying.

I'm using complex engine management as I'm comfortable with setting superchargers and prop pitchs from my civilian trianing but I've never tried to manage fuel mixture before. What is the rule of thumb for setting that during battle. So far I've left it at 100% and haven't seen any ill-effects yet.

in the Corsair you can forgett the mixture setting.......... it has only 120% (not needed) and 100% .
in other planes the mixture is full manual - if you fly to mixture rich you will have a black smoketrail comming out of your engine and you will loose power.
most important in Soviet fighters......... because there you have to reduce the mixture sometimes very low, in comparison to other planes.

the 120% in the F4U can only be used till ~700m IIRC (long time not tested again), than the black smoke appears.....