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View Full Version : Any Luftwaffe missions worthy of being committed to celluloid like the Dambusters?



Low_Flyer_MkVb
09-03-2006, 11:37 AM
Keep it civil. I'm genuinely interested.

p1ngu666
09-03-2006, 11:44 AM
maybe supplying stalingrad, boddenplatt?

p1ngu666
09-03-2006, 11:45 AM
oh, and kg200 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

dieg777
09-03-2006, 11:48 AM
Id say operation bodenplatte- a last ditch attempt to destroy the allied airforce on the ground.

there would be interesting tension between galland who has carefuly built up a reserve to use in one big push against the daylight bomber raids and the luftwaffe high command and the angst as the reserve and many others were wasted in the futile mission. many pilots were shot down by their own sides flak, many crashed due to poor weather of were killed by flak.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Bodenplatte


gosh- pingu is quick- in as I typed this

DuxCorvan
09-03-2006, 11:48 AM
How about that nazi gal, who was ordered to take D├┬Ânitz to the bunker, and then taking him back to his post, in the middle of Berlin Battle? She even tried to lead a nazi 'kamikaze' squadron of modified, piloted V-1s. She was a mad nazi and all, but she was skilled and brave. They could make some docudrama approach about the facts, leaving ideologies apart, this is, some kind of 'Untergang' with planes.

We have also the rescue of Mussolini in a Storch...

Or the deeds of Jagdverband 44...

There are interesting stories, though some of them may be a bit delicate from a PC point of view.

DmdSeeker
09-03-2006, 11:51 AM
The taking of Eben Em├┬Žl (sp?); the huge Belgian fort was a commando raid on an heroic level; as was the rescue of Mussolini.

Both operations were glider launched; so do they count?

p1ngu666
09-03-2006, 12:04 PM
yep, i forgot about that belgian fort.

theres still storches about, for the mussolini rescue http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

cawimmer430
09-03-2006, 12:10 PM
Originally posted by DuxCorvan:
How about that nazi gal, who was ordered to take D├┬Ânitz to the bunker, and then taking him back to his post, in the middle of Berlin Battle? She even tried to lead a nazi 'kamikaze' squadron of modified, piloted V-1s. She was a mad nazi and all, but she was skilled and brave. They could make some docudrama approach about the facts, leaving ideologies apart, this is, some kind of 'Untergang' with planes.

We have also the rescue of Mussolini in a Storch...

Or the deeds of Jagdverband 44...

There are interesting stories, though some of them may be a bit delicate from a PC point of view.

Hanna Reitsch

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanna_Reitsch

stathem
09-03-2006, 12:15 PM
You beat me to it, Christian.

Before they took of from Templehof (I think it was) in the Storch, she and Von Griem had been flown in in a FW190. She was stuffed into the glove box, being only 3" high. They lost several of the escorting FW's to Russian fighters.

AWL_Spinner
09-03-2006, 12:15 PM
s'funny, I was thinking that just the other day. I guess to measure up to the dams raid certain criteria must be met and these (at first thought) would include:

o Small numbers (squadron strength or lower)
o Unusual or unique weapons or weapon delivery profiles unused elsewhere in the war requiring specialist planning and training
o single or multiple precision targets either extremely well defended or normally inaccesible/outside of normal operational areas.

If they'd actually done it, something like the planned Japanese submarine-launched seaplane attack on the gates of the Panama canal would fit the bill. I'm sure there are examples of actual operations from the German side.

Interesting topic.

JG52Uther
09-03-2006, 12:30 PM
The low level Do17 raid on Kenley? in 1940.I love that one. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

cawimmer430
09-03-2006, 12:36 PM
Originally posted by stathem:
You beat me to it, Christian.

German Efficiency http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

PraetorHonoris
09-03-2006, 12:44 PM
A lot of Missions...

April 9 1940: 6 Me110 are to cover a paratrooper landing on airfield Fornebue near Oslo and land on the airfield once conquered. Due to timing problems, the paratroopers came to late and the Me110 landed without their support conquering the airfield by themselves with the help of the gunners' MGs.

