PDA

View Full Version : Il-2 & BoB on Linux?



RAF_Loke
01-15-2007, 06:08 AM
I'm about to build an Ubuntu machine and then my Q is, will Il-2 be able to run on such a machine? And will Maddox team make BoB able to run on Linux?<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://www.balbo-net.org/pictures/banner-small.jpg (http://www.balbo-net.org)

csThor
01-15-2007, 06:44 AM
Short answer: Nope.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

______________________________
Ab heute heissen wir Meier!

http://home.arcor.de/csthor/bilder/ubi_sig.jpg

Redwulf 32 - Nis
01-15-2007, 11:35 AM
Il-2 runs fine under Linux using Wine (the application not the beverage http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif). Actually with slightly higher fps according to some. I see no reason why BoB shouldn't work under Wine as well.

I haven't got the details here but there was a thread about that some time ago.

I've tested the dedicated server under Wine myself - works like a charm. On the other hand, getting HyperLobby to work is different thing - didn't have any success so I've given it up for the time being (need to update my Wine to a newer revision).<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://redwulf.adelby.dk/images/fenris.jpg

Ugly_Kid
01-15-2007, 12:27 PM
Originally posted by csThor:
Short answer: Nope.

IL-2 runs under Linux with wine, quite without problems. Also given that competition other products of the sim genre (i.e. Targetware, X-Plane) already provide linux versions I think it would be shortsighted not to consider it as an option at all.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://www.f19vs.se/fokker_now.jpg

Aaron_GT
01-15-2007, 01:55 PM
You can get better frame rates with many games using Wine (or Cedega for which I used to have a subscription) if you have an Nvidia card. I stupidly went and got a an ATI 9800 Pro believing ATI's hype about improved Linux drivers. With an ATI card the OpenGL 3D performance is dire.

Support for Track IR, force feedback, etc., is another matter.

I'm half tempted to pick up an AGP Nvidia card with equivalent performance to the 9800 Pro. A machine upgrade will wait until BoB SOW is out and has its first service pack I think!

I wonder if CFS3, FS2004, FSX etc will run decently under Linux!

LEXX_Luthor
01-15-2007, 05:38 PM
Game devs will have to do something, as Vista is going to fail as a gaming system, as well as double the costs to own an equivalent computer.

I did not know about FB and Wine. Thanks for that. I've always been looking for a reason to look at linux, this could be it.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

__________________
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif Flyable Swedish "Gladiator" listed as J8A...in FB Gold...and...Aces Expansion Pack

"You will still have FB, you will lose nothing" ~WUAF_Badsight
"I had actually pre ordered CFS3 and I couldnt wait..." ~Bearcat99
"At the altitudes this community flies at, diving is not an option." ~Stiglr
"Gladiator and Falco, elegant weapons of a more civilized age" ~ElAurens
"109Z flew briefly, after being hit by a bomb. Go-229 also saw combat, when the factory was overrun." ~pingu666
:
"Where you did read about Spitfire made from a wood?
Close this book forever and don't open anymore!" ~Oleg_Maddox http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

csThor
01-15-2007, 11:35 PM
Actually I wanted to be more specific, but that fr***** board software had more errors in the last few days than the latest german health system reform http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

I am aware that Il-2 runs on Linux using emulators, so I was talking about native support for the Client. In spite of the posts here Linux is a negligable entity when it comes to gameing OS'ses. It's a niche of the gameing market and flightsims are a niche of the gameing market. To ask Maddox Games (a team that is already small enough for the tasks at hand) to make a client for Linux is IMO not wise speaking of business sense and financial reward. Comparisons to X-Plane and Targetware do not really work as X-Plane belongs to the much bigger market of civilian flight sims while Targetware does not have a real development schedule and deadlines. Apples and Oranges here.

IMO the best we can hope for is a Linux-based Dedicated Server.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

______________________________
Ab heute heissen wir Meier!

http://home.arcor.de/csthor/bilder/ubi_sig.jpg

cmirko
01-16-2007, 12:10 AM
in my humble opinion dedicated servers/server (COOP and DF) MUST be linux friendly.....

hardware is very cheap these days and a lot of people would like to host their servers - to buy a Microsoft OS just for hosting dedicated servers is (again) IMHO total waste of money and resources.....

RAF_Loke
01-16-2007, 12:56 AM
Originally posted by cmirko:
to buy a Microsoft OS just for hosting dedicated servers is (again) IMHO total waste of money and resources.....

LOL http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

I heard about wine to be used as emulator. This really sounds good http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif.

Oh Nis: I've just registred at www.ubuntudanmark.dk (http://www.ubuntudanmark.dk) http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://www.balbo-net.org/pictures/banner-small.jpg (http://www.balbo-net.org)

Aaron_GT
01-16-2007, 02:54 AM
I am aware that Il-2 runs on Linux using emulators,

Wine is not an emulator. In fact Wine stands for wine is not an emulator! It's a compatibility layer.


In spite of the posts here Linux is a negligable entity when it comes to gameing OS'ses. It's a niche of the gameing market and flightsims are a niche of the gameing market. To ask Maddox Games (a team that is already small enough for the tasks at hand) to make a client for Linux is IMO not wise speaking of business sense and financial reward. Comparisons to X-Plane and Targetware do not really work as X-Plane belongs to the much bigger market of civilian flight sims while Targetware does not have a real development schedule and deadlines. Apples and Oranges here.

Windows has been a minority gaming platform too until recently as most games are played on consoles. The popularity of the Xbox 360 is what is changing that.

