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aminx
12-08-2004, 08:32 PM
Hi,
Got up at 3 a.m today and could'nt go back to sleep, so i switched on my cable tv tcm channel and there was Gary Cooper in full swing in the pacific!!
Devastator: I saw a real devastator with the lexington markings no bull,in black and white taking off,it was'nt a fake "vindicators in the movie MIDWAY" and since the movie was shot after
1945 where is this Devastator today!!??
Action scenes:In my opinion far better than the movie MIDWAY, lots of real footage, kamikaze, the lot.
Wildcats,Dauntlesses,Hellcats:Look great.
Dogfights:All real footage.
Colour;mixed black and white and colour.
Whats the name of the movie?
aminx

VMF223_Smitty
12-08-2004, 08:41 PM
Task Force - 1949

Task Force (http://movies.yahoo.com/shop?d=hv&id=1800189804&cf=info&intl=us)

Review:

Action/Adventure
TASK FORCE far surpasses most action war films in that it focuses on the invention of the air craft carrier and its use in World War II. Gary Cooper stars as Jonathan L. Scott, the patriotic naval tactician. Having studied the science of aerial combat firsthand in World War I, Cooper devises the necessity of jumbo-sized carriers. The government deems the carriers absurd, however, until the Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor. Promoted to Admiral, Scott is given the go ahead to commandeer the U.S.S. Langley on an all scale assault of Japan. A sweeping tale of the history of Naval aviation and the development of the aircraft carrier. The film weaves the human drama of Scott€s up-and-down Naval career with actual combat footage. TASK FORCE is a realistic and informative film. Director Daves gets an extra-charismatic performance from Gary Cooper. Furthermore Daves lays the sequences together with such mastery, that the seamless TASK FORCE zips by from beginning to end within the blink of an eye. Now that's how a history lesson should be.

Main Cast

Main Cast
Gary Cooper as Jonathan L. Scott
Jane Wyatt as Mary Morgan
Wayne Morris as McKinney
Walter Brennan as Pete Richard
Julie London as Barbara McKinney
Bruce Bennett as McCluskey
Jack Holt as Reeves
Stanley Ridges as Senator Bentley
John Ridgely as Dixie Rankin
Richard Rober as Jack Southern
Art Baker as Senator Vincent
Moroni Olsen as Admiral Ames
Ray Montgomery as Pilot
Harlan Warde as Timmy Kissell
Roscoe J. Behan as Ames Attache
Edwin Fowler as Commander Price
Reed Howes as Officer
Mickey McCardle as Lindsay
John McGuire as Supply Officer
Paul McWilliams as Harrison
Mal Merrihugh as Jones
Robert Rockwell as Lieutenant Kelly

lkemling
12-08-2004, 08:42 PM
My moneys on TASK FORCE 1949.....would have loved to see that one as a old Gary Cooper Fan.

VMF223_Smitty
12-08-2004, 08:45 PM
If you don't own this movie, buy it. One of the best of the 40's Pacifc war movies.

VMF223_Smitty
12-08-2004, 09:03 PM
I did some looking for Top 50 World War Two flicks and found this. Not that I agree with the order in which they are listed.
The numbers in ( ) are from a previous survey.
Movies are from various countries.

1) Saving Private Ryan (1)
2) Band of Brothers (2)
3) Das Boot (3)
4) Patton (4)
5) Longest Day (5)
6) A Bridge Too Far (7)
7) The Thin Red Line (1998) (6)
8) Enemy at the Gates (9)
9) Cross of Iron (8)
10) Stalingrad 1992) (10)
11) The Great Escape (11)
12) Midway (12)
13) The Bridge on the River Kwai (13)
14) Schindler's List (15)
15) The Battle of Britain (19)
16) A Midnight Clear (14)
17) Tora! Tora! Tora! (16)
18) In Harm's Way (18)
19) Kelly's Heroes (20)
20) Stalag 17 (17)
21) The Battle of the Bulge (22)
22) Twelve O'clock High (25)
23) Battleground (21)
24) Pearl Harbor (24)
25) The Big Red One (23)
26) The Cruel Sea (29)
27) Guns of Navarone (26)
28) Mister Roberts (28)
29) Where Eagles Dare (27)
30) Sahara (30)
31) Memphis Belle (39)
32) Come and See (31)
33) The Devil's Brigade (37)
34) Mrs Miniver (44)
35) U-571 (32)
36) Soldier of Orange (33)
37) When Trumpet's Fade (34)
38) The Enemy Below (38)
39) Objective, Burma! (35)
40) Sands of Iwo Jima (36)
41) The Bridge at Remagen (47)
42) The Dirty Dozen (40)
43) A Walk in the Sun (41)
44) The Eagle Has Landed (42)
45) The Iron Cross (43)
46) The Victors (45)
47) Wake Island (46)
48) The Tuskegee Airmen (48)
49) Since You Went Away (50)
50) Air Force (49)

s.bush
12-08-2004, 09:09 PM
thanks detailed info,much appreciated,2 days ago they had john wayne on in a pacific movie about an admiral who promoted air power before the conflict with Maureen Ohara, i switched channel after 3 minutes.
aminx

VMF223_Smitty
12-08-2004, 09:15 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by s.bush:
thanks detailed info,much appreciated,2 days ago they had john wayne on in a pacific movie about an admiral who promoted air power before the conflict with Maureen Ohara, i switched channel after 3 minutes.
aminx <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

That movie was a typical John Wayne. It was called "The Wings of Eagles", directed by none other then John Ford (1957) Dan Dailey, Ward Bond, Ken Curtis

aminx
12-08-2004, 09:39 PM
MAN !!
i can't believe john ford could have allowed something like this to be released.
aminx

VMF223_Smitty
12-08-2004, 09:57 PM
Dollar is a dollar. You'll notice it's not on the top 50 (or 100 either)

Barracus0411
12-09-2004, 12:38 AM
Doesn't it concern anybody that historical accuracy is sacrificed for the sake of an American audience and a few dollars?

