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XyZspineZyX
08-20-2003, 01:14 AM
I know that Russian tanks in the first years of the war did not have radios. Was this the case with Russian fighters-especially the pre-war models such as the I-16?
Can anyone give me some insight on this?

XyZspineZyX
08-20-2003, 01:14 AM
I know that Russian tanks in the first years of the war did not have radios. Was this the case with Russian fighters-especially the pre-war models such as the I-16?
Can anyone give me some insight on this?

XyZspineZyX
08-20-2003, 01:26 AM
I think it was discussed in the past. Problem is that if they model the planes without radio, then Maddox has to develop some sort of comunication system (for the AI) through wing moves or whatever, as it was done in RL.

<center>http://www.geocities.com/dangdenge2004/arau.txt



|TAO|

XyZspineZyX
08-20-2003, 04:34 AM
But am I right in my assumption that most early war Russian planes did not have radios. When did they start to commonly appear in Russian aircraft? Don't really care in game terms but am interested for my own sake.

XyZspineZyX
08-20-2003, 05:19 AM
CRSutton wrote:
- But am I right in my assumption that most early war
- Russian planes did not have radios. When did they
- start to commonly appear in Russian aircraft? Don't
- really care in game terms but am interested for my
- own sake.
-
-


Ya you are right, it's either no radio or not realiable radio. That's why when they received the 1 batch of hurri, they are very impress on the radio system.



Lt.Davis

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**Speed is the KEY**

XyZspineZyX
08-20-2003, 10:34 AM
Hello,

These are the excerpts from the interview with a former WWII Russian fighter pilot:

"Q. What can you say about the radio equipment (in I-16)?

A. Radios were installed from Type 17 on. I can only say it was of terrible quality! It utilised some cardboard components which, becoming slightly wet, created nothing but loud crackling noise. You couldn't hear anything but that noise, it was really terrible! The headsets were also quite uncomfortable. In practice, we used to communicate using aircraft manoeuvres (rocking wings, etc.) and gestures (head turn, hand and finger movements, etc.). For example, showing two fingers with subsequent movement of the palm to the right meant "Pair break to the right!".

"Q. Was it (Hurricane) equipped with a radio?

A. Our Hurricanes had UHF radios with six channels. Those were reliable, both the receiver and transmitter. The only negative aspect was that the microphone was inside the oxygen mask. The mask itself and the microphone felt heavy and uncomfortable to wear, especially in combat. If you fastened the mask too tight it pinched, and if you had it too loose it would pull away during heavy G manoeuvres. The transmitter was of a simplex-duplex type; that is, it could be activated to send-receive with a push-to-talk switch or by the voice. When we spoke, the transmitter automatically switched on; otherwise it was in receiving mode. We could also select the mode manually, for which we had a special knob in the cockpit. At first we all used the voice-activation capability. Sometimes during the engagement, someone would curse unintentionally and block the frequency preventing others from transmitting or receiving the necessary command. So, later on, we used to keep the switch control of the radio set in the push-to-talk mode. Because of the microphone, we always had to wear the oxygen mask."


You may read the full text at my site:

http://www.russianaviationarchive.com

Cheers,
=38=IndiaOscar


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XyZspineZyX
08-20-2003, 10:42 AM
They were there from the beginning but only on a limited number of fighters (all twin or four engined bombers and transports had radios and most single engined bombers too).

They went progressively on Russian aircrafts (lend-lease ones had almost all a radio) and from late 1942 onwards, most fighters had some reliable R/T equipment.

As for the I-16, I heard that the only ones which had often a radio were the tip 29s, which according to the pilots had a much more modern equipment than before.

XyZspineZyX
08-20-2003, 02:30 PM
Thanks for the info. This goes a long way towards explaining the tactical disadvantages faced by the Russians in the early going. No matter how good the plane or pilots, fighting against planes with working radios must have been a major disadvantage.