The sensible approach is to make the code as cross-platform as possible with compatibility layers where required, which might well include graphics engines, net code, etc. to make it possible to easily port the game to run on the widest variety of platforms.

The biggest issue with Linux is the fragmentation and the rapidity of updates which would make testing rather complex. A partial solution to this is the use of live distributions. Given that we will be seeing fragmentation in the Windows market too (XP and Vista being less compatible than XP and 2000, and also Vista coming in so many flavours) I can see PC games possibly moving to this model in general over the next few years. The wild cards here are what underlying OS will be used (you can bet Microsoft will try to get its foot in the door if this looks likely to happen) and how it can be set up to interact nicely with hardware, not least due to the amount of DRM-related parts in future hardware.

PC games are in the minority, and I think this will only get more so as I suspect there will be a move away from the all-in-one PC for office use and gaming and instead a console for games, and a laptop for emailing and web surfing in the future. I wouldn't be surprised if the generation of sims after BoB:SOW are targeted exclusively at consoles, sims being a minority market even now.

LEXX_Luthor
01-16-2007, 03:31 AM
Correct Aaron, Wine Is Not an Emulator ~> http://www.winehq.com/site/myths

How well does FB perform under wine?

Combat flight sims as "niche within niche" market (*) implies they may do well under a "niche" operating system such as Linux, or may not. We don't know. We do know that maintaining the Windows cfs status quo will result in continued market failure except for Microsoft's own combat flight sims which depend on artificial marketing weight on the game store shelves. Granted, there are other factors involved, such as developers needing to learn to create air war simulation to maintain customer interest, as the combat flight sims cannot compete with the ground shooter games on their own turf of perfect polygon 3D models like tanks and trains.

(*) A niche product maintains value over time, thus combat flight sims are mainstream market failures. Perhaps the run around this definition is online sales (and mail order) where the sales price bypasses the game stores.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

__________________
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif Flyable Swedish "Gladiator" listed as J8A...in FB Gold...and...Aces Expansion Pack

"You will still have FB, you will lose nothing" ~WUAF_Badsight
"I had actually pre ordered CFS3 and I couldnt wait..." ~Bearcat99
"At the altitudes this community flies at, diving is not an option." ~Stiglr
"Gladiator and Falco, elegant weapons of a more civilized age" ~ElAurens
"109Z flew briefly, after being hit by a bomb. Go-229 also saw combat, when the factory was overrun." ~pingu666
:
"Where you did read about Spitfire made from a wood?
Close this book forever and don't open anymore!" ~Oleg_Maddox http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

bazzaah2
01-16-2007, 05:28 AM
I must get Wine! FB is pretty much the only reason I still use XP.

Ubuntu Edgy is neat, esp with Beryl.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://www.endlager.net/fis/pix/banners/fis_banner_05.gif

Crashing online as :FI:SpinyNorman

Normally Spiny Norman was wont to be about
twelve feet from snout to tail, but when Dinsdale was depressed Norman could be
anything up to eight hundred yards long.

Ugly_Kid
01-16-2007, 06:03 AM
Originally posted by Aaron_GT:
The sensible approach is to make the code as cross-platform as possible with compatibility layers where required, which might well include graphics engines, net code, etc. to make it possible to easily port the game to run on the widest variety of platforms.


Exactly, an issue with which many "professional" software deliverers also have to come clear. The laziest go and distribute Red Hat compatible binaries and the rest is for the user to risk whether it runs on his platform. Partly rather stupid since not many want to restrict their desktop system to Red Hat environment, which a) against the whole idea of linux costs b) is not that up-to-date c) not the most comfortable.

I believe X-Plane was quite ready until somebody took it to himself to provide a compilation for linux. Some other sims like Silent Wings is available, Flight Gear. The fact is that many professional simulation software is done on linux platform (Unix being dead sooner or later) so for many with aeronautics background working with linux is not that weird. Of course as a gaming platform one can't forget Windows but a cross compilation is really worth a thought. Well, as long as we talk about simming, if we talk about gaming PS3 or Wii compilation is perhaps more profitable http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif I am not sure I have Windows at all anymore the day BoB comes out. The few games I have are the only reason why I still bother...<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://www.f19vs.se/fokker_now.jpg

Aaron_GT
01-16-2007, 12:35 PM
I use Ubuntu. It's not perfect but it is pretty good, and synaptic is very nice.


the combat flight sims cannot compete with the ground shooter games on their own turf of perfect polygon 3D models like tanks and trains.

I predict that FPS games will become pretty much console-only in a couple of years. Maybe some will come out on PC as well as a by product of cross-platform programming and design, but since the serious FPS player is going to have one of the consoles why test on a variety of hardware and OS versions when you can just test on the PS3 and Xbox 360 and Wii.

Whether flight sims will exist in a PC niche or will need to migrate to consoles within the next half decade I am not sure. The consoles are powerful enough. The PS3 is perhaps a little tricky in terms of utilising all the DSPs but the compiler technology is ramping up given that IBM now offers this technology as an HPC system too.


The laziest go and distribute Red Hat compatible binaries and the rest is for the user to risk whether it runs on his platform.

That's the downside of the fragmentation of the Linux market - either you compile/test for a few platforms and risk incompatibility or for many and risk spiraling costs. Live distributions get you out of some of that risk, but at the cost of not being forward compatible with future hardware (this is where consoles win out). I am not sure if there is an easy fix. In a few years, though, you could probably fit a decent distribution along with a flight sim on a flash card and just plug in and go. Suddenly it becomes like putting cartridges in those old Atari consoles of 25 years ago!


The few games I have are the only reason why I still bother [With Windows]

If Steinberg ported Cubase to Linux too that would be good.