I know this is a bit off topic but I would be interested in opinions.

VMF223_Smitty
12-09-2004, 12:50 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Barracus0411:
Doesn't it concern anybody that historical accuracy is sacrificed for the http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif sake of an American audience and a few dollars?
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/784.gif
I know this is a bit off http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/353.gif topic but I would be interested in opinions. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Yep it's OT.

But, to answer your question. Who cares? It's not a documentry or historical film we are talking about here. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Barracus0411
12-09-2004, 01:09 AM
It becomes a problem when people begin to replace fact with fiction. In our society individuals are more likely to watch a dvd than read a book, opinions are formed on said fiction and unfortunate conclusions are reached.

A fine example of this is "Braveheart"

Tooz_69GIAP
12-09-2004, 01:38 AM
Anyone seen Churchill: The Hollywood Years?? Oh, that was funny, hehe!!

Acme70
12-09-2004, 01:42 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by VMF223_Smitty:
If you don't own this movie, buy it. One of the best of the 40's Pacifc war movies.


1) Saving Private Ryan (1)
2) Band of Brothers (2)
3) Das Boot (3)
4) Patton (4)
5) Longest Day (5)
6) A Bridge Too Far (7)
7) The Thin Red Line (1998) (6)
8) Enemy at the Gates (9)
9) Cross of Iron (8)
10) Stalingrad 1992) (10)
11) The Great Escape (11)
12) Midway (12)
13) The Bridge on the River Kwai (13)
14) Schindler's List (15)
15) The Battle of Britain (19)
16) A Midnight Clear (14)
17) Tora! Tora! Tora! (16)
18) In Harm's Way (18)
19) Kelly's Heroes (20)
20) Stalag 17 (17)
21) The Battle of the Bulge (22)
22) Twelve O'clock High (25)
23) Battleground (21)
24) Pearl Harbor (24)
25) The Big Red One (23)
26) The Cruel Sea (29)
27) Guns of Navarone (26)
28) Mister Roberts (28)
29) Where Eagles Dare (27)
30) Sahara (30)
31) Memphis Belle (39)
32) Come and See (31)
33) The Devil's Brigade (37)
34) Mrs Miniver (44)
35) U-571 (32)
36) Soldier of Orange (33)
37) When Trumpet's Fade (34)
38) The Enemy Below (38)
39) Objective, Burma! (35)
40) Sands of Iwo Jima (36)
41) The Bridge at Remagen (47)
42) The Dirty Dozen (40)
43) A Walk in the Sun (41)
44) The Eagle Has Landed (42)
45) The Iron Cross (43)
46) The Victors (45)
47) Wake Island (46)
48) The Tuskegee Airmen (48)
49) Since You Went Away (50)
50) Air Force (49)
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Great to see Kellys Heroes in there http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif, I always liked that movie

The_Ant
12-09-2004, 01:51 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Barracus0411:
It becomes a problem when people begin to replace fact with fiction. In our society individuals are more likely to watch a dvd than read a book, opinions are formed on said fiction and unfortunate conclusions are reached.

A fine example of this is "Braveheart" <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

You are so correct, the true battle of Banock burn was not fought out like it´s portrayed in the movie Braveheart,whats more funny is that the scottish king Bruce lead the battle not William Wallace as it´s portrayed in the movie,classic Hollywood ****.
Im not scottish not even from the Uk but i sure know what and what didn´t happen.Why must hollywood always turn history in to fiction and make something thats not true and always make the Soldiers (mostly american soldiers be like a rambo or a john wayne caracter).
Another excample the Nr 1 movie in the list Shaving private Ryan,why do they have to show the scen with mustangs bombing the the tanks.Well it´s a cool scene,but total inacurate,The bombs dropped on the tank would at least be a 125 kg or a 250 kg bomb,and the effect of that is a big boom,those people sorounding the tank in the movie,would either be dead or very dead, buildings would have collapsed a little,especiallly the bridge.But in the movie eveything is nice and fine except Otm Shank who is dying from previous wounds,historical Otm Shank and Matt Damon would be dead.Another great Hollywood **** movie about WW2 must be U-571.How can they make such inacurate fiction garbage.I fell sorry for those whom watch these Hollywood movies and thinks they are historical correct.
The only War movie created recently in Hollywood thats Almost autentic to history is Black hawk down,some certain elements are missing but otherwise it portrays the true conflict as it happend.
Why must every historical movie that seams to be ok,come MOSTLY from europe or by an independant movie maker.Films like Dark blue world,Battle of Britain,Das boot,Stalingrad,Band of brothers many different directors are involved and its based on a book/true story,Tora Tora Tora well it´s a joint production by Hollywood and japan.

VMF223_Smitty
12-09-2004, 05:18 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Barracus0411:
It becomes a problem when people begin to replace fact with fiction. In our society individuals are more likely to watch a dvd than read a book, opinions are formed on said fiction and unfortunate conclusions are reached.

A fine example of this is "Braveheart" <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Not by intelligent people. Yes, it IS a problem when the ability to view or read something and make an informed decision with follow-up research of the facts is absent.
Nothing new there.
But then again people will form their own incorrect or biased opinion, even when given that opportunity.
Please leave it rest. Everything doesn't have to turn into a philosophical discussion on this forum.

ploughman
12-09-2004, 05:46 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Doesn't it concern anybody that historical accuracy is sacrificed for the sake of an American audience and a few dollars? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Oh not again. If you want historical accuracy watch "Churchill, the Hollywood years." Otherwise as long as it doesn't have some yank winnng the Battle of Britain I don't care.

