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Messervy
12-08-2004, 02:26 AM
For quite some time I`ve been wondering what kind of vessel a sloop is. I know what corvette is and I understand that Frigate is something between destroyer and corvette. I belive the American equivalent is DE (destroyer escort).
Now in my language there is no direct translation for sloop. I think it is slightly larger than corvette, but smaller than frigate.
I would appreciate if someone could explain what differs the sloop from the other two vessels.
http://tinypic.com/v9ys6
I belive this is a sloop

Teddy Bar
12-08-2004, 02:56 AM
Messervy,
A great site to get a lot of information on what, how and when is the Uboat.net (http://uboat.ne)

The uboat.net has an Allies Section (http://uboat.net/allies) where you will find the Allied Escorts (http://uboat.net/allies/ships/escorts.htm)

An Excert from the sloop page...
Like Corvettes, the sloop was a slow escort (16 knots) vessel, small and somewhat lightly armed. The main design element of this type of ship was long voyages so they could outperform the corvette in this regard. They were intended for the Mediterranean and South Pacific service which made them cold and miserable ships in the more hostile North Atlantic. One class, Black Swan, that was designed just before the war, was faster (19 knots) and carried more anti-aircraft armament. Sloops generally carried a large number of depth charges and were very well equipped with sensors making then effective U-boat hunters.

Messervy
12-08-2004, 03:14 AM
Thanks Teddy Bar. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif
All I have to figure out now is how on earth will I invent the word for that. Sloops were there long before WWll and maybe I could draw some conclusion from their origin.

Jose.MaC
12-08-2004, 06:33 AM
I would try to find if ever had been bought a sloop in my Navy. USA and Great Britain have been selling their old ships for decades to countries that couldn't afford to made it for themselves or who didn't had the last tecnology.

Btw, maybe they're just light frigates or something in this way.

Yarrick_
12-08-2004, 10:42 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif pocket fritagtes to avoid spending steel http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Just leave me laugh... a pocket frigate seems much less fearsome than German pocket battleships http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Maybe they had paper armor, just like Zeros... and they had to hurry to avoid it being dissoluted on the water http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif Bismark would come near them and the crew breathe really hard, and they would sink... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

bertgang
12-10-2004, 02:31 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Messervy:
Thanks Teddy Bar. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif
All I have to figure out now is how on earth will I invent the word for that. Sloops were there long before WWll and maybe I could draw some conclusion from their origin. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes, for some strange reason the same name was already used since the age of sail; and some leisure boat are still called sloop.

Dominicrigg
12-10-2004, 02:40 AM
Sloop

A dutch designed warship with only one mast. Used extensively in the colonisation of the carribean (can you tell im playing sid miers pirates at the moment lol)

From the dutch word sloep which means to glide.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Messervy
12-10-2004, 03:02 AM
Gliding Corvette - Frigate than! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

In my language it would be like that:
Jadralna korvetna fregata!

SailorSteve
12-10-2004, 10:27 PM
Well, in the sailing days, at least the British sailing days, it was a bit more complicated.

Of course as Messervy points out the names all come from older names, i.e. Frigate comes from the spanish fregata, and at first was applied to any fast warship.

Warship Hull Designs:
Boat: no decks-any guns are in the hull.
Sloop: one deck-all guns are on that deck.
Brig: one-and-one-half decks (single deck, with raised fore and after castles).
Frigate: two decks, with guns on both.
Ship: three decks.

Sail/rigging:
Sloop: one mast, usually fore-and-aft rigged, but can have a square sail.
Schooner: two or more masts, all fore and aft rigged.
Brig: two masts, square rigged.
Brigantine: two masts, one square and one fore-and-aft rig.
Hermaphrodite Brig: two masts-fore mast has one square sail, top of fore mast and all of mizzenmast F&A rig.
Ship: three or more masts, all square rigged.
Bark (or Barque): three or more masts, all square rigged except for the mizzen, which is F&A.
Barkentine (or Barquentine): three or more masts-formast is square rig, all others are F&A.
******* Bark: any combination other than the above two.

Of course this means that a large sloop-of-war with two masts is called a brig-sloop, and one with three masts is called a ship-sloop.

And sometimes if a small single-masted sloop is using the square sail, it's called a cutter.

And you thought that modern ship terminology was confusing! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Messervy
12-11-2004, 01:34 AM
I am left speachless...but thank you anyway!

Jose.MaC
12-12-2004, 04:51 AM
In spanish, a sloop is a corbeta.

In Verne's novels, sometimes the class of the ship is in english (remember an schooner). Other names, like yatch, have been adapted.

Noline72
12-12-2004, 09:39 AM
could be a coincidence, but i dont think so, in holland we call a small boat "sloep"
pronounced as sloop

http://pictures.werkenbijdemarine.nl/gallerie/maritiem/marhist_powerp/Gewapende%20sloep.jpg

Noline72
12-12-2004, 09:48 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dominicrigg:
Sloop

A dutch designed warship with only one mast. Used extensively in the colonisation of the carribean (can you tell im playing sid miers pirates at the moment lol)

From the dutch word sloep which means to glide.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

oops right http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

Lanzfeld
12-12-2004, 09:49 AM
Hmmmm....

I don't think I would even call "Alarm" for that!

Man the 20mm!

Dominicrigg
12-13-2004, 03:51 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Lanzfeld:
Hmmmm....

I don't think I would even call "Alarm" for that!

Man the 20mm! <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Rofl i was thinking exactly the same... Those are some brave guys in that dutch boat!!!

Noline72
12-13-2004, 06:49 AM
mmm making fun of the royal dutch navy he ?
dont make me ask for a dutch version http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Yarrick_
12-13-2004, 11:20 AM
SailorSeteve:

Frigate in Spanish is called fragata. It has 3 a, not 2 a and an e.

fatty6662004
12-13-2004, 11:35 AM
Hi,

If I understand correctly, a frigate in modern terms is actually a step between a destroyer and a cruiser.

During WWII, a corvette and a sloop were more or less synonymous. I have seen one local WWII memorial, HMCS Sackville referred to as both a Flower-class sloop and a Flower-class corvette.

blue_76
12-13-2004, 11:43 AM
U'll notice many of them were torpedoed by Uboats http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif
http://www.naval-history.net/WW1NavyBritishEscorts.htm