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gpang788
12-13-2007, 04:18 AM
Seen lots of cockpit photos of WW2 fighters.

Very puzzled as to how they navigate? Is it mostly via dead reckoning, or via some other means? If so , can u employ the same nav methods in PF?

gpang788
12-13-2007, 04:18 AM
Seen lots of cockpit photos of WW2 fighters.

Very puzzled as to how they navigate? Is it mostly via dead reckoning, or via some other means? If so , can u employ the same nav methods in PF?

STENKA_69.GIAP
12-13-2007, 05:43 AM
You will almost certainly find a compass and a clock in any of the cockpits. A map will be carried folded to show the area to be covered, marked up with the planned route. On a paper or pad clipped to the back of the folded map will be notes giving the waypoints, bearings and times.

Natural features such as landmarks, rivers, roads, railways, coastline will be followed or set as waypoints. For example if your destination is near a river you set a course that is sure to intersect the river then follow river to destination.

If there are no landmarks eg. Blue sea then you must take bearing, time and airspeed (converted to groundspeed depending on altitute) and apply dead rekoning adjusting cap and time for windspeed/direction.

In game it's easier than in real as you don't have to deal with windspeed/direction changes during the flight.

All of this you can apply in game.

Radio beacons were used in WW2 to follow to target, return to carrier or to triangulate your position. This is in a way reflected in game in that you can request a vector to home from ground control.

If you click on my badge it will take you to the GIAP website - look in training section and you will find a navigation training pack including land and blue water navigation exercises.

Skoshi Tiger
12-13-2007, 06:07 AM
I've got an old propaganda film called "fight for the skies" on video.

Its about the fighter pilots escorting the bombers on the daylight raids. they were all writing their Headings, speeds and times on the back of thier hands (So they wouldn't loose them!)

The last thing they had to do before they crashed was lick it off, so the Germans couldn't find out where their raid was going!( Hmmm!)

I guess they had it a bit easy, They did have huge formations of bombers to follow!

Skunk_438RCAF
12-13-2007, 06:26 AM
I posted this a little while ago:
http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/23110283/m/371...021019606#8021019606 (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/23110283/m/3711068606?r=8021019606#8021019606)

Zeus-cat
12-13-2007, 03:38 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">The last thing they had to do before they crashed was lick it off, so the Germans couldn't find out where their raid was going!( Hmmm!) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Someone who only flew a desk thought that up!!!

gedunkman
12-13-2007, 04:25 PM
S~gpang788
I cannot recommend this virtual IL2 instruction school enough!! You will learn and fly all things navigation and then some. Go here:
http://www.joint-ops.com

S`

gedunkman

MB_Avro_UK
12-13-2007, 05:24 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by STENKA_69.GIAP:
You will almost certainly find a compass and a clock in any of the cockpits. A map will be carried folded to show the area to be covered, marked up with the planned route. On a paper or pad clipped to the back of the folded map will be notes giving the waypoints, bearings and times.

Natural features such as landmarks, rivers, roads, railways, coastline will be followed or set as waypoints. For example if your destination is near a river you set a course that is sure to intersect the river then follow river to destination.

If there are no landmarks eg. Blue sea then you must take bearing, time and airspeed (converted to groundspeed depending on altitute) and apply dead rekoning adjusting cap and time for windspeed/direction.

In game it's easier than in real as you don't have to deal with windspeed/direction changes during the flight.

All of this you can apply in game.

Radio beacons were used in WW2 to follow to target, return to carrier or to triangulate your position. This is in a way reflected in game in that you can request a vector to home from ground control.

If you click on my badge it will take you to the GIAP website - look in training section and you will find a navigation training pack including land and blue water navigation exercises. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

Wind direction and speed is not modelled in il2. The effect of wind is a major factor in navigation and is not constant in real life.

Pilots/Navigators were given the estimated wind strength and direction before take off and incorporated it into their navigational calculations.

Not a big problem if you have sight of the ground but if at night and flying in cloud you could miss your waypoint/target by a large margin as wind strength and direction always varies throughout the flight.

If you are only one degree off in your heading after 60 miles you will miss your waypoint/target by one mile.(Known as the 'one in sixty rule').

Best Regards,
MB_Avro.

Loco-S
12-13-2007, 06:06 PM
you can always deduct the wind direction and speed while checking for waypoints, the good old E-6B computer ( like a circular slide rule with a rectangular plotted slider inside that can be moved to calculate wind direction, speed, airspeed, etc) has all you need to do it, I will scan a little 1944 navigation manual I have over here, I have used every bit of it except the finding a moving carrier after a mission ( three leg with estimates)...he he

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v306/Kurbalaganda/180px-E6b-front.jpg

buzzsaw1939
12-13-2007, 09:50 PM
Ah yes... Plotted many a course with one of those, I here now days they use a digital.