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jakethesnake214
08-07-2007, 12:04 PM
Is a setting of 100 across the board for joystick settings realistic?

jakethesnake214
08-07-2007, 12:04 PM
Is a setting of 100 across the board for joystick settings realistic?

Capt.LoneRanger
08-07-2007, 12:52 PM
No. The big problem is, that you can easily move a 20cm plastic stick, but if you fly at 500kph, there is an enormous pressure on the stick, that you have to overcome and you got to move the stick over a way larger area.

To simulate that, you either have to set filters higher or use a lower curve on the input values.

Fireball_
08-07-2007, 02:37 PM
I've got a related question:

My joystick settings for pitch and roll are both:

1 4 9 16 25 36 49 64 81 100

I saw those suggested somewhere, and tried them. They made the joystick less 'twitchy' than whatever the default settins were. (And also it's a neat mathematical progression. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif)

But I've never really understood what those numbers really mean. I have a 9 in the third position. What does that physically mean in terms of joystick movement and aircraft response, versus someone for example who has a 100 in that position?

horseback
08-07-2007, 04:14 PM
As I no doubt imperfectly understand it, Il-2 has a 'force applied' system rather than a mere 'angle applied' system for controller inputs.

If the maximum force a pilot could apply to his joystick or rudder pedals was 50 lbs/22 kg, then if your sensitivity is set to 100(%?), then your stick will move that far rather quickly. By setting your sensitivities rather low, and smoothly increasing them, you avoid the obvious problems of a 'spiky' or dirty potentiometer in your stick or rudder pedals, PLUS you don't overdrive your control input.

The negative side of this is that you have to learn to fly and control each aircraft type individually, because some aircraft have MUCH lighter control input than others.

Spending a week flying 109s and then switching to Mustangs (or vice versa) can be positively traumatic if you don't maintain a seperate set of control settings for them (and even then...)

cheers

horseback