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View Full Version : A couple of 'war stories' I wrote up...



Jazz-Man
03-19-2005, 06:11 AM
Borth from the SH3 campaign, all taken directly from the events of the mission. I've posted them at a couple of sites I frequent, thought I'd share them here. Might pull a few more of you who are wondering if the game is any good, or worth buying into the joy that is this game for me http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Both missions were run with "Event Camera" and "Scope stablization" as the only 'easy' settings I'm allowing myself http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> U-Boat, Type II
Designation U-2

Day 1, we setout this morning before sunrise from Wilhelmshaven for sector Alfa-November 81, assigned to patrol this sector for 24 hours. Running the diesal engines, we managed to reach AN81 in good time, and began our patrol, setting up an inward spiral from the NW corner and inward. No contacts were made our first day.

Day 2, the Kriegsmarine HQ authorized this patrol for 24 hours. We've yet to have made any contacts and I've held the ship in it's patrol. The men are getting restless and moral is low. I should hate to return to port without sinking atleast one British cargo ship, and I know that my men only want to see some action to boost their spirits.

Day 3, We've been on patrol for 36 hours now, and no contacts. My officers are exhausted, and we're operating on a skeleton crew right now so that when the time comes we will be ready. We've had to surface to recharge the batteries, and I've taken the first watch on the sail. It's dark now, but the sun should be up soon. Curse this rain! It hasn't let up since we reached the patrol sector.

Hour 42, Nearly 2 days into the patrol, almost twice the authorized patrol length, and no contacts reported by sonar or radar. A pair seamen have been given the last watch of the day before sun down, their officers need rest and we don't expect contacts before sun down, as sonar and radar have still reported nothing. Needing a breath of fresh air, I step out onto the sail and to my horror, a British warship is steaming right for us! Dashing below, I command the master engineer to dive the ship, emergency! ****! The water here is not deep enough, if that Destroyer gets any closer, we'll be dead. Where's my propulsion!!!

I can hear the engine crew scrambling to get the electric motor up and running, and the propellor whirls to life, only 2 knots... we'll never out run that warship at this speed. Make course for that ship! Weapons officer, get a crew into the forward torpedo room! SCHNELL!!!

My weapons officer stares at me as if I had been speaking Russian, in my impatience I slap him accross the face! "Get me a crew to the forward torpedo room now, or we're all dead!" the terror finally registers on his face and he scrambles off, pulling young sailors from their bunks as he runs toward the foward compartments.

I turn to the parascope, raising it as quickly as I can.. the British ship is closing on us quickly, headed right for us! I can see the British sailors on the deck, preparing the deck guns, and then the first muzzle flash lights up the dusk sky, "Incomming!!!!" I can see through my scope the round arcing up towards us and then sails harmlessly overhead, They missed! They missed!

Finally confirmation from my weapons officer, the torpedo room is manned. "Manuevering, make heading 032, propulsion, make turns for 5 knots! I've got to have 5 knots!" The next rounds were longer, it won't take the British long to realize we're headed right for them too, and I don't want to be anywhere near where they think I am.

Engine room to the bridge, we need more men down here!

"Schiesse!" and I turn to my navigator who's busy staring at his charts, awaiting my offer of a solution, "Get back to the engine room now, we don't have time for a firing solution!" and he takes off much faster than the weapons officer did!

Turning back to the parascope, "Enemy contact bearing 000, closing fast, it's not manuevering! Fire tube 1! Fire tube 2!" The torpedo tube doors creak open, it feels like hours before they finally clear the bays, everything is happening in slow motion now, the destroyer is only 100m away! Then suddenly the whooshing sound of compressed air and the high pitch squeel of a torpedo leaving the tube, then another, and now I wish only to be able to slow the world back down. The torpedos sucking the very sands of time through the hour glass, everything seemingly accelerating, my head reeling at the rapidity of it all as if God were standing behind me, "It's alright Captain, I'll make sure this is painless...." and then,

KABOOM

KABOOM

Two direct hits! The bow of the Frigate is lifted up out of the water, as the two enormous plumes of fire rip their way back into it's bridge, bucking the ship like a wild stallion, and slamming her into the heavy ocean waves, diving deep down below them, and I know she'll never recover. British sailors at the front of the boat were lucky, the explosions claimed them. The sailors on the stern, preparing to drop their depth charges on us were not so lucky, being thrown from the rear of the ship, up over the bridge and into the icy waves, like shot from a scatter gun. It's all sureal, I've never seen men die before, and I find myself unable to take my eyes off of the parascope. Now only 25m from the Frigate and alarms go off in my head, "Right full rudder! All back full!" the crew performs their duty perfectly, as our U-Boat banks sharply to the right, and the engine screams to pull us back away from the crashing frigate, no more than 10m in front of us. Closer and closer, the only thing left to do now is pray. There is nothing better or more than the crew can do now. As our boat wrenches itself around in the stormy ocean, the debris of the frigate scraping along the hull, the realization of what we've done begins to sweep over us. The whole ship, together, anticipates the collision, and as the last sounds of debris richochet off our hull and fade off into the icy atlantic waters, the crew erupts in cheers!

I slump the deck, exhausted but also very pleased. This was an untested vessal, and an untested crew. For forty two hours we had been onboard this vessal, now we were serving aboard her together, and for a few moments there in AN81, there were no officers and no enlistedmen, no arisocrats or factory workers, on board U-2, there was only a crew, and we'd survived... <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> My second patrol with the new Type VIIb Unterseebooten, U-43. I've had the shipyard outfit her with the 88mm deck gun as well as a single 20mm flak gun.

Setting out from Wilhelmshaven at 0400 hours, my ship has been assigned to patrol sector Bravo Foxtrot 56. Scanning over my map, I realize to my... I don't know, a dazzling combination of horror and amusement, that I will have to sail through the channel. The water is not deep there, and there is precious little ocean for a U-Boat to hide in, my only hope is to make the trip under the protection of dark.

Log Entry 2,

Two contacts spotted directly in front of me, approximately Alfa November 81. The weapons officer has identified them as armed trawlers of the British navy. Both ships are headed away from me at 5 knots. This new type VIII is much faster, I can easilly maintain 9 knots surfaced. From 5000m it is unlikely they've seen me yet in the pre-dawn light. I prepare my crew for combat and submerge to parascope depth when I''ve closed off 2000m of distance. I adeptly raise my parascope a fraction of a meter above the gentle swaying waves of the North Sea. The electric motor is performing wonderfully, 6 knots now underwater, I can still close with the two vessals. Now 1000m from the furthest target, I dip my parascope even lower, the waves cooperating as I find myself in a trough between the waves. I order my weapons officer to give me a solution. He does, and I go to the map table to check his work. Satisfied, I order torpedo door 3 opened. We've 2 electic torpedos loaded in tubes 3 and 4, and I don't want to alert the trawlers with the wake of the steam powered fish just yet. I lauch my first eel and dip my parascope under the water to see it flash from the tube and whir away in the dark waters. Raising the parascope again, I prepare to fire on the closer target. My weapons officer again gives me a solution, and again I go over it just in case. I don't yet trust Max's abilities to perform under pressure. My naval academy ring still imprinted in the side of his face from the last time...

Now only 550m away, I finalize the solution, open door 4, and fire my second torpedo of the patrol. Max and I check our stop watches, almost perfect, the two torpedos will arrive on target, if all goes well, within seconds of one another. His eyes meet mine, anticipating a kind look. He'll have his congradulations when the English are at the bottom of the sea!

Both torpedos running smoothly, both set to magnetic detonation at 4m depth. The trawlers draft 3.5m according to the latest papers,... we'll see how good our intelligence is...

500m in front of U-43, the second torpedo screams in underneathe propellor and rudder aseembly of the trawler, continues on for a fraction of a second and detonates perfectly, one half meter beneat the keel of the ship. The center of the trawler lifts up out of the water as the bridge is ripped in half. Explosions rock the two halves of the boat as unexpelled munitions are caught in the blast. The rear of the trawler completel disintigrates in front of my eyes and the bow bucks wildly backwards like an untamed horse, sinking rapidly. Before the more distant trawler can even react, my first torpedo catches it's propellor, totally destroying it's rudder and propulsion systems. Full reserves in the back of the boat produce a scope rattling explosion a few seconds later, and the second trawler, my first target, sinks slowly backwards into the black depths... The English should pay better attention.