And it was the Battle of Falkirk not the Battle of Bannockburn that featured William Wallace, and was depicted as such in the film Braveheart. It was a historically innaccurate film, but that bit was right.

Barracus0411
12-09-2004, 07:12 AM
Apparently Tom Cruise is making a film where "some yank is winning the Battle of Britain"

I would like to propose a remake of the 'Sands of Iwo Jima' with the Coldstream Guards putting the running the St Georges Cross up on Mt Surabachi.

How about the Alamo, defended by a company of the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry...and winning

s.bush
12-09-2004, 08:29 AM
One of the most ridiculous and out of touch movies maybe even an insult to who fought in vietnam was "green berrets"
s.bush

s.bush
12-09-2004, 08:31 AM
HEY SMITTY


What about platoon?

aminx
12-09-2004, 08:33 AM
i have that one.good stuff.
aminx

aminx
12-09-2004, 08:35 AM
thats not WW2, or else you can add apocalypse now.
aminx

WIFC_Phantom
12-09-2004, 08:37 AM
bush, did you not read. it is "world War films"!!!

it looks like just ww2...not ww1 because there are some real good ww1 films...like 'ze blue max' and 'aces high' 'regeneration' and 'all quiet on the western front'

or even better a ww2 film- esape to athena...it could be anywhere and any time...lol...i love that film! I didnt see midway on the list either...that was an OK film.

Pearl Harbour should not have been voted as good by anyone...it is so bad i root for the Japanese. Same for U571

VMF223_Smitty
12-09-2004, 11:14 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by WIFC_Phantom:
bush, did you not read. it is "world War films"!!!

it looks like just ww2...not ww1 because there are some real good ww1 films...like 'ze blue max' and 'aces high' 'regeneration' and 'all quiet on the western front'

or even better a ww2 film- esape to athena...it could be anywhere and any time...lol...i love that film! I didnt see midway on the list either...that was an OK film.

Pearl Harbour should not have been voted as good by anyone...it is so bad i root for the Japanese. Same for U571 <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Original edited to read World War Two films

duffys_tavern
12-09-2004, 12:15 PM
"Divebomber" with Errol Flyn & Fred McMurray, released in 1941, has excellent color footage of TBDs, F2As, SBDs, shot onboard US carriers in 1940-41.

VMF223_Smitty
12-09-2004, 03:36 PM
Dive Bomber is another Frank Wead written war drama. Frank also wrote the John Wayne movie mentioned earlier, "Wings of Eagles", which was a semi-autobiographical movie. You see naval aviator, turned screewriter, Frank Wead, was a pioneer proponent of the modern carrier navy.

Read a mini-bio about him here Frank Wead (http://us.imdb.com/name/nm0915693/bio)

ploughman
12-09-2004, 04:53 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Original edited to read World War Two American made films as intended. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well you can kiss off half your list then. Including Das Boot, The Battle of Britain, A Bridge too Far, and Memphis Belle.

Memphis Belle is a David Putnam film that was released in the UK before the US because it was made here, by Brits.

Band of Brothers was made here too, with substantial support by the BBC, featuring many fine UK actors, and is symptomatic of the long established relationship Steven Spielberg has with the UK film and television industry.

I don't know this but if The Cruel Sea is American made I'll eat my festering straw hat.

As far as I know Das Boot was a German serialised made for TV show.

Now if you're talking about US funded films we might be in a different place.

The Great Escape, not American either.

etc,... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

VMF223_Smitty
12-09-2004, 05:00 PM
Re-edited to include all. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/mockface.gif

Smitty

VMF223_Smitty
12-09-2004, 05:29 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Ploughman:
I don't know this but if The Cruel Sea is American made I'll eat my festering straw hat. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Republic Studios 1953, starring Jack Hawkins, written by UK author, Nicholas Monsarrat. You want some salt and pepper for the hat. Republic Pictures was founded in 1935 by Herbert Yates, an American Studio, therefor, The Cruel Sea, despite the fact that it has an ensemble of English actors, filmed in England, etc., it is an American made film. Republic was the major independent that made many "B" movies, starring "A" actors.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
The Great Escape, not American either.

etc,... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The Great Escape 1963, directed by John Sturges (American), screenplay by James Clavell (Australian) written by Paul Brickhill (Australian)
Production Company - Mirisch Corp. (US)
Scoring - Samuel Goldwyn (US)
Casting - Stalmaster/Lister (US)

Just because a movie has other then US actors, locations, etc. does not mean that it is not an American Made film.

Sorry my friend, better bone up on your research before you get on my six http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

ploughman
12-09-2004, 05:32 PM
So much better to be a member of a coalition of international WWII film makers rather than going unilateral...wouldn't you agree? If nothing else, it makes for a much bigger list.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/784.gif

ploughman
12-09-2004, 05:35 PM
Nice that you did some, finally. And how about the others?

VMF223_Smitty
12-09-2004, 05:35 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Ploughman:
So much better to be a member of a coalition of international WWII film makers rather than going unilateral...wouldn't you agree? If nothing else, it makes for a much bigger list.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/784.gif <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Please supply your list of European, or more specifically if you wish UK World war two films. I am a fan of cinema in your country as well as mine. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

VMF223_Smitty
12-09-2004, 05:37 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Ploughman:
Nice that you did some, finally. And how about the others? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Necessary ?

ploughman
12-09-2004, 05:44 PM
Sure is. By the way, if it was made in the UK, using UK actors and UK technical staff using US money, how is that US made? A Jaguar is made in England, albeit owned by Ford, is it not, but is still considered made in England...I'm not changing the rules, as I said some films were made using US money, but they were still made here...(Star Wars). If I'm on your six its because you're taking an exceptionally elastic understanding of American made into your interpretation of Amercian made.