May 1941: Crete. 15000 Paratroopers shall land and secure airfield for further reenforcements of 14000 Mountain troops. But the plan was known to the British and they had tanks, so many paratroopers were killed in the air. However, they managed to overcome the 40000 enemies and clear the way for the Mountain troops.

January 21 1942: Theo Blaich attacks Fort Lamy, which was supposed to be out of range. The German bombers indeed lacked the range, so they landed inmidst of the desert. A Ju52 pilots starts without permission to rescue them and succeeds.

and so on and so on...

Sharpe26
09-03-2006, 01:03 PM
already on celluloid, the two 190's strafing the invasion beaches.

I have to agree with the Bodenplatte missions. Although I do think that a movie about Schweinfurt from both the American and the German perspective will also be interesting.

edit: that's it! what about a series of three movies?

1: Schweinfurt

2: Big B (AKA Berlin)

3: Bodenplatte

AWL_Spinner
09-03-2006, 01:12 PM
You could certainly make some pretty gritty movies about the operations against impossible odds in the latter months of the war.

As usual however (well, to us in the west) I'm sure there's a whole LOAD of stuff we don't know about Luftwaffe operations on the Eastern Front.

fighter_966
09-03-2006, 02:03 PM
Story of for example Marseille or someone other of their aces

Klemm.co
09-03-2006, 02:12 PM
Originally posted by Sharpe26:
Already on celluloid, the two 190's strafing the invasion beaches.


What is the name of this celluloid (movie)?

reisen52
09-03-2006, 02:18 PM
Originally posted by Klemm.co:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Sharpe26:
Already on celluloid, the two 190's strafing the invasion beaches.


What is the name of this celluloid (movie)? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The Longest Day

Haigotron
09-03-2006, 02:27 PM
I forgot the name of the operation where Galland had to organize the umbrella protection of the two destroyers through the english channel, i couldnt believe when i read it the first time in his book, sounded almost like a movie..

HuninMunin
09-03-2006, 02:32 PM
Operation Cerberus

orkan_3d
09-03-2006, 03:38 PM
Story of for example Marseille or someone other of their aces

There is some french movie, probably TV production, not historical, but vagly conected to Marseille. About nazi pilot meets Hitler for the first time and realizing H madnes. He returns to front and dies on first mision. With unavoidable romantic story. At the end there is a text conecting story to Marseille.

MM-Zorin
09-03-2006, 04:01 PM
As long as it won't be a US production it will be fine with me. Couldn't stand another stereotype nazi action US saved the world blockbuster... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

Vike
09-03-2006, 04:31 PM
I think i have what you search Low_Flyer_MkVb http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif:

German Raid on Bari,dubbed "The Second Pearl Harbor",the 2nd December 1943:

<<On the afternoon of December 2, 1943, 1st Lt. Werner Hahn piloted his <span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Messerschmitt Me-210 reconnaissance plane</span> over the port of Bari, in southeastern Italy. Cruising at 23,000 feet, his aircraft made a telltale contrail as he streaked across the sky, but Allied anti-aircraft crews took little notice. Still unmolested, the German pilot made a second pass over the city before turning north toward home. If Hahn's report was promising, the Luftwaffe would launch a major airstrike against the port.

(...)

As 1943 drew to a close, Bari's medieval torpor and somnolent grace were shaken off by the influx of Allied shipping into its harbor.<span class="ev_code_yellow"> Tons of supplies were offloaded almost around the clock, transforming the once quiet town into a hive of activity. On December 2, at least 30 Allied ships were crowded into the harbor, packed so tightly they almost touched.</span>

The port was under the jurisdiction of the British, in part because Bari was the main supply base for General Bernard Law Montgomery's Eighth Army. <span class="ev_code_yellow">But the city was also the newly designated headquarters of the American Fifteenth Air Force, which had been activated in November of that year.</span> The Fifteenth's primary mission was to bomb targets in the Balkans, Italy and especially Germany. <span class="ev_code_yellow">Fifteenth Air Force commander Maj. Gen. James H. "Jimmy" Doolittle had arrived in Bari on December 1.</span>

(...)

