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View Full Version : Interview with Hungarian 109 Pilot Michael Karatsonyi!



XyZspineZyX
07-09-2003, 02:17 AM
Hello, everybody! It's been a while since I've had a chance to really sit down and talk with my fellow sim junkies! Man, I'm really upset to see such a spamed forum lately due to the delay of the patch. Anyway, two weeks ago, I met an incredible man in Woodland Hills, California (in Los Angeles) in the Wings over Wendy's program where pilots from both WWII, Korea and Vietnam come to eat and to chat (and sometimes brag!) about their glory days as pilots. I was privalaged to meet Mr. Michael Karatsonyi, a former Messerchmitt 109 G6 pilot in Hungary during mid 1944 who was actually shot down. (I do indeed have pictures to prove it but somebody would need to post them online for me.) I sat down with him and he told me his story. When Hungary and Germany united, he was told by the Germans to either be par to the airforce as a fighter pilot or be sent to a concentration camp since he was Jewish. Easy decision! Unfortunately I didn't get to talk with him as long as I would have liked but we spoke a great deal about the 109G6. He absoultely loved that plane, saying that it was like "riding a horse and being in the saddle." To this day, he still likes to fly and visit the old warbird collection in Santa Monica, CA where a gorgeous 109 E4 remains. He told me about his last sortie of the war when his group was flying CAP (I believe) at 27000ft. The German Luftwafe guys didn't really care about the Hungarians so they went off on there own. There, Karatsonyi was one of only 4 Hungarian pilots in the air when suddenly he saw 4 Mustangs that quickly grew to over 20 Mustangs in the sky just above him! He requested permission to engage but base told him to just hold tight. He was so frustrated because he knew that he wouldn't stand a chance if he didn't engage. One Mustang got on his friend's tail at his three o'clock so I had to help him out. He got right on his six and started to score some hits when he was suddenly jolted by the piercing .50s that hit his fuel line through the middle of his cockpit. His instrument panel burst into flames as his 109 began to plumet to the ground. He frantically tried to open his canopy but it had jammed! After about 20 seconds, he finally got it open and all that he remembered after that was hitting the ground having only deployed his parachute only a few hundred meters before crashing. When he landed, his uniform was almost totally burned off his body and he was over 40% burned. Luckily, a farmer and his daughter rushed over and placed him in a police car that had been dispatched after somebody had thought an invasion was occuring due to the many Luftwaffe pilots shot down that day. He told me that if he had not been taken in within five minutes, he would have most certainly died. Until he arrived in the United States after the war for plastic surgery, he could barely close his eyes because his eye lids had been singed off by the fire. It was one of the most incredible experiences listening to an 80 year old man speak to me about his days as a pilot. I only wished I could have shown him FB so he could finally be with his old 109! If somebody is interested in hosting pictures, you can send me a message on the forum. Here's one picture I found of him when he was much younger with his 109 but I have three others to show anybody that I took with my digital camera if they're interested. Thanks!

http://members.cox.net/salvagemike/aviators/images/combat_pilots/karatsonyi.jpg


http://www.brooksart.com/TyphoonHP.jpg

---------------------------------------
Mors Ianua Vitae (sed mori nolo!)

-Artes Latinae (L186 Anon)-



Message Edited on 07/08/0306:18PM by MackZ

XyZspineZyX
07-09-2003, 02:17 AM
Hello, everybody! It's been a while since I've had a chance to really sit down and talk with my fellow sim junkies! Man, I'm really upset to see such a spamed forum lately due to the delay of the patch. Anyway, two weeks ago, I met an incredible man in Woodland Hills, California (in Los Angeles) in the Wings over Wendy's program where pilots from both WWII, Korea and Vietnam come to eat and to chat (and sometimes brag!) about their glory days as pilots. I was privalaged to meet Mr. Michael Karatsonyi, a former Messerchmitt 109 G6 pilot in Hungary during mid 1944 who was actually shot down. (I do indeed have pictures to prove it but somebody would need to post them online for me.) I sat down with him and he told me his story. When Hungary and Germany united, he was told by the Germans to either be par to the airforce as a fighter pilot or be sent to a concentration camp since he was Jewish. Easy decision! Unfortunately I didn't get to talk with him as long as I would have liked but we spoke a great deal about the 109G6. He absoultely loved that plane, saying that it was like "riding a horse and being in the saddle." To this day, he still likes to fly and visit the old warbird collection in Santa Monica, CA where a gorgeous 109 E4 remains. He told me about his last sortie of the war when his group was flying CAP (I believe) at 27000ft. The German Luftwafe guys didn't really care about the Hungarians so they went off on there own. There, Karatsonyi was one of only 4 Hungarian pilots in the air when suddenly he saw 4 Mustangs that quickly grew to over 20 Mustangs in the sky just above him! He requested permission to engage but base told him to just hold tight. He was so frustrated because he knew that he wouldn't stand a chance if he didn't engage. One Mustang got on his friend's tail at his three o'clock so I had to help him out. He got right on his six and started to score some hits when he was suddenly jolted by the piercing .50s that hit his fuel line through the middle of his cockpit. His instrument panel burst into flames as his 109 began to plumet to the ground. He frantically tried to open his canopy but it had jammed! After about 20 seconds, he finally got it open and all that he remembered after that was hitting the ground having only deployed his parachute only a few hundred meters before crashing. When he landed, his uniform was almost totally burned off his body and he was over 40% burned. Luckily, a farmer and his daughter rushed over and placed him in a police car that had been dispatched after somebody had thought an invasion was occuring due to the many Luftwaffe pilots shot down that day. He told me that if he had not been taken in within five minutes, he would have most certainly died. Until he arrived in the United States after the war for plastic surgery, he could barely close his eyes because his eye lids had been singed off by the fire. It was one of the most incredible experiences listening to an 80 year old man speak to me about his days as a pilot. I only wished I could have shown him FB so he could finally be with his old 109! If somebody is interested in hosting pictures, you can send me a message on the forum. Here's one picture I found of him when he was much younger with his 109 but I have three others to show anybody that I took with my digital camera if they're interested. Thanks!

http://members.cox.net/salvagemike/aviators/images/combat_pilots/karatsonyi.jpg


http://www.brooksart.com/TyphoonHP.jpg

---------------------------------------
Mors Ianua Vitae (sed mori nolo!)

-Artes Latinae (L186 Anon)-



Message Edited on 07/08/0306:18PM by MackZ

XyZspineZyX
07-09-2003, 02:28 AM
It's always very nice to hear (read) about those pilots who survived the war and are "alive and kicking".

Derzasi

XyZspineZyX
07-09-2003, 05:00 AM
Bump!

http://www.brooksart.com/TyphoonHP.jpg

---------------------------------------
Mors Ianua Vitae (sed mori nolo!)

-Artes Latinae (L186 Anon)-

XyZspineZyX
07-09-2003, 05:15 AM
5 victories


an ace then http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

XyZspineZyX
07-09-2003, 07:36 AM
hi, here is an other pic of him.

plébános

<img src=http://www.extra.hu/mkhlegiero/PILOTA/KARATS/karats01.jpg>

"Der ganze Revierkreis muss total schwarz sein"

Erich Hartmann