Log Entry 3,

We've approached the narrows of the channel with almost perfect timing. Then sun has just begun dipping down beneath the horizon and it will be dark soon. I've been resting in my quarters when the watch officer bellows into the command station, "Three contacts, moving fast towards us, medium range!"

I kick my feet over the edge of my bed, not bothering to put my boots back on. As I run through the bow quarters, I drag our new deck gun specialist with me up to the bridge. ripping the binoculars from the hands of the WO, I quickly spot the 3 ships moving towards us. Grabbing the UZU I identify them as patrol boats. "Man the deck gun!" I scream forgetting that the gunner is not a meter behind me, "Well, get down there!" he hurries down to the gun, and I order the ship increased to flanking speed. If these boats wanted an easy target, they chose to attack the wrong boat! "Full left rudder, be quick on it! Deck gun, engage enemy ship bearing 002, fire at will! Target the waterline!" the first shells begin arcing away from my U-Boat and moments later we come into range of their light machineguns. The nearest English schnellboot isn't even manuevering. Calling for adjustments, I bring the arc of fire down slightly, and a round punctures the bow waterline of the first enemy vessal. At full speed, the ship floods itself at nearly 13 knots, water can't help but filly all front comparments, and the 3rd ship of this patrol piledrives itself *** over bow, down through the waves.

At this point, the deck gunner is automatic, his skill with the weapon is unquestionable as he makes short work of the other two patrol boats. Unfortunately, any jubilation is sort lived, as large calibre rounds begin splashing in the water around our ship. "Two destroyers, bearing 043, long range, 5500m!" and to my astonishment, the deck gunner swings his 88mm cannon around and begins firing shells. Even with all of my course reversals and at flanking speed, I can see explosiong lighting up the enemy ship, then, as another shell leaves our gun, a secondary explosion lights up the Dover cliffs in the distance. Another mutions explosion! The destroyer crippled, lists heavilly to port and disappears beneath the waves. Now 3000m from the 2nd destroyer, I order the ship to dive, "Up attack parascope! Arm tubes 1 and 2! Open doors 1 and 2! Weapons Officer, give me a solution!" I don't even wait for a reply, "Fire both tubes!" two steam powered torpedoes leave tubes 1 and 2 at high speed, set for a short range all out sprint. 2000m out, the destroyer begins a left hand turn and my heart sinks. Surely, our eels have missed! A few moments go by and then, to my astonishment, he rudders hard to starboard, right accross the path of my torpedos! There is still a chance! My greatest hopes are confirmed a few seconds later as my stopwatch reaches 0, first one, then a second massive explosion rock the British destoyer, pulling the mast of the ship down into the water on it's port side. As she fills with water, she rolls upsdie down and begins her descent. The water here is shallow, and a salvage team will be out for her in the morning. I smile a wicked smile to myself as I consider how little of her is left after those two torpedos shattered her hull!

More fire!? Spinning the parascope around, a British frigate has found it's way around me and is roaring through the waves towards me, dead to stern! This time, I do await the firing solution for tube 5, and fire my aft torpedo tube. Whomever was stearing the Frigate this morning must have been new, not a single evasive manuever, and U-43s 8th destoyed combat vessal this patrol bucks up at the bow from the exposion of our 5th launched torpedo, listing to port and sliding almost sideways through the waves,capsizing in the shallow waters behind me, just north of france.

Scanning the horizon in the poor dusk light with the observation parascope, I request depth under keel from my navigator and dive to 5m off the channel floor. I give the screw 3 hours of resting time before we reverse course back for Wilhelmshaven. We'd taken massive damage and were down to our last shot for each tube. I knew that Kreigsmarine HQ would not be pleased that I did not make my assigned patrol coordinate, but I'm certain that I will not be reprimanded too harshly. Eight English warships lay at the bottom of the ocean this morning thanks to this crew. I'll see to it personally that Chief Petty Officer Endeman recieved a commondation for his actions today.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Jazz-Man
03-19-2005, 06:11 AM
Borth from the SH3 campaign, all taken directly from the events of the mission. I've posted them at a couple of sites I frequent, thought I'd share them here. Might pull a few more of you who are wondering if the game is any good, or worth buying into the joy that is this game for me http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Both missions were run with "Event Camera" and "Scope stablization" as the only 'easy' settings I'm allowing myself http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> U-Boat, Type II
Designation U-2

Day 1, we setout this morning before sunrise from Wilhelmshaven for sector Alfa-November 81, assigned to patrol this sector for 24 hours. Running the diesal engines, we managed to reach AN81 in good time, and began our patrol, setting up an inward spiral from the NW corner and inward. No contacts were made our first day.

Day 2, the Kriegsmarine HQ authorized this patrol for 24 hours. We've yet to have made any contacts and I've held the ship in it's patrol. The men are getting restless and moral is low. I should hate to return to port without sinking atleast one British cargo ship, and I know that my men only want to see some action to boost their spirits.

Day 3, We've been on patrol for 36 hours now, and no contacts. My officers are exhausted, and we're operating on a skeleton crew right now so that when the time comes we will be ready. We've had to surface to recharge the batteries, and I've taken the first watch on the sail. It's dark now, but the sun should be up soon. Curse this rain! It hasn't let up since we reached the patrol sector.

Hour 42, Nearly 2 days into the patrol, almost twice the authorized patrol length, and no contacts reported by sonar or radar. A pair seamen have been given the last watch of the day before sun down, their officers need rest and we don't expect contacts before sun down, as sonar and radar have still reported nothing. Needing a breath of fresh air, I step out onto the sail and to my horror, a British warship is steaming right for us! Dashing below, I command the master engineer to dive the ship, emergency! ****! The water here is not deep enough, if that Destroyer gets any closer, we'll be dead. Where's my propulsion!!!

I can hear the engine crew scrambling to get the electric motor up and running, and the propellor whirls to life, only 2 knots... we'll never out run that warship at this speed. Make course for that ship! Weapons officer, get a crew into the forward torpedo room! SCHNELL!!!

My weapons officer stares at me as if I had been speaking Russian, in my impatience I slap him accross the face! "Get me a crew to the forward torpedo room now, or we're all dead!" the terror finally registers on his face and he scrambles off, pulling young sailors from their bunks as he runs toward the foward compartments.

I turn to the parascope, raising it as quickly as I can.. the British ship is closing on us quickly, headed right for us! I can see the British sailors on the deck, preparing the deck guns, and then the first muzzle flash lights up the dusk sky, "Incomming!!!!" I can see through my scope the round arcing up towards us and then sails harmlessly overhead, They missed! They missed!

Finally confirmation from my weapons officer, the torpedo room is manned. "Manuevering, make heading 032, propulsion, make turns for 5 knots! I've got to have 5 knots!" The next rounds were longer, it won't take the British long to realize we're headed right for them too, and I don't want to be anywhere near where they think I am.

Engine room to the bridge, we need more men down here!

"Schiesse!" and I turn to my navigator who's busy staring at his charts, awaiting my offer of a solution, "Get back to the engine room now, we don't have time for a firing solution!" and he takes off much faster than the weapons officer did!

Turning back to the parascope, "Enemy contact bearing 000, closing fast, it's not manuevering! Fire tube 1! Fire tube 2!" The torpedo tube doors creak open, it feels like hours before they finally clear the bays, everything is happening in slow motion now, the destroyer is only 100m away! Then suddenly the whooshing sound of compressed air and the high pitch squeel of a torpedo leaving the tube, then another, and now I wish only to be able to slow the world back down. The torpedos sucking the very sands of time through the hour glass, everything seemingly accelerating, my head reeling at the rapidity of it all as if God were standing behind me, "It's alright Captain, I'll make sure this is painless...." and then,

KABOOM

KABOOM

Two direct hits! The bow of the Frigate is lifted up out of the water, as the two enormous plumes of fire rip their way back into it's bridge, bucking the ship like a wild stallion, and slamming her into the heavy ocean waves, diving deep down below them, and I know she'll never recover. British sailors at the front of the boat were lucky, the explosions claimed them. The sailors on the stern, preparing to drop their depth charges on us were not so lucky, being thrown from the rear of the ship, up over the bridge and into the icy waves, like shot from a scatter gun. It's all sureal, I've never seen men die before, and I find myself unable to take my eyes off of the parascope. Now only 25m from the Frigate and alarms go off in my head, "Right full rudder! All back full!" the crew performs their duty perfectly, as our U-Boat banks sharply to the right, and the engine screams to pull us back away from the crashing frigate, no more than 10m in front of us. Closer and closer, the only thing left to do now is pray. There is nothing better or more than the crew can do now. As our boat wrenches itself around in the stormy ocean, the debris of the frigate scraping along the hull, the realization of what we've done begins to sweep over us. The whole ship, together, anticipates the collision, and as the last sounds of debris richochet off our hull and fade off into the icy atlantic waters, the crew erupts in cheers!

I slump the deck, exhausted but also very pleased. This was an untested vessal, and an untested crew. For forty two hours we had been onboard this vessal, now we were serving aboard her together, and for a few moments there in AN81, there were no officers and no enlistedmen, no arisocrats or factory workers, on board U-2, there was only a crew, and we'd survived... <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> My second patrol with the new Type VIIb Unterseebooten, U-43. I've had the shipyard outfit her with the 88mm deck gun as well as a single 20mm flak gun.

Setting out from Wilhelmshaven at 0400 hours, my ship has been assigned to patrol sector Bravo Foxtrot 56. Scanning over my map, I realize to my... I don't know, a dazzling combination of horror and amusement, that I will have to sail through the channel. The water is not deep there, and there is precious little ocean for a U-Boat to hide in, my only hope is to make the trip under the protection of dark.

Log Entry 2,

Two contacts spotted directly in front of me, approximately Alfa November 81. The weapons officer has identified them as armed trawlers of the British navy. Both ships are headed away from me at 5 knots. This new type VIII is much faster, I can easilly maintain 9 knots surfaced. From 5000m it is unlikely they've seen me yet in the pre-dawn light. I prepare my crew for combat and submerge to parascope depth when I''ve closed off 2000m of distance. I adeptly raise my parascope a fraction of a meter above the gentle swaying waves of the North Sea. The electric motor is performing wonderfully, 6 knots now underwater, I can still close with the two vessals. Now 1000m from the furthest target, I dip my parascope even lower, the waves cooperating as I find myself in a trough between the waves. I order my weapons officer to give me a solution. He does, and I go to the map table to check his work. Satisfied, I order torpedo door 3 opened. We've 2 electic torpedos loaded in tubes 3 and 4, and I don't want to alert the trawlers with the wake of the steam powered fish just yet. I lauch my first eel and dip my parascope under the water to see it flash from the tube and whir away in the dark waters. Raising the parascope again, I prepare to fire on the closer target. My weapons officer again gives me a solution, and again I go over it just in case. I don't yet trust Max's abilities to perform under pressure. My naval academy ring still imprinted in the side of his face from the last time...

Now only 550m away, I finalize the solution, open door 4, and fire my second torpedo of the patrol. Max and I check our stop watches, almost perfect, the two torpedos will arrive on target, if all goes well, within seconds of one another. His eyes meet mine, anticipating a kind look. He'll have his congradulations when the English are at the bottom of the sea!

Both torpedos running smoothly, both set to magnetic detonation at 4m depth. The trawlers draft 3.5m according to the latest papers,... we'll see how good our intelligence is...

500m in front of U-43, the second torpedo screams in underneathe propellor and rudder aseembly of the trawler, continues on for a fraction of a second and detonates perfectly, one half meter beneat the keel of the ship. The center of the trawler lifts up out of the water as the bridge is ripped in half. Explosions rock the two halves of the boat as unexpelled munitions are caught in the blast. The rear of the trawler completel disintigrates in front of my eyes and the bow bucks wildly backwards like an untamed horse, sinking rapidly. Before the more distant trawler can even react, my first torpedo catches it's propellor, totally destroying it's rudder and propulsion systems. Full reserves in the back of the boat produce a scope rattling explosion a few seconds later, and the second trawler, my first target, sinks slowly backwards into the black depths... The English should pay better attention.

Log Entry 3,

We've approached the narrows of the channel with almost perfect timing. Then sun has just begun dipping down beneath the horizon and it will be dark soon. I've been resting in my quarters when the watch officer bellows into the command station, "Three contacts, moving fast towards us, medium range!"

I kick my feet over the edge of my bed, not bothering to put my boots back on. As I run through the bow quarters, I drag our new deck gun specialist with me up to the bridge. ripping the binoculars from the hands of the WO, I quickly spot the 3 ships moving towards us. Grabbing the UZU I identify them as patrol boats. "Man the deck gun!" I scream forgetting that the gunner is not a meter behind me, "Well, get down there!" he hurries down to the gun, and I order the ship increased to flanking speed. If these boats wanted an easy target, they chose to attack the wrong boat! "Full left rudder, be quick on it! Deck gun, engage enemy ship bearing 002, fire at will! Target the waterline!" the first shells begin arcing away from my U-Boat and moments later we come into range of their light machineguns. The nearest English schnellboot isn't even manuevering. Calling for adjustments, I bring the arc of fire down slightly, and a round punctures the bow waterline of the first enemy vessal. At full speed, the ship floods itself at nearly 13 knots, water can't help but filly all front comparments, and the 3rd ship of this patrol piledrives itself *** over bow, down through the waves.

At this point, the deck gunner is automatic, his skill with the weapon is unquestionable as he makes short work of the other two patrol boats. Unfortunately, any jubilation is sort lived, as large calibre rounds begin splashing in the water around our ship. "Two destroyers, bearing 043, long range, 5500m!" and to my astonishment, the deck gunner swings his 88mm cannon around and begins firing shells. Even with all of my course reversals and at flanking speed, I can see explosiong lighting up the enemy ship, then, as another shell leaves our gun, a secondary explosion lights up the Dover cliffs in the distance. Another mutions explosion! The destroyer crippled, lists heavilly to port and disappears beneath the waves. Now 3000m from the 2nd destroyer, I order the ship to dive, "Up attack parascope! Arm tubes 1 and 2! Open doors 1 and 2! Weapons Officer, give me a solution!" I don't even wait for a reply, "Fire both tubes!" two steam powered torpedoes leave tubes 1 and 2 at high speed, set for a short range all out sprint. 2000m out, the destroyer begins a left hand turn and my heart sinks. Surely, our eels have missed! A few moments go by and then, to my astonishment, he rudders hard to starboard, right accross the path of my torpedos! There is still a chance! My greatest hopes are confirmed a few seconds later as my stopwatch reaches 0, first one, then a second massive explosion rock the British destoyer, pulling the mast of the ship down into the water on it's port side. As she fills with water, she rolls upsdie down and begins her descent. The water here is shallow, and a salvage team will be out for her in the morning. I smile a wicked smile to myself as I consider how little of her is left after those two torpedos shattered her hull!

More fire!? Spinning the parascope around, a British frigate has found it's way around me and is roaring through the waves towards me, dead to stern! This time, I do await the firing solution for tube 5, and fire my aft torpedo tube. Whomever was stearing the Frigate this morning must have been new, not a single evasive manuever, and U-43s 8th destoyed combat vessal this patrol bucks up at the bow from the exposion of our 5th launched torpedo, listing to port and sliding almost sideways through the waves,capsizing in the shallow waters behind me, just north of france.

Scanning the horizon in the poor dusk light with the observation parascope, I request depth under keel from my navigator and dive to 5m off the channel floor. I give the screw 3 hours of resting time before we reverse course back for Wilhelmshaven. We'd taken massive damage and were down to our last shot for each tube. I knew that Kreigsmarine HQ would not be pleased that I did not make my assigned patrol coordinate, but I'm certain that I will not be reprimanded too harshly. Eight English warships lay at the bottom of the ocean this morning thanks to this crew. I'll see to it personally that Chief Petty Officer Endeman recieved a commondation for his actions today.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

MouseNo47
03-19-2005, 06:45 AM
Very nice, very nice indeed.

Tomcat41
03-19-2005, 06:59 AM
"everything is happening in slow motion now, the destroyer is only 100m away!"

impossible http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif u said ur torpedos exploded and torpedoes require about 300 meters distance at least to arm themselves otherwise they wont work http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif