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View Full Version : Mini Propellars on the TB-3 WWhat for?



Jimston2008
08-22-2009, 12:53 AM
I always think to my self, what is the purpose of these mini propellers mounted top side on zee TB-3?

I've heard a rumor stating that Stalin him self ordered that hand cranked wheels be installed on bomber aircraft, so that in the event of an engine failure, Comrade Alexi and comrade Vladimir for example, could crank wheel in order to spin min propellers for save life of soviet crew?

Can this be true? knowing Stalin, it might have been. Maybe i shouldn't post while having booze in my system.

I see that spell check even corrects "Stalin's" name if spelled wrong! I see he is still watching, even keeping a sturdy eye on spell check him self...

I_JG78_Max
08-22-2009, 01:11 AM
I'd bet, that this fan has the same function like the one of the Me-163 Komet. Powering electrical systems. Maybe an electric heater.

III/JG27_Max

AndyJWest
08-22-2009, 05:59 AM
It it drives a generator that powers the electromagnet that holds the pencil onto the navigator's chart table, even while flying inverted. Another triumph of Glorious Soviet Technology:


Lenin: "Socialism is the Soviet power plus electrification of the whole country."

JtD
08-22-2009, 07:54 AM
Originally posted by AndyJWest:
It it drives a generator that powers the electromagnet that holds the pencil onto the navigator's chart table, even while flying inverted.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Choctaw111
08-22-2009, 10:24 AM
Originally posted by AndyJWest:
It it drives a generator that powers the electromagnet that holds the pencil onto the navigator's chart table, even while flying inverted. Another triumph of Glorious Soviet Technology:



That was my good laugh for the day http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif . Thanks for that.

rnzoli
08-22-2009, 10:44 AM
Originally posted by AndyJWest:
It it drives a generator that powers the electromagnet that holds the pencil onto the navigator's chart table, even while flying inverted. Another triumph of Glorious Soviet Technology:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">
Lenin: "Socialism is the Soviet power plus electrification of the whole country."
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>
That's good fun, but not true. In war-time Soviet state, you could only do what your superiors explicitly permitted to you.

This was true not only to people, but in fact, any objects and nature also. And since the TB-3 was never imagined to fly inverted, the pencil never received the permission to fall off the desk.

So the mini propellor are for something else. Primmitive speed measurement maybe?

But I think there is one on the DC-3's as well, in the rear, on the side.

Jimston2008
08-22-2009, 10:56 AM
I started this thread for the sake of a few good laughs. I hope many more are to follow!

Maybe it powers a generator for purpose of keeping vodka warm.

I still love the idea of a drunk air crew having to spin a wheel in order to turn a propeller driven aircraft.

Put down that vodka Alexi! you must turn wheel faster for take off!

AndyJWest
08-22-2009, 11:01 AM
...the pencil never received the permission to fall off the desk.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

To return to Jimston's op I'd like to suggest that the spell check is not run by Stalinist agents at all, but is clearly evidence of Yankee Imperialism at work, defacing perfectly good UK English orthography with horrible red underlinings.

Actually, these things are generators, and if I remember correctly, even modern airliners sometimes have 'pop-out' ones for emergencies. No doubt by the time I get back from the shops someone will have found a photo...

Lt_Letum
08-22-2009, 11:18 AM
Ahh! I assumed it was a pre-pitot device.

RAF_OldBuzzard
08-22-2009, 11:52 AM
Originally posted by Lt_Letum:
Ahh! I assumed it was a pre-pitot device.

That can work.

Many, MANY moons ago, when I was flying RC Sailplanes, there was a 'goodie' that would monitor and send back airspeed and engine RPM. There was transmitter and two units that mounted in the aircraft. There was a CCD sensor that you nounted behind the prop on a powered plane for RPMs, and another with a tiny propellor that you mounted anywhere OTHER than behind the prop for airspeed. There was also a handheld receiver that you used for monitoring the info.

It actually worked quite well. The only thing I wasn't too happy about it was that the readout was in KMPH, and not MPH.

AllorNothing117
08-24-2009, 04:05 PM
HAHA! ^_^ Reminds me abiit of

"The Biro was invented by the americans in their race to the moon against Russia. It cost millions to invent and produce. It was truely revolutionary, the first Pen that could right upside down perfect for space where there is no gravity. The Russians used a pencil."

AndyJWest
08-24-2009, 04:48 PM
Originally posted by AllorNothing117:
HAHA! ^_^ Reminds me abiit of

"The Biro was invented by the americans in their race to the moon against Russia. It cost millions to invent and produce. It was truely revolutionary, the first Pen that could right upside down perfect for space where there is no gravity. The Russians used a pencil."

Pah! more Yankee Imperialism. The Biro was invented by a Hungarian - László Bíró (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/László_Bíró)

The anti-gravity electromagnetic pencil was of course a product of the Glorious Soviet Union.

major_setback
08-25-2009, 01:37 AM
Originally posted by AndyJWest:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by AllorNothing117:
HAHA! ^_^ Reminds me abiit of

"The Biro was invented by the americans in their race to the moon against Russia. It cost millions to invent and produce. It was truely revolutionary, the first Pen that could right upside down perfect for space where there is no gravity. The Russians used a pencil."

Pah! more Yankee Imperialism. The Biro was invented by a Hungarian - .... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well, I heard this told as a joke many years ago - one showing that a huge investment can sometimes be avoided by intelligently applying a simple idea. Pointing out the ingeniousness of the Soviets.

RPMcMurphy
08-25-2009, 05:02 AM
Originally posted by I_JG78_Max:
I'd bet, that this fan has the same function like the one of the Me-163 Komet. Powering electrical systems. Maybe an electric heater.

III/JG27_Max
I was in a museum in Germnay when I overheard a guy standing next to me explain to his young daughter after she had pointed at the small fan blades on the nose of an Me-163 and ask the obvious question. He inevetibley answered that it was in-fact a propeller. I did'nt have the heart to interfere. Sometimes it is hopeless.


At the last airshow I attended I overheard a young AirForce guy answer a question from a patron. The Airforce guy was in uniform and standing near a roped-off fully restored B5N Japanese Torpedo Bomber. The guy explained that the plane was a MIG 17 designed for special rocon. Its amazing how stupid some people are at airshows.

AndyJWest
08-25-2009, 06:40 AM
I'm sure most of you know what the 'propellers' on the Stuka undercarriage are for, but does anyone know of another aircraft that used them for the same purpose?

Choctaw111
08-25-2009, 07:04 AM
Originally posted by AndyJWest:
I'm sure most of you know what the 'propellers' on the Stuka undercarriage are for, but does anyone know of another aircraft that used them for the same purpose?

Another German aircraft, or did another country use this "fear device" as well?

AndyJWest
08-25-2009, 08:04 AM
Either/both - just curious...

I wonder what effect they had on performance? Quite draggy, you'd think.

Edit ----

Just realised that my earlier post looks like a question I know the answer to - I don't...

Freiwillige
08-25-2009, 03:49 PM
Not to my knowledge. The Stuka was the only aircraft to use the "Trumpets of Jericho" Siren for psychological warfare. It worked brilliantly early in the war and did its job of creating panic. As it got louder and louder every soldier thought it was coming right for him!

RPMcMurphy
08-26-2009, 12:25 AM
Hey that gives me an idea; I think I'll attach a whistle to my RC Pipercub just for the fun of it while diving in and for low passes.

R_Target
08-26-2009, 04:43 AM
NASA space pen: bogus.

http://www.snopes.com/business/genius/spacepen.asp

AndyJWest
08-26-2009, 05:28 AM
Originally posted by R_Target:
NASA space pen: bogus.

http://www.snopes.com/business/genius/spacepen.asp

Ah, yes, but NASA clearly copied the Soviet Space Pencil design. Filthy Capitalist/Imperialist CIA spies no doubt...

Mercwolf2
08-29-2009, 05:43 AM
~S~

It is to flow vodka into the engine and the crew to increase performance from all. Vodka fuel injector crank.

squareusr
08-29-2009, 09:30 AM
The small propellor was put there for future generations to puzzle at. Soviet engineers were perfectly aware of making history.

(and, to keep with the stereotype, had the vodka supplies necessary to enjoy this kind of easter egg in their designs - the Me 163 propellor on the other hand was merely an uninformed attempt at copying the amazing pencil-holding capabilities of the TB-3)