VMF223_Smitty
12-09-2004, 05:47 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Ploughman:
Sure is. By the way, if it was made in the UK, using UK actors and UK technical staff using US money, how is that US made? A Jaguar is made in England, albeit owned by Ford, is it not, but is still considered made in England...I'm not changing the rules, as I said some films were made using US money, but they were still made here...(Star Wars). If I'm on your six its because you're taking an exceptionally elastic understanding of American made into your interpretation of Amercian made. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Goodnight Ploughman - Best wishes for the Holiday Season.

ploughman
12-09-2004, 05:53 PM
Et tu.

aminx
12-09-2004, 07:46 PM
ATT VMF-SMITTY

Hi,
its 3.34 a.m again and i'm up watching Lolita on TCM with james mason hoping that TASK FORCE will be repeated again, usually they repeat their movies about 2-3 times in a row over a couple of days before moving on,they dont have a set programme after midnight.


THIN RED LINE:
--------------
About 40 years ago i was in a movie theater in Beirut Lebanon and they where playing the THIN RED LINE,it was a black and white movie and i remember it was about guerilla warfare in the Phillipines,i was enjoying the movie then suddenly something broke down in the theater and we had to call it a day,it was good and dramatic,do you know anything about it?
I was very surprised so many years later when i saw the recent movie with the same title in Guadalcanal.
Actually the term thin red line stems from a tactic used by the red coats 200 years ago or so,am i right?
aminx

aminx
12-09-2004, 07:59 PM
I dont have or never seen:

A midnight clear
In harms way
Battleground
The big red one
the cruel sea
mister roberts
sahara
come and see
mrs Miniver
Awalk in the sun
The victors
Wake island
The tuskagee men
Since you went away

Thats quiet a lot of movies to catch up with, who knows maybe over the years.
aminx

partic_two
12-09-2004, 08:12 PM
I believe the original "Thin Red Line" was, indeed, 200 odd years ago, at Balaclava, Crimea, just before the famous charge of the Light Brigade, when 2 ranks of Highland infantry and their muskets stopped a charge by the Russian Heavy cavalry...

It generally refers to infantry.. grunts.. poor chaps!

VMF223_Smitty
12-09-2004, 08:23 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by aminx:
ATT VMF-SMITTY

About 40 years ago i was in a movie theater in Beirut Lebanon and they where playing the THIN RED LINE,it was a black and white movie and i remember it was about guerilla warfare in the Phillipines,i was enjoying the movie then suddenly something broke down in the theater and we had to call it a day,it was good and dramatic,do you know anything about it?
I was very surprised so many years later when i saw the recent movie with the same title in Guadalcanal.
Actually the term thin red line stems from a tactic used by the red coats 200 years ago or so,am i right?
aminx <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

aminx - Hey buddy. Tried to see if Task Force was available to buy on DVD (no luck). Found it on VHS at Amazon.com for a whopping $45.95 US. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

The original titled The Thin Red Line was made in 1964 and starred 2001: A Space Odyssey's Keir Dullea.
The theme is essentially the same as the current version -- that is, how does man endure in war?
Bad location shots. It wasn't suppose to be P.I. but Guadalcanal like the Sean Penn version. Did'nt know Guadalcanal looked like the high desert of S. Cal http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

VMF223_Smitty
12-09-2004, 08:28 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by partic_two:
I believe the original "Thin Red Line" was, indeed, 200 odd years ago, at Balaclava, Crimea, just before the famous charge of the Light Brigade, when 2 ranks of Highland infantry and their muskets stopped a charge by the Russian Heavy cavalry...

It generally refers to infantry.. grunts.. poor chaps! <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Correct partic !

According to Wikipedia -The Free Encyclopedia

The Thin Red Line was a famous military action by the 93rd (Highland) Regiment during the Crimean War. The 93rd, led by Sir Colin Campbell, took part in actions at Alma and Sevastopol before routing a Russian cavalry charge on October 24, 1854, at Balaklava.

The Russian force of 25,000 rode down the road to Balaklava. It was countered, in part, by a clash with the British Heavy Cavalry, who charged uphill, led by the apparently fearless Sir James Scarlett. The rest of the Russian force went on to charge the 93rd.

Campbell is said to have told his men, "There is no retreat from here, men. You must die where you stand." Sir Colin's aide John Scott is said to have replied, "Aye, Sir Colin. If needs be, we'll do that." Campbell formed the 93rd into a line two deep €" the "thin red line". Convention dictated that the line should be four deep, but the line had to be stretched. Campbell had the regiment wait until very close quarters before the first line fired. The Russians continued to advance, and Campbell had his men wait until no more than 50 yards lay between the Highlanders and the charging Russians to fire the second volley. This broke the Russian charge. At that, some of the Highlanders started forward for a cavalry charge, but Sir Colin stopped them with a cry of "93rd, **** all that eagerness!"

It was The Times correspondent, William H. Russell, who wrote that he could see nothing between the charging Russians and the British base of operations at Balaklava but the "thin red streak tipped with a line of steel" of the 93rd. Popularly condensed into "the thin red line", the phrase became a symbol, rightly or wrongly, for British sangfroid in battle.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c5/93thinl.jpeg

ednew
12-09-2004, 08:40 PM
The "Thin Red Line" was written by James Jones, it was a fictional account of the fighting on Guadalcanal, but Jones did serve there, was wounded and sent back to the US. Read his book,cause the movie took great liberties with the story line.
The phrase The Thin Red Line has been used been used by many to describe that "Small Deadly Place" where men meet on a battlefield.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by partic_two:
I believe the original "Thin Red Line" was, indeed, 200 odd years ago, at Balaclava, Crimea, just before the famous charge of the Light Brigade, when 2 ranks of Highland infantry and their muskets stopped a charge by the Russian Heavy cavalry...

It generally refers to infantry.. grunts.. poor chaps! <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

VMF223_Smitty
12-09-2004, 08:43 PM
ednew -
I agree. The book is a much better read then the movies are a view.