Responding to rumblings about lax security measures, British Air Vice Marshal Sir Arthur Coningham <span class="ev_code_YELLOW">held a press conference on the afternoon of December 2 and assured reporters that the Luftwaffe was defeated in Italy.</span> He was confident the Germans would never attack Bari. "I would regard it as a personal affront and insult," the air marshal haughtily declared, "if the Luftwaffe would attempt any significant action in this area."

(...)

When the strike force was mustered, <span class="ev_code_yellow">there were only 105 Ju-88s available for the mission.</span> But the element of surprise, coupled with an attack at dusk, might shift the odds in the Germans' favor.<span class="ev_code_YELLOW"> Most of the planes would come from Italy, but Richthofen purposely wanted to obfuscate matters by using a few Ju-88s from Yugoslavia. If the Allies thought the entire mission originated from there, they just might misdirect retaliatory strikes to the Balkans.</span>
The Ju-88 pilots were ordered to fly their twin-engine bombers east to the Adriatic, then swing south and west. British anti-aircraft would probably expect an attack--if any--to come from the north, not from the west.<span class="ev_code_YELLOW"> The Ju-88s were also supplied with Duppel,</span> thin strips of tinfoil cut to various lengths. The tinfoil registered like aircraft on radar screens, producing scores of phantom targets.

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">The German raid began at 7:30 p.m. and ended 20 minutes later.</span> German losses were very light, and they had succeeded beyond their most sanguine expectations. Seventeen Allied ships were sunk and another eight were damaged, causing Bari to be dubbed the "second Pearl Harbor." The Americans sustained the highest losses, losing the Liberty ships John Bascom, John L. Motley, Joseph Wheeler, Samuel J. Tilden and John Harvey. The British lost four ships, the Italians three, the Norwegians three and the Poles two.

The next morning survivors woke to a scene of utter devastation. Large parts of Bari had been reduced to rubble, particularly the medieval old town. Portions of the city and the harbor were still burning, and a thick pall of black smoke hung in the sky. There were more than 1,000 military and merchant marine casualties; about 800 were admitted to local hospitals. The full extent of civilian casualties may never be known. Conservative estimates hover around 1,000, though there were probably more.

Fortunately, Bari was the site of several Allied military hospitals and related support facilities. Some were housed at the Bari Polyclinic, built by Mussolini as a showcase of Fascist health care. The Polyclinic was home to the 98th British General Hospital and the 3rd New Zealand Hospital, among others. Those facilities received many of the mustard gas victims that began to appear.

Casualties from the raid began pouring in until the hospitals were filled to overflowing. Almost immediately some of the wounded began to complain of "gritty" eyes, and their condition worsened in spite of conventional treatment. Their eyes were swollen, and skin lesions began to appear. Swamped with wounded of all descriptions and still not realizing they were dealing with poison gas, hospital staffers allowed victims to remain in their oil-and-gas-soaked clothes for long periods.

Not only were the victims severely burned and blistered from prolonged exposure, but their respiratory systems were also badly irritated. The mustard gas casualties were wracked with coughs and had real difficulty breathing, but the hospital staff seemed helpless in the face of this unknown ailment. Men started to die, and even those who did recover faced a long and painful convalescence. Temporary blindness, the agony of burns and a terrible swelling of the genitals produced both physical and mental anguish.

As the victims began to die, the doctors started to suspect that some kind of chemical agent was involved. Some physicians pointed fingers at the Germans, speculating that they had resorted to chemical warfare after all. A message was sent to Allied headquarters in Algiers informing Deputy Surgeon General Fred Blesse that patients were dying of a "mysterious malady." To solve the mystery, Blesse dispatched Lt. Col. Stewart Francis Alexander, an expert on chemical warfare medicine, to Bari.

Alexander examined the patients and interviewed them when appropriate. It was beginning to look like mustard gas exposure, but the doctor was not sure. His suspicions were confirmed when a bomb-casing fragment was recovered from the bottom of the harbor. <span class="ev_code_YELLOW">The fragment was identified as an American M47A1 bomb,</span> which was designated for possible delivery of mustard gas. The Germans could be eliminated as suspects; in this case, the Allies were to blame. >>

All the story here (http://www.historynet.com/magazines/world_war_2/3027436.html)

http://ahoy.tk-jk.net/ImagesMarch52006/FlightGermanJU88s.jpg http://ahoy.tk-jk.net/ImagesMarch52006/BurningAtBari.jpg

http://ahoy.tk-jk.net/ImagesMarch52006/GermanJU88.jpg http://ahoy.tk-jk.net/ImagesMarch52006/BariShipsBurning.jpg

Some more details here. (http://ahoy.tk-jk.net/macslog/SlaughteratBariSouthernIt.html)

An enORmous day of defeat,at a time where allied High Command talked about Luftwaffe "weakness"... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

@+

joeap
09-03-2006, 04:40 PM
Originally posted by Haigotron:
I forgot the name of the operation where Galland had to organize the umbrella protection of the two destroyers through the english channel, i couldnt believe when i read it the first time in his book, sounded almost like a movie..

Two battlecruisers, and one heavy cruiser actually. Destroyers and smaller ships too.

PraetorHonoris
09-03-2006, 04:47 PM
There is a movie about Hans Joachim Marseille in the Luftwaffe, beginning with his pilot's training and ending with his death. Despite it's age it is very good.

"Der Stern von Afrika" with Joachim Hansen and Marianne Koch.

http://img111.imageshack.us/img111/1525/b00000jpgs01lzzzzzzzto0.jpg

FoolTrottel
09-03-2006, 05:08 PM
For a true challenge:

"Die Katastrophe von Neuhammer"

You'll need to add some pretty neat romance thing to it to draw attention from any mass audience, and do some re-writing of history...

On the other hand, picture yerself as being a pilot there.... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Sergio_101
09-03-2006, 05:50 PM
I would love to see Bodenplatte on film.
Especially the attack and defense at Y-29. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

Sergio

Taylortony
09-03-2006, 06:17 PM
I have one that would make a story, one mans actions that saved a whole squadron and an airfield......... was using the cannon on his henschel as he rolled down the field, him and his trust mechanic, as he ran out of ammo he landed and got in another and so it went on.......... will photo the article and put up here it is a cracking read

jensenpark
09-03-2006, 07:18 PM
Interesting question...and a good one.

On the allied side, there are some really great unique ones:
dambusters of course
doolittle raid
the mosquito raid on the Amiens Gestapo prison
Tirpitz raid

I mean, the 617 Squadron alone could keep Hollywood busy for a while with their exploits.

Don't know if the great ones from Germany and USSR are lost, never happened to the scale of the famous Allied ones, or just not publicized.

Mussolini's rescue is certainly worthy, though not as much a luftwaffle mission...

Will continue look forward to everyone's comments.

CUJO_1970
09-03-2006, 07:46 PM
Schweinfurt, Regensburg - "Black Thursday".

The big "Buffalo" killers the like Georg Eder, Tony Hackl etc etc.

A number of LW super aces would make interesting movies -

Marseille
Hartman
Galland
Rall

etc etc etc

MrMojok
09-03-2006, 07:48 PM
A modern update of the Marseilles story, could be very very good, if done right.

JG53Frankyboy
09-03-2006, 07:51 PM
actually every sortie could be used......... for me this "Dambuster" mission has nothing special - just a good flown mission.
like lot more on every side.
men are doing their duty as good as they can.

there is just a film around about it - thats the main difference.

Feathered_IV
09-03-2006, 10:26 PM
+1 for Bodenplatte

That whole operation makes a good showcase for the waste and stupidity of war.

panther3485
09-04-2006, 12:50 AM
In terms of the bravery of the pilots/crews, the daring and/or unusual nature of the mission etc, there is no shortage of choices avaialble - plenty of Luftwaffe material to work from, I should think.

Whether that's the question, or not, is another question entirely!


Best regards to all, http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
panther3485

DmdSeeker
09-04-2006, 01:00 AM
I'd like to know more about that raid on Bari; if I understand the above post correctly it's implying that some of the supply ships were frieghting mustard gas shells; and I didn't know that that had been used in WWII.

ColoradoBBQ
09-04-2006, 01:46 AM
Originally posted by DmdSeeker:
I'd like to know more about that raid on Bari; if I understand the above post correctly it's implying that some of the supply ships were frieghting mustard gas shells; and I didn't know that that had been used in WWII.

They were shipped in case Germany starts using gas warfare tactics but Germany didn't so those warheads weren't used.

DoubleTap2005A
09-04-2006, 06:54 AM
Originally posted by MM-Zorin:
As long as it won't be a US production it will be fine with me. Couldn't stand another stereotype nazi action US saved the world blockbuster... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

You know of any good "US saved the world blockbuster" movies? I'd like to rent a few from Netflix...

Vike
09-04-2006, 06:56 AM
Originally posted by ColoradoBBQ:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by DmdSeeker:
I'd like to know more about that raid on Bari; if I understand the above post correctly it's implying that some of the supply ships were frieghting mustard gas shells; and I didn't know that that had been used in WWII.

They were shipped in case Germany starts using gas warfare tactics but Germany didn't so those warheads weren't used. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Exaclty http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Anyway,the story of German Raid on Bari deserves to be more known,as it had a very spectacular scenario,with some astonishing events.
Those american gas bombs behaved like boomerangs,though they were not in use. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

<<Secrecy still dogged the whole affair, however. Eventually, the British and American people were told of the devastating Bari raid, but the part played by mustard gas was kept from them. <span class="ev_code_yellow">British Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill was particularly adamant that this aspect of the tragedy remain a secret. It was embarrassing enough that the raid occurred at a port under British jurisdiction. Churchill believed that publicizing the fiasco would hand the Germans a propaganda coup.</span>>>

(from the first link i posted above)

This *Secrecy* killed many allied soldiers that day...As Bari doctors didn't know what was this *mysterious* disease that killed so badly http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

@+

ps:

Note that this story implies some famous names from both side,like :

Richthofen (cousin of the Famous Ace of WW-1)
Doolittle
Montgomery
Churchill
(...)

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

Surely,there will be a "hollywood" film on that Historical fact,but when? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

AWL_Spinner
09-04-2006, 07:46 AM
actually every sortie could be used......... for me this "Dambuster" mission has nothing special - just a good flown mission.
like lot more on every side. men are doing their duty as good as they can.

Sorry, I disagree totally. This thread is supposed to be about highlighting other uniquely challenging or exceptional missions from any side, not trying to belittle the dams raid which was exceptional in most regards!

Kurfurst__
09-04-2006, 08:14 AM
Crete would be a great one imho, or Bodenplatte.

Eastern Front has tons of great stories, fighter pilots landing in their 109/190s behind enemy lines to rescue their shot down college from captivity, then there is the blow to the 8th AF shuttle missions in 1944, but the problem with the EF is that it's quite difficult to create a romantic line for GF/Wife. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

BTW Hanna Reitsch's life story in it's own would make a huge basis for a film, except she is quite politically incorrect (being a fanatic supporter of Hitler until last). Too bad, given her great character..

ploughman
09-04-2006, 08:34 AM
Crete would be a blinder.

A film about the Malta Convoys from all sides would be very interesting, maybe focusing on the Ohio.

NagaSadow84
09-04-2006, 08:46 AM
Not Luftwaffe, but it would be perfect for a movie:

The Brandenburger-Commando-Raid on Maikop

Considering all their accomplishments, it would be difficult to declare one mission more impressive than another, but there was one occasion when the Brandenburgers seemed to outdo even themselves. In early August 1941, a Brandenburg detachment of 62 Baltic and Sudeten Germans led by Baron Adrian von F├┬Âlkersam penetrated farther into enemy territory than any other Brandenburg unit. Nicknamed "the wild bunch," they undertook to secure the oil fields at Maikop. Using Red Army trucks and the uniforms of the NKVD, the Russian secret police, F├┬Âlkersam infiltrated the Soviet lines. The Brandenburgers immediately ran into a large group of Red Army deserters, and F├┬Âlkersam saw an opportunity to use them. By persuading them to return to the Soviet cause, he was able to join with them and move almost at will through the Russian lines.
Pretending to be a Major Truchin from Stalingrad, F├┬Âlkersam explained his role in recovering the deserters to the general in charge of Maikop's defenses. The Russian general believed F├┬Âlkersam and gave him a personal tour of the city's defenses the next day. By August 8, the German army was only 12 miles away, so the Brandenburgers made their move. Using grenades to simulate an artillery attack, the Brandenburgers knocked out the communications center of the city. F├┬Âlkersam then went to the Russian defenders and told them that a withdrawal was taking place. Having seen F├┬Âlkersam with their commander and lacking any communications to rebut or confirm his statement, the Soviets began to evacuate Maikop. The German army entered the city without a fight on August 9, 1942.

slipBall
09-04-2006, 08:50 AM
The crossing at Meuse - 13th of May 1940,
120 Stukas were devided into three sections (40 airplanes/section).
At 7:00 hours Do-17 medium bombers attacked the defensive positions, followed by artillery fire observed from a "Fieseler Storch" artillery reconaissannce aircraft that was covered/escorted by a fighter support consisting of 80x "Me Bf-109s".
At 12:00 hours the first section with Stukas attacked in waves of 2-3 airplanes at the time.
The 2:nd section at an altitude of 12.000 feet looking for missed targets and attacking them.
The 3:rd section operated isolated from the other two sections, picking out single and moving targets.
At 15:00 hours, Do-17s and Ju-87s under protection from fighters, performed coordinated attacks together with artillery.

or
maybe something to do with Rudel

The most famous Stuka ace must be Hans Ulrich Rudel that usually flew the Junkers Ju-87G-2 "Kanonenvogel". Rudel flew 2530 combat missions, and was granted almost no leave throughout his four years of active duty.

He was shot down 32 times with and many aircraft were brought back to base that were later written off, due to heavy combat damage. Rudel became wounded on many occasions, including the partial amputation of his right leg in the Spring of 1945, after which he continued to fly with a prosthetic limb. His most famous achivement occured in March 44. Rudel had landed behind Soviet lines to retrieve a downed German aircrew, but snow and mud bogged down the airplane - making it impossible to take off. Approaching Soviet troops forced them, to set the aircraft on fire and flee on foot. Barring their escape was the wide river of "Dnjestr". The Germans stripped to their longjohns, and swam across the ice-clogged river. Rudel's close friend and crewman, Erwin Henstchel, drowned a few meters from the far shore.

Rudel continued and were pursued by hundreds of Soviet troops, all intent on collecting the 100 000 ruble bounty which Stalin himself had placed on his head. During the escape Rudel became hit in the shoulder by a bullet as the Soviet soldiers chased him with dogs and from horsebacks. Through incredible ingenuity, audacity, and raw determination, Rudel escaped and made his way, alone but alive, back home, despite being more than 30 miles behind Soviet lines when he began his 24 hour trek. He was barefoot and almost naked in the sub-freezing winter weather, without food, compass, or medical attention.

All of Rudel's personal victories as a ground-attack pilot were achieved exclusively against the Soviets, operating under primitive condition. His confirmed victories (those witnessed by two or more fellow pilots) include: 518+ Tanks, 700 Trucks, 150+ Flak and Artillery positions, 9 Fighter/Ground Attack Aircrafts, the battleship "October Revolution", the cruiser "Marat", and 70 landing crafts, and additional hundreds of bridges, railway lines, bunkers, etc.

The 1st of January, 1945 Rudel was rewarded with the "Knight's Cross with Golden Oakleaves, Swords & Diamonds". Note that the Golden Oakleaves were awarded once during the entire war.

ploughman
09-04-2006, 08:56 AM
Nice to see Rudel died an old man.

csThor
09-04-2006, 09:01 AM
Rudel falls in the same category as Hanna Reitsch - a die-hard Nazi until the end. He was in fact very active in post-war Germany supporting various right-wing organizations. IIRC he was brought before various courts.

ploughman
09-04-2006, 09:04 AM
Maybe not then.

slipBall
09-04-2006, 09:26 AM
The Rudel story is quite amazing, and would make a great film. I was un-aware that he was politically active with Nazi beliefs

mandrill7
09-04-2006, 09:45 AM
IIRC there was an interesting and succesful LW raid on the Allied shipping off the Anzio Beachhead using the cutting edge "Fritz-X" guided missile system and a small # of He-177's flown from Southern France. Forget exactly what damage was done, but I think some allied warships were sunk and the fleet was forced to stand-off the beachhead at a considerable distance.

You could do a similar type of screenplay to the "Dambusters". Spotlight the hard-working German scientist designing the weapon system. If you were really lucky, he might even be an anti-Nazi with qualms about the War. Add in a hard-bitten Luftwaffe Staffel-Kapitan who has an interesting personal history. And you would - of course - need him to have a pet black dog called "Neger".

ploughman
09-04-2006, 09:47 AM
Warspite had her bottom blown out by that one. She refused to sink, being bloody minded, and was repaired using concrete. Didn't the same weapon destroy a pair of Italian battleships though?

csThor
09-04-2006, 09:48 AM
Rudel was the only receipient of the Knight's Cross with Golden Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds. Should tell you something about his beliefs since that late in the war new awards weren't created for bravery alone http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

The mentioned Golden Oak Leaves was pretty much a political award, meant for those who were "110 percenters" http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

WOLFMondo
09-04-2006, 10:21 AM
Originally posted by slipBall:
The Rudel story is quite amazing, and would make a great film. I was un-aware that he was politically active with Nazi beliefs

He was like Wittman tha famous tank commander, would make a great film but a total brown shirt wearing die hard Nazi.

Could probably make a film about Galland. He wasn't a Nazi and led an interesting life.

Kernow
09-04-2006, 10:32 AM
Originally posted by Ploughman:
Warspite had her bottom blown out by that one. She refused to sink, being bloody minded, and was repaired using concrete. Didn't the same weapon destroy a pair of Italian battleships though?

Ah you've got it! Most other suggestions seem to fall into the 'good war-film' ideas category, rather than 'something like the dambusters,' but the sinking of the 2 Italian battleships as they sailed to surrender to the allies, IIRC, would pretty much exactly match dams raid - unique and special weapon, specially trained crews, a specific important target, small unit etc... although the weapons were used several times, they were never exactly common.

stathem
09-04-2006, 10:32 AM
Originally posted by mandrill7:
IIRC there was an interesting and succesful LW raid on the Allied shipping off the Anzio Beachhead using the cutting edge "Fritz-X" guided missile system and a small # of He-177's flown from Southern France. Forget exactly what damage was done, but I think some allied warships were sunk and the fleet was forced to stand-off the beachhead at a considerable distance.

You could do a similar type of screenplay to the "Dambusters". Spotlight the hard-working German scientist designing the weapon system. If you were really lucky, he might even be an anti-Nazi with qualms about the War. Add in a hard-bitten Luftwaffe Staffel-Kapitan who has an interesting personal history. And you would - of course - need him to have a pet black dog called "Neger".

Even better, the first batch to be used in combat failed miserably. After a thorough 'investigation', it was found that some brave sabotuer had been cutting some circuit wires inside the weapons.

Low_Flyer_MkVb
09-04-2006, 12:13 PM
Thanks to all for the replies.

In agreement with much of what has been posted. Crete would make a spectacular, great movie, as would 'Cerberus' (could even get Whirlies and Swordfish into that one) - love the accounts of things getting so confusing for the British that the RAF was attacking RN ships while the Luftwaffe escorted them, a truly great British balls-up. Taking nothing away from the audacity and planning of the Germans.

Hanna Reitsch - what a great biopic that would make, even with her political affiliations. I'd like to think that any target audience would be mature enough to handle things.

And a great write up from Vike - the Bari raid would be a good way to show what happens in war.

Haigotron
09-04-2006, 01:19 PM
Operation Cerberus

YES! thank you! that's definitely the one


quote:
Originally posted by Haigotron:
I forgot the name of the operation where Galland had to organize the umbrella protection of the two destroyers through the english channel, i couldnt believe when i read it the first time in his book, sounded almost like a movie..


Two battlecruisers, and one heavy cruiser actually. Destroyers and smaller ships too.

True again my mind was elsewhere when i wrote it http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

but i have the agree that the channel dash, written in Galland's book, seemed like such a thrilling experience...

bienenbaer
09-04-2006, 02:17 PM
Both books by Johannes Steinhoff

Die Strasse von Messina (The straits of Messina: Diary of a fighter commander)
In letzter Stunde (The Final Hours: The Luftwaffe Plot Against G├┬Âring)

are almost perfect templates for a story-book, somewhat dramatized for a movie, just as they are for a TV-mini series

Note 1: Some of his old JG52 comrades (see their web-site) seem to think he already sacrificed history for the sake of his story
Note 2: As german of today I am politically not interested in any glorification of the Wehrmacht or its missions, especially for a larger audience.

leitmotiv
09-05-2006, 03:59 AM
The Germans could do a completely hero-worshipping film about their night fighter pilots without enraging the hackles of the PC police since they were, after all, defending the cities from incendiaries. They beat Bomber Command in the hard fought Battle of Berlin in the fall/winter of 1943-44, and were still inflicting periodic drubbings almost to the end. Was a fascinating story.

AWL_Spinner
09-05-2006, 04:12 AM
The Germans could do a completely hero-worshipping film about their night fighter pilots without enraging the hackles of the PC police since they were, after all, defending the cities from incendiaries.

Oh I dunno, you can enrage the PC police with pretty much anything http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

However, not sure that would make a particularly great movie as it was more "fish in a barrel" than "against all odds" with the technology available in 44-45.

LW pilots against the huge daytime formations probably more of a story.

whiteladder
09-05-2006, 05:00 AM
Ok this plan was never put into action, but with a bit of dramatic license(which most war film have) would make a good film.

The German plan to blow up the locks on the Panama canal using Skukas that had been transported on U boats in special containers. The plan got as far as the aircrews training on mock up targets and the U boat crew learning how to assemeble the aircraft.

Could make a good thriller.

berg417448
09-05-2006, 08:09 AM
Originally posted by whiteladder:
Ok this plan was never put into action, but with a bit of dramatic license(which most war film have) would make a good film.

The German plan to blow up the locks on the Panama canal using Skukas that had been transported on U boats in special containers. The plan got as far as the aircrews training on mock up targets and the U boat crew learning how to assemeble the aircraft.

Could make a good thriller.


The Japanese actually had a plan to do that as well.
http://www.pacificwrecks.com/reviews/i-400.html

dadada1
09-05-2006, 08:29 AM
Like most here it's pilot stories that seem to be the best material for film. I'd nominate "The Blonde Knight of Germany" and " I Flew For the Fuhrer". Both have a good mix of combat action and the more personal/human stories. As long as Hollywood had nothing to do with these they'd be good subjects.

panther3485
09-05-2006, 08:43 AM
Originally posted by dadada1:
Like most here it's pilot stories that seem to be the best material for film. I'd nominate "The Blonde Knight of Germany" and " I Flew For the Fuhrer". Both have a good mix of combat action and the more personal/human stories. As long as Hollywood had nothing to do with these they'd be good subjects.

'I Flew For The Fuhrer', the story of Heinz Knocke, would definitely get my vote! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif
(Nothing like 'The Dambusters' but I still reckon it would make excellent material for a movie!)

Capt._Tenneal
09-05-2006, 09:02 AM
Someone mentioned it in passing, but the Luftwaffe raid on the shuttle base in the Eastern front where they caught a lot of B-17s on the ground.

Agree on the Hanna Reitsch. They could get the actress who played her in Downfall. For a die-hard Nazi character, she was hot. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif

Kurfurst__
09-05-2006, 10:20 AM
Hmmm... Hartmann's story would be perfect, it has everything that is needed for a movie.. youngster taken from his g/f in the midst of war, making some stupid things in his early carreer, becoming a legend, a daring escape from behind Russian lines, his friendship with his mechanic, luv story for the girls, his hard time in Soviet prison camps, and finally reuniting with his loved ones. Oh, and lots of 109s!

And he's politically correct, too. Maybe Miss Reitsch and Herr Rudel can make a cameo, too. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Orlando Bloom playing Hartmann, little blonde dye and a pair of blue contact lense, LOL. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif