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View Full Version : The worst problem to have trying to make a night trap in Pacific Fighters



jamesdietz
03-13-2005, 01:21 PM
> Subject: Nights like this...
>
> A Hornet pilot friend of mine, now departed, told this story about one
> of his early cruises. We've all been there and had nights like this to some
> degree.

> Every carrier pilot sooner or later has his "night in the barrel."
> It's a flight - invariably at night - when you just can't get back on
> the boat. Maybe it's the pilot having an off night, maybe it's the
> position of the planets. Whatever it is, it's a night you don't
> forget - no matter how much you want to.
>
> It was the mid 80's. Jack - we'll call him that, though his name is
> lost to us - was flying a venerable A-7 light bomber. Introduced in
> the 60's, The Corsair II had big fuel tanks and long endurance - and
> that was good, because Jack couldn't catch a break. Twice his
> tailhook failed to catch a wire - a bolter, he went around to try
> again. He was waived off, the reason doesn't matter, he went around
> and tried again. Another bolter. Another waive off. Another bolter.
>
> By this time his was the last plane in the air. Another wave off.
> And, despite the big fuel tanks, the ship had to launch a tanker to
> re-fuel him in the air.
>
> By this time everyone on the ship knew what was happening. The planes
> returned to the ship after tanking, the tanker landed. Jack had
> another try. Another bolter. Another wave off.
>
> Finally he made it down, catching a fair 3 wire. The plane pulled up
> short.
>
> Now when you're about to touch down on a carrier you push the
> throttles forward to afterburner. The engines take a few seconds to
> "spool up" and come to full power, by advancing the throttles early
> you have the power up if you bolter. Of course, as soon as you catch
> a wire and come to a stop, you pull the throttles back to idle.
>
> The other thing you do after you catch a wire is turn off the strobes
> on the exterior of the plane. They're very powerful, and you don't
> want to blind the people on deck.
>
> Jack pulled back on the throttle, and went to idle. But he left the
> strobes on. CAG - the Commander, Air Group - didn't want to embarrass
> him, so he picked up the mike and said over the radio and over the PA
> "Lights."
>
> Nothing happened. CAG waited. The strobes kept blinking. He picked
> up the mike again and said "Lights on deck."
>
> Again, nothing. Finally CAG picked up the mike and said "Bluehawk 4,
> strobes are on, extinguish lights on deck."
>
> There was a moment, but only a moment, before Jack replied over the
> radio, and over the PA.
>
> "CAG, do I bother you when you're taking a dump?" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif

jamesdietz
03-13-2005, 01:21 PM
> Subject: Nights like this...
>
> A Hornet pilot friend of mine, now departed, told this story about one
> of his early cruises. We've all been there and had nights like this to some
> degree.

> Every carrier pilot sooner or later has his "night in the barrel."
> It's a flight - invariably at night - when you just can't get back on
> the boat. Maybe it's the pilot having an off night, maybe it's the
> position of the planets. Whatever it is, it's a night you don't
> forget - no matter how much you want to.
>
> It was the mid 80's. Jack - we'll call him that, though his name is
> lost to us - was flying a venerable A-7 light bomber. Introduced in
> the 60's, The Corsair II had big fuel tanks and long endurance - and
> that was good, because Jack couldn't catch a break. Twice his
> tailhook failed to catch a wire - a bolter, he went around to try
> again. He was waived off, the reason doesn't matter, he went around
> and tried again. Another bolter. Another waive off. Another bolter.
>
> By this time his was the last plane in the air. Another wave off.
> And, despite the big fuel tanks, the ship had to launch a tanker to
> re-fuel him in the air.
>
> By this time everyone on the ship knew what was happening. The planes
> returned to the ship after tanking, the tanker landed. Jack had
> another try. Another bolter. Another wave off.
>
> Finally he made it down, catching a fair 3 wire. The plane pulled up
> short.
>
> Now when you're about to touch down on a carrier you push the
> throttles forward to afterburner. The engines take a few seconds to
> "spool up" and come to full power, by advancing the throttles early
> you have the power up if you bolter. Of course, as soon as you catch
> a wire and come to a stop, you pull the throttles back to idle.
>
> The other thing you do after you catch a wire is turn off the strobes
> on the exterior of the plane. They're very powerful, and you don't
> want to blind the people on deck.
>
> Jack pulled back on the throttle, and went to idle. But he left the
> strobes on. CAG - the Commander, Air Group - didn't want to embarrass
> him, so he picked up the mike and said over the radio and over the PA
> "Lights."
>
> Nothing happened. CAG waited. The strobes kept blinking. He picked
> up the mike again and said "Lights on deck."
>
> Again, nothing. Finally CAG picked up the mike and said "Bluehawk 4,
> strobes are on, extinguish lights on deck."
>
> There was a moment, but only a moment, before Jack replied over the
> radio, and over the PA.
>
> "CAG, do I bother you when you're taking a dump?" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif

ChicagoChad
03-14-2005, 10:36 PM
Anyone here like a night PF mission?

Texas LongHorn
03-15-2005, 11:05 AM
That story is a crack-up. I was on the Old Connie and heard variations of the tale repeated many times. We flew Intruders but the A-7 was always my second favorite AC. All the best, LongHorn