VMF223_Smitty
12-09-2004, 09:13 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by aminx:
I dont have or never seen:

A midnight clear
In harms way
Battleground
The big red one
the cruel sea
mister roberts
sahara
come and see
mrs Miniver
Awalk in the sun
The victors
Wake island
The tuskagee men
Since you went away

Thats quiet a lot of movies to catch up with, who knows maybe over the years.
aminx <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

aminx

A Midnight Clear - Set in 1944 France, an American Intelligence Squad locates a German Platoon wishing to surrender rather than die in Germany's final war offensive. Poor

In Harms Way - A naval officer (John Wayne) reprimanded after Pearl Harbor is later promoted to rear admiral and gets a second chance to prove himself against the Japanese. Typical Wayne

Battleground - A squad of the 101st Airborne Division copes with being trapped in the besieged city of Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge. Great movie.

The Big Red One - Grim story of a WWII squad consisting of an anonymous sergeant and four long-time survivors who ignore the faceless replacements who continually arrive and die.


The Cruel Sea - The World War II adventures of a British convoy escort ship and its officers. Very good movie

Mister Roberts - Henry Fonda in a great role as a supply ship XO who wants to get destroyer duty, but is doomed to serve a nasty skipper (James Cagney) on a beat up "barge".

Sahara - Bogie as Sergeant Joe Gunn and his tank crew pick up five British soldiers, a Frenchman and a Sudanese man with an Italian prisoner crossing the Libyan Desert to rejoin their command after the fall of Tobruk. Classic

Come and See - Haven't seen it

Mrs Miniver - The Minivers, an English "middle-class" family experience life in the first months of World War II. Sets the mood for the time. Good movie

A Walk in the Sun - 1945 Unusually realistic picture of war as long quiet stretches of talk, punctuated by sharp, random bursts of violent action whose relevance to the big picture is often unknown to the soldiers. A sleeper in the sense that it never got the credit it deserved IMO.

The Victors - Haven't seen it in 30 years, but has a powerful statement about how war, any war, ultimately de-humanizes everyone it touches

Wake Island - The movie that launched a thousand ships. The "Alamo" of the Pacific, the movie touched a common chord in all Americans and gave them hope in the darkest days after Pearl Harbor.

The Tuskagee Airmen - The true story of how a group of African American pilots overcame racist opposition to become one of the finest US fighter groups. Good movie

Since You Went Away - War on the homefront.

Barracus0411
12-10-2004, 12:25 AM
Smitty, do you spend every waking moment watching WWII films?

IV_JG51_Razor
12-10-2004, 07:06 AM
Here's two of my all time favorite WWII movies;

"Gallant Hours" A flash back of Adm Halsey's (James Cagney) of the battle for Guadalcanal, and,

"They Were Expendable" The story of PT boats in the Phillipines at the start of the war. One of the Duke's best performances in a war flick IMHO, and considering the time this was made (1943-44), one of the more realistic movies I've ever seen in terms of what it probably was really like, and not a bunch of Gov't-Hollywood Rah Rah BS.

Check them out. I'm a real aviation nut when it comes to my favotite war flicks, but these two are, by far, the best WWII movies on my list - and I've seen all the ones on that previous list. Another that comes close, is "Run Silent, Run Deep" All you Silent Hunter fans out there have seen this one for sure. If you haven't, you owe it to yourself to do so. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

VMF223_Smitty
12-10-2004, 08:00 AM
Thanks Razor

Indeed, those are good ones that didn't make that list. They Were Expendable was another John Ford movie.
The list at the beginning was made up from a survey and of course does not reflect the best movies. It simply reflects the movies that people are familiar with or have watched the most.
There are many other good movies from Russia, Japan, Germany, and France that need to be mentioned. Hopefully, our brothers from these countries will come forward with some.

Other WW II movies that didn't make the list

Never So Few (1959) - Frank Sinatra, Steve McQueen, Peter Lawford - Fighting the Japanese in Burma

Wing and a Prayer (1944) - Don Ameche, Dana Andrew - Pacific action set on a US Navy aircraft carrier in the months following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Torpedo Run (1958) - Glenn Ford, Ernie Borgnine
Sub action in the Pacific

The Desert Rats (1953) Richard Burton, James Mason

Grave of the Fireflies (Hotaru No Haka) (1988) -Perhaps Japan's premier (IMHO) anti-war movie.

Hell in the Pacific (1968) - Lee Marvin, Toshiro Mifune - Marvin and Mifune wage a two-man war as a deadly game between a pair of overgrown children, who finally tire of it and settle into tolerated co-existence and then even something resembling a friendship. An allegorical tale, but well done.

The Best Years of Our Life (1946) - Myrna Loy, Fredric March, Dana Andrews - Although it centers on the readjustment to civilian life of three returning US servicemen, it's a classic, winner of 7 Academt Awards.

Zarathael
12-10-2004, 08:02 AM
Well, I'll just about have to say that I agree 100% with everybody here and their opinions of Hollywood's ***** war movies. While I find several of the movies on you guy's *** list to be quite ENTERTAINING I'll be the first to say that they often have very little in common with reality, and I despair that American movies ever will. Hollywood is too interested in making the correct political statements and making sure everything is dumbed down to the lowest denominator to worry about the facts. Besides that, if they started telling history like it really was, it might challenge too many of their hippy ideas about reality.

And I will have to say that the 1998 "thin red line" probably stands in my book as the absolute crappiest piece of garbage I ever saw. How it made it on the list of the top 50 I have no idea. I'd rather watch "Steel Magnolias"

aminx
12-10-2004, 08:05 AM
WW2 RAF movie
--------------

What about that "DARK BLUE ......."something,a recent movie about a fighter pilot in Britain during WW"?I never saw it,any good?I only saw the poster somewhere a couple of years ago.
aminx

VMF223_Smitty
12-10-2004, 08:10 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Zarathael:
Well, I'll just about have to say that I agree 100% with everybody here and their opinions of Hollywood's ***** war movies. While I find several of the movies on you guy's *** list to be quite ENTERTAINING I'll be the first to say that they often have very little in common with reality, and I despair that American movies ever will. Hollywood is too interested in making the correct political statements and making sure everything is dumbed down to the lowest denominator to worry about the facts. Besides that, if they started telling history like it really was, it might challenge too many of their hippy ideas about reality.

And I will have to say that the 1998 "thin red line" probably stands in my book as the absolute crappiest piece of garbage I ever saw. How it made it on the list of the top 50 I have no idea. I'd rather watch "Steel Magnolias" <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif I'd rather watch "Steel Magnolias" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif LMAO

Agreed - Like I said above, 50 of the most viewed or recognized movies NOT 50 of the BEST, although some of them may be in there.

You are right, Hollywood does what it does best in war movies as well as other genres. Suspends belief. Most often at the expense of reality. Too bad.

As a Marine Corps VN veteran, Platoon (what a joke)ranks right up there with The Thin Red Line as a crappy movie. It wasn't mentioned simply because we are talking WW 2 movies.

aminx
12-10-2004, 09:33 AM
HEY, did'nt we forget "PT109" around 1960.I did enjoy that movie.
aminx

aminx
12-10-2004, 09:41 AM
THE THIN RED LINE MOVIE

Yes i was dissapointed as well when i came out of the theater, it was confusing and erratic, it just did'nt rime in my opinion,then i saw it again on dvd and again and again over the last 4 years and i started to like it,
aminx

VMF223_Smitty
12-10-2004, 01:52 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by aminx:
HEY, did'nt we forget "PT109" around 1960.I did enjoy that movie.
aminx <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yeah. Cliff Roberson, Robert Culp - 1963

VMF223_Smitty
12-10-2004, 04:17 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Barracus0411:
Smitty, do you spend every waking moment watching WWII films? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

No, but I used to when I was a kid. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Quite a bit more selective about my movie viewing now. Basically liked the old 40's movies, because for that odd reason that I get a sense of Deja Vu from them. Probably why I fly a flight sim that takes place in the 40's too. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif
I have been blessed (or cursed) with the ability to remember in great detail things that I read or watch.
I probably read 15 to 20 books a month on various topics. Currently reading (again) "No Better Place to Die" by Cozzens. Excellent American civil war book

aminx
12-10-2004, 09:23 PM
OLD CLASSICS GOOD AND BAD

Thanks to cable tv and here in Switzerland TCM channel it is possible 12 hrs a day to review and enjoy a a lot of oldies(the remaining 12 hrs is cartoon network) which range from very good to very bad and thats part of the fun.I was living in the states 3 years ago and i had cable but i dont remember having a specialized channel on my list or was it TNT?
aminx

heywooood
12-10-2004, 09:41 PM
Stalag 17... Animals' crush on Betty Grable..pure bufoonery...
no actual flying, but a good
story.

VMF223_Smitty
12-10-2004, 10:22 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by heywooood:
Stalag 17... Animals' crush on Betty Grable..pure bufoonery...
no actual flying, but a good
story. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Roger that. "Animal' was played by great character actor Robert Strauss (1913-1975).
Other notable films he was in: Several Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis films (he was a good friend to both of them)
"Sailor Beware" 1952
"Jumping Jacks" 1952
"Family Jewels" 1965

Also played many roles as a crusty old sargeant
including
Un acte d'amour
The Last Time I Saw Archie

Also played in that old science fiction classic from 1959 "The 4D Man"

Probably his best role was that of Pfc. Bernstein in the 1956 war movie "Attack", a early Robert Aldrich film.
Another one not mentioned yet.
Starred Eddie Albert and Lee Marvin

Trivia note: Eddie Albert played a coward in this movie, but in real life he was a war hero, having rescued 70 wounded Marines under heavy fire in one engagement as a Higgins boat commander.
Lee Marvin played in a lot of war movies, but in real life he enlisted in the U.S. Marines at the beginning of World War II. In the battle of Saipan in June 1944, he was wounded in the buttocks by Japanese fire which severed his sciatic nerve.

Barracus0411
12-10-2004, 11:59 PM
Dont know a great deal about the ACW myself, more of a WWI, Medieval and European polirical man myself.

Your knowledge of WWII films is incredible

Barracus0411
12-11-2004, 12:00 AM
sorry *political*

VMF223_Smitty
12-11-2004, 06:13 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Barracus0411:
Your knowledge of WWII films is incredible <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thank you sir. Wish I was a better pilot in this sim http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Barracus0411
12-11-2004, 08:54 AM
With that sentiment amigo, you are not alone

Copperhead310th
12-11-2004, 09:26 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Tooz_69GIAP:
Anyone seen Churchill: The Hollywood Years?? Oh, that was funny, hehe!! <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

My fovorite Chruchill-ism. lol

Once when askled why he liked pigs so much and kept so many around the estate he simply replied in his usually Wisnton manner....

"Because Dogs look up to people. Cat's look down on people....But a pig...well a pig will threat a man as his equal."
lol

Barracus0411
12-11-2004, 09:32 AM
His best one liners were in response to his 'straight guy' Lady Astor

"If you were my husband I would poison your brandy"

"If I were your husband Madam I would drink it!"

DuxCorvan
12-11-2004, 09:44 AM
What I'm worried is about the formation of young people who never open a book, but go to the cinema, to see, for example 'Gladiator' -which is really spectacular and entertained- and think that that's the way things happened.

As for that film:

1) Armors and warfare stuff is erroneus. Popular as they are -because they look great and are shown in Trajan's Column, the most known of Roman representations of war- loric¦ segment¦ were in disuse towards the end of 2nd Century. Although it was still used by some guys, chain mails were more common. The same goes for the Roman typical helmets. In fact, low Empire soldiers looked much like Middle-Age warriors. Besides, they ignore completely the main rule of Roman warfare: they break the formation for the close combat. Roman legion success was based in the strength of disciplined tight lines of men fighting shoulder on shoulder.

2) It's not necessary to say that Marcus Aurelius wasn't murdered by his son.

3) Romans of then used to have beard. It was the fashion of then, and Commodo himself had a big big beard, that he was very proud of.

4) During the High Empire, Roman Senate was more an instrument of Emperor than an opposing force to his power. It's ridiculous to think of Commodo trying to destroy an aristocratic institution that was the base of his own power. In fact the Senate was by then very angry for the margination that Commodo and his dinasty had imposed on them. He had no need of destroying it, he had it disabled. That was the cause of his tragic end, there were constant conjurations set against him during all his reign. Senate was behind most of them, but even so, Commodo never dared to supress the most charismatic and loved of Roman institutions. People and Army would have killed him at once. BTW, Senate hated Commodo for his support of ecuestre class of knights before the nobles, not because of them wanting more power.

5) Commodo ruled for twelve years. He was just 19 when he started. In the movie it looks like he reigned just a few months. It's true that he was a very strong man who liked to participate in faked gladiator games, specially fighting beasts, and he was despised for that. But he was not killed in the arena by a revengeful general. He tried to have some new senators killed, they knew and hired Commodo's personal trainer, a slave called Narciso, who strangled him during a 'too real' training. The Senate asked then a ****atio memori¦ to despise his memory.

4) Lucilla, his treacherous sister, who formed part of the final conjuration, was widow... and was happily married again with Pompeyan, one of Marcus Aurelius' favourite generals. Of course he was not the movie main character.

5) After the death of Commodo, there was no republic in Rome. Praetorians sold the title to Pertinax, a rich libert, and then to Didius Julian. Both were assasinated by the same praetorians just after a few months. Septimius Severus took the power and started a new dinasty of emperors. Of course, nobody ever thought of restoring the republican traditions.

'Gladiator' is a big spectacle. It could be also a historical film but it isn't. I know that it's not the aim of a movie to give History lessons, but at least they should not plainly lie.

Goose_Green
12-11-2004, 10:26 AM
Talking of WWII movies - The "Battle of Britain" film was shot using aircraft that formed the 35th largest airforce in the world at the time of filming.

Filmed over Spain and England the aerial filming was conducted from a modified B-24 Liberator. Hurricanes, Spitfires and 109's were rescued from the scrap yard, the Spanish Air Force donated the principle bombers used such as the Dorniers and H-111.

One of the better war films which is quite accurate in portraying the events that enabled Britian to prevent a German invasion and later to be used as an "Aircraft Carrier" for US and UK & Commenwealth forces to prepare for the final assualt on Fortress Europa (D-Day). http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Barracus0411
12-11-2004, 10:33 AM
Everything from the musical score to the beauty of the aircraft make that film superior to all others

DuxCorvan
12-11-2004, 10:37 AM
Pity that they used those Spanish license-built variants of 109. They are pretty ugly.

Goose_Green
12-11-2004, 10:40 AM
Totally agree, every detail was followed and the aerial shots of the airbases that were bombed (RAF Duxford was used for these) were something else.

Talking about RAF Duxford, the airbase was part of 12 Group that featured Mallory's Big Wing.

Duxford is now a museum run by the Imperial War Museum and has some very fine exibits. To find out more visit the link below;
IWM Duxford (http://duxford.iwm.org.uk/)

Barracus0411
12-11-2004, 11:26 AM
I presume that youv've already been to Hendon Goose

VMF223_Smitty
12-11-2004, 11:38 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by DuxCorvan:
What I'm worried is about the formation of young people who never open a book, but go to the cinema, to see, for example 'Gladiator' -which is really spectacular and entertained- and think that that's the way things happened.

'Gladiator' is a big spectacle. It could be also a historical film but it isn't. I know that it's not the aim of a movie to give History lessons, but at least they should not plainly lie. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Salute Dux - Your posts are usually right on target. You are very correct about two profound statements that you made.

1. There is no substitute for a book. The visual stimulation that is the cinema's major attribute is a poor second compared to the visceral impact that the written word can expressn or convey. Any civilization that tries to lessen the importance of reading with another medium of story-telling is making a large mistake. Instead, all of these mediums should be used in concert to advance knowledge, as well as entertain the people.

2. The people who produce, write and present historical movies should get it right. Revisionist historians have caused enough misinformation and confusion.

Goose_Green
12-11-2004, 11:39 AM
No I haven't, not sure where it is - must look it up.

VMF223_Smitty
12-11-2004, 11:42 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Barracus0411:
Everything from the musical score to the beauty of the aircraft make that film superior to all others <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

"Battle of Britain" is one movie I would love to see re-made with the dedication of the first. With 21st century FX, this movie would be utterly fantastic

Goose_Green
12-11-2004, 11:48 AM
Yes you are right and it's an interesting point to make;

The last time I saw it (I have it on DVD) I always thought the special FX is the one area a remake would improve.

CG aircraft could be used but would not match the originals. I always thought the original actors were casted perfectly.

Barracus0411
12-11-2004, 12:30 PM
Agreed, some of the effects are a little ropey, but I'm not sure if the film could be effectively remade, the casting was superb.

Goose - Hendon is off junction 2 of the M1 just north of London

aminx
12-11-2004, 12:55 PM
In my opinion the battle scenes from

They Were Expendable" The story of PT boats in the Phillipines at the start of the war. One of the Duke's best performances in a war flick IMHO, and considering the time this was made (1943-44), one of the more realistic movies I've ever seen in terms of what it probably was really like, and not a bunch of Gov't-Hollywood Rah Rah BS.

reminded me of when i played with my plastic boats in the bathtub when i was 5 years old.
aminx

aminx
12-11-2004, 01:00 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by VMF223_Smitty:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by DuxCorvan:
What I'm worried is about the formation of young people who never open a book, but go to the cinema, to see, for example 'Gladiator' -which is really spectacular and entertained- and think that that's the way things happened.

'Gladiator' is a big spectacle. It could be also a historical film but it isn't. I know that it's not the aim of a movie to give History lessons, but at least they should not plainly lie. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Salute Dux - Your posts are usually right on target. You are very correct about two profound statements that you made.

1. There is no substitute for a book. The visual stimulation that is the cinema's major attribute is a poor second compared to the visceral impact that the written word can expressn or convey. Any civilization that tries to lessen the importance of reading with another medium of story-telling is making a large mistake. Instead, all of these mediums should be used in concert to advance knowledge, as well as entertain the people.

2. The people who produce, write and present historical movies should get it right. Revisionist historians have caused enough misinformation and confusion. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thats why last summer i started reading serious and highly recomended books on the pacific conflict at a rate of one a month and then discussing them at length with my son to get ourselves properly educated on the subject.
aminx

ploughman
12-11-2004, 01:07 PM
Humble pie.

Smitty, reviewing my comments of Thursday night I can only apologise for being a lemon flavoured butt-head. I'd like to make an exscuse but what can I say? There is nothing to say. I enjoyed eating my hat (well not really, it was a nice hat) and although the notion of what constitutes the nationality of a film is a seam to be richly mined, I was aggressively inarticulate that night and failed to express myself in a gentlemanly manner. Sorry fella'.

aminx
12-11-2004, 01:31 PM
the price of BATTLE OF BRITAIN and THIN RED LINE dvd is around 20 euros on the shelves here while the longest day is half that price.In US currency that is around 24 usd and 12 usd.
aminx

VMF223_Smitty
12-11-2004, 03:58 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Ploughman:
Humble pie.

Smitty, reviewing my comments of Thursday night I can only apologise for being a lemon flavoured butt-head. I'd like to make an exscuse but what can I say? There is nothing to say. I enjoyed eating my hat (well not really, it was a nice hat) and although the notion of what constitutes the nationality of a film is a seam to be richly mined, I was aggressively inarticulate that night and failed to express myself in a gentlemanly manner. Sorry fella'. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ploughman - You just proved to me that you are undoubtly a gentlemen as well as a scholar. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif
I owe you an apology as well. The Cruel Sea is legally listed as a UK film. I did some research last night on the production company, etc. I'll buy you a new fedora. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif
As an added: The British cinema has always been a major player on the world scene. It should come as no surprise that a nation that has produced some of the greatest authors in history would be any less.

Salute and Merry Christmas

VMF223_Smitty
12-11-2004, 04:03 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Barracus0411:
Agreed, some of the effects are a little ropey, but I'm not sure if the film could be effectively remade, the casting was superb.

Goose - Hendon is off junction 2 of the M1 just north of London <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Make that a trio of agreement. The cast was perfect. It would be very difficult to find the caliber today.

VMF223_Smitty
12-11-2004, 04:21 PM
Some other WW 2 movies that weren't mentioned I believe:

British
Spitfire (?)
Contraband (1940)
Hope and Glory (1987)
In Which We Serve (1942)


German
The Bridge (Die Brucke) (1959)
Stalingrad (German/Swedish) (1993)

Japanese
Burmese Harp (Biruma no tategoto) (1956)
The Cockpit (1993) (animated)

Russian
The Cranes are Flying (Letyat Zhuravli) (1957)
My Name Is Ivan (Ivan's Childhood)(Ivanovo detstvo) (1963)

American
Go For Broke! (1951)
Gung Ho! (1943)
So Proudly We Hail! (1943)
Three Came Home (1950)
A Wing and a Prayer (1944)

French
Man Escaped (Un Con****e a Mort s'est Echappe, ou, Le Vent Souffle) (1956)

Italian
Paisan (1948)

Finland
Unknown Soldier (Tuntematon Sotilas) (1955)

aminx
12-12-2004, 08:04 AM
i have only seen Stalingrad,very good.
aminx

aminx
12-12-2004, 08:06 AM
SMITTY

When americans went to see a movie during the period 1943-1952 what was the entrance fee?
aminx

VMF223_Smitty
12-12-2004, 09:43 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by aminx:
SMITTY

When Americans went to see a movie during the period 1943-1952 what was the entrance fee?
aminx <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

aminx

Larger cities with the more opulent theaters (and some were very, very ritzy) charged .25 to .50 for a ticket. remember that most theaters showed double features + selected short subjects (travel docs., Pathe News, etc.) + plus several cartoons + a science fiction serial or the Lone Ranger. This of course was the standard and some areas of the country charged less or more.
Smaller towns with smaller theaters would charge a dime for admission and you basically got the same deal. Popcorn and GIANT candy bars were a nickel and smoking was allowed in almost all theaters, although most had a smoking mezzanine or balconey. Coca Cola was a nickel. Pepsi Cola came out with a 12 ounce bottle (Coke was 6 ounces then) and their jingle was:

"Pepsi-cola hits the spot!
Twelve full ounces... that's a lot.
Twice as much for a nickel, too.
Pepsi-cola is the drink for you!"


I'm 55 years old and well remember that when my brother and I first started going to our small town theater by ourselves (circa 1956), we paid a dime for admission (under 12) and were shocked when it went up to a quarter. Adults paid a quarter at that time and their price went up to fifty cents.
Popcorn was a dime as well as most candy. Even at that time there was a Feature, selected short subject and several cartoons. Double Features were weekend events only. Matinees were half price with an adult ticket.