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MB_Avro_UK
08-30-2007, 04:05 PM
hi all,

What's your experience of cultural differences between nations?

I have a couple of examples. I'm a Brit (but I regard myself as English first and British second....and European third http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif).

I noticed in my visits to France and Germany that it is considered to be bad behaviour if you cross a road when the pedestrian crossing light is on Red.

When I visited Munich a couple of years ago my girlfriend crossed the street when the the light was Red for pedestrians.There were no cars approaching so she crossed the street.

Many of the people waiting 'tut-tutted' and expressed their annoyance. In England (Britain) this is not a problem.

A friend of mine did the same in France a few years ago and met with great hostility from a police officer.

Britain has a problem with young men and women drinking too much. But this has been the same problem for at least 400 years. In the 1600s the media as it was then complained that young men were getting drunk and involved in fights...and how could this be stopped etc.

But in the rest of Europe, and as far as I'm aware the same goes for the US, this is not a great problem.

I was in Australia last year (Sydney and NSW) and the alcohol problem was not the same as in the UK.

I also noticed that there is a greater degree of formality in France and Germany than Britain with regard to their language and social interaction.

Please accept my apologies for digressing from il2 matters. But I find this subject interesting.

If all nations and cultures were identical the world would be a less interesting place http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif.

Waiting for BoB SoW updates..

Best Regards,
MB_Avro.

danjama
08-30-2007, 04:15 PM
i find we can experience all culturees without leaving the comfort of the country, right here in london

is that a good or bad thing? who knows...

MB_Avro_UK
08-30-2007, 05:09 PM
Originally posted by danjama:
i find we can experience all culturees without leaving the comfort of the country, right here in london

is that a good or bad thing? who knows...

hi danjama,

I live in London. London IMO is an 'international country'.

It is a magnet for people from around the world.I use the 'tube' almost daily and I estimate that 70% of the passengers are from other countries.

The migration of people to London creates interesting cultural challenges.Britain has throughout history been a mix of cultures from around the world.

Our English language (touching upon a current thread) is a mix of German,French,Latin/Greek and Scandinavian. And also native Celt.

Are mongerels stronger than pure bread pedigrees?

And do people of different cultures entwine?

Should we preserve cultural differences? And if so why?

Will the Spitfire in BoB SoW have self-sealing fuel tanks? These are questions that MUST be answered.

Best Regards http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
MB_Avro.

Blutarski2004
08-30-2007, 05:12 PM
Originally posted by MB_Avro_UK:

I noticed in my visits to France and Germany that it is considered to be bad behaviour if you cross a road when the pedestrian crossing light is on Red.

When I visited Munich a couple of years ago my girlfriend crossed the street when the the light was Red for pedestrians.There were no cars approaching so she crossed the street.

Many of the people waiting 'tut-tutted' and expressed their annoyance.


..... I can confirm your Munich story. I used to travel fairly often to Munich. Whenever I went, I had a standing date to dine with two women business colleagues/friends. Angelika was a Bavarian; Katerina was German-Spanish and had grown up in France.

On one trip, we ended up in the university district for some Japanese food. After a long dinner we took a digestive walk and stopped at a late night wine bar for cocktails and dessert. By the time we got out, it was about 2:30am and there was not a soul or car on the streets - completely empty.

On our somewhat lengthy way back to the cars, we came to a traffic intersection with the lights showing against us. Katerina and I looked both ways, saw absolutely no signs of life and proceeded to cross the street. After strolling along another 25 yards or so, it dawned on us that Angelika was no longer in company. Katerina and I turned around to look for her and saw her standing absolutely solitary on the other side of the intersection still waiting for the light to change.

There's a story, supposedly attributed to Lenin, to the effect that if a band of German revolutionaries were ordered to go and seize a train station, they would all march down and then line up to purchase tickets.

A general cultural difference - Europeans eat much better than we do here in the States. I find the food better both in the restaurants and in the homes of friends. Sometimes I think that the art of cooking is disappearing in America.

danjama
08-30-2007, 05:28 PM
IMHO it is not an issue for us born here to integrate, but it is an issue to many who come to live here. To me this is wrong, as they should not come here unless they will respect and preserve the culture of us born here. Many are not doing that unfortunately.

However, there are obviously people not willing to watch people immigrate here and keep their own cultures and traditions, and i dont agree with this either. People should be allowed to be what they want, and be opened minded to others, no matter where they are in the world.

I believe cultural differences should be preserved, but should not be at the forefront of our minds, and should not divide people here, especially in the obvious way that it has done already between certain groups here in the big smoke.

Skoshi Tiger
08-30-2007, 06:37 PM
There is a bit of rivalry between us Australians and the Kiwis. It's fairly funny really.

We both tell the same sheep jokes about each other. The Kiwis refer to Australia as the 'Western Island' of New Zealand and the N.Z. is often called the 7th State by Ozzies.

When I was staying in England, I was living in a shared house and when Australia was playing England in the Rugby the Kiwi's in the house decided to become 'Australian' for the afternoon.

Most of the time Non-Aussie/Kiwi's just scratched their heads and couldn't work out what we were on about!

luftluuver
08-30-2007, 06:59 PM
Originally posted by danjama:
IMHO it is not an issue for us born here to integrate, but it is an issue to many who come to live here. To me this is wrong, as they should not come here unless they will respect and preserve the culture of us born here. Many are not doing that unfortunately.
But they learned that from the Brits during their colonization days.

Jutocsa
08-30-2007, 07:36 PM
Dont know about Germans acting weird when crossing red lights, but one thing is sure. We here at Lake Balaton are usually upset how tourists behave (well, mostly German) but as soon as a German sits behind wheels, he/she is the most polite person in the world. Even if you just closing on a crossing, they stop the car and let you cross. But maybe its quite common...I recently stated in my mind that we have the worst driving ethics.

As for cultural differences, I love them. Even the ones in such a small country as mine. The east part still preserves some Cumanian heritage from Mongol times, with at least 3-4 different Cumanian or Asian Turkic ethnic group.We have plenty of small fractions of Alans in the West, also lots of Swabian immigrants. Not to mention the Secler and Csángó Hungarians in Transsylvania.
As for generic cultural differences, we have one for sure, we dont clink our glasses when drinking beer. And we are genetically hardcoded for disagreement. There is absolutely no joining of forces here, not now, not in the past. Only when some serious **** happens.

I noticed, in general, the farther you go to the east, people become more and more friendly and helpful. (with the exception of that Turkish kid who threw stones at my gf shouting "money,money" http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif ) Mind you Im speaking in general and didnt say the opposite happens when going west. I have to admit that Brits are among the most polite ppl to my knowledge. Well, at least online, never been to Britain unfortunately http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Clipper_51
08-30-2007, 07:49 PM
The older I get, the more I love being an American. I know we have a pretty poor rep the world over, particularly nowadays, but it doesn't bother me.

I like our culture (at least most of it), our legal system, our political structure, our geography, our history, our general tolerance of others, our generosity, our sense of adventure and accomplishment and a host other fine attributes.

I don't think we're better than anyone else in the world, I just like what we are and what we represent.

I loved going to England last year and meeting the fine people there. They were very nice
My family and I had a nice time. I met a Hungarian bartender in London who insisted I visit his country to get a sense of what a great country is. I vowed to take him up on the offer. I made of point of telling the British bartenders that they deserved tips (and gave them good ones), even though you really shouldn't tip in pubs, or so I was told.

My father was very close with a Japanese man and through him I learned a lot of their culture. Beautiful people in a beautiful land.

I want to visit more countries before I pass on. I hope I can.

There is good and bad in all nations and people. We are all God's children. Hence, most of us are good.

BaldieJr
08-30-2007, 08:12 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

i respect everyones right to be dimwitted or narrow minded, no matter if by choice, or cultural indoctrination. you're all wonderfully stupid to me, and that what makes you so great.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

fabianfred
08-30-2007, 08:50 PM
When i was in the British army I spent seven years in Germany.....a lovely country...great food and nice people.... but they love to live by the letter of the law....and love uniforms too

In England the rules of the road can basically be summed-up by the phrase "giving way"..... if an accident happens on the road in germany....someone has broken a law....no question

AKA_TAGERT
08-30-2007, 09:01 PM
Differences?

Well here in the US we think XP is a good OS.. But in Germany they still think DOS is the way to go.. I know this to be true because the Germans are allways saying "DOS is gute"

That and they are master of the obvious.. or just hate to say good by.. Becaues each time you leave they feel the need to point out that "OUR-FEET-THE-SAME"

say it 3 times fast

leitmotiv
08-30-2007, 09:23 PM
We are all different, which is lucky or we'd be bored to death. My '60's generation great illusion was that we were all the same under the skin. Took me years to shake off this fallacy. I think it was LBJ who characteristically said during the Vietnam War "inside every Vietnamese is an American." Boy, was he wrong. We bunged it up again in Iraq by thinking inside every Iraqi was an American two party system voter ready to spring forth.

triad773
08-30-2007, 09:39 PM
I had visited many of the countries in Western Europe when I was much younger. One of the more interesting, yet mundane things I remember was that in Europe (generally speaking,) that people tend to shop every day, and shower once a week. In America, we tend to shower every day and shop once a week. Mind you, that was from the uneducated perspective of a twelve year old at the time.

Living in a large US city also means that the diversity of immigrants and their cultural influences locally bring a small part of other cultures here. We have a variety of great restaurants here- I'm lucky I am not more overweight than I am http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Cheers

Triad

Skoshi Tiger
08-30-2007, 09:45 PM
Originally posted by Clipper_51:
I like our .... ... our political structure

The problem is that nobody else in the world understands it! I'm not saying it's bad, just weird!

triad773
08-30-2007, 11:24 PM
Also I remember the bidet in water closets- particularly in France- our bellboy told us most Americans would fill it with ice and chill their champagne in it http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

I don't recall any time (yet) I have seen one of those in an American bathroom http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

But vive la différence!

Bewolf
08-31-2007, 03:57 AM
Considering my girlfriend is american and I've been over there several times, I think I am able to point out some personally percieved differences between the US and Germany.

Americans usually are more independent, seeing the government more as an alien beeing loosely connected to their homes, at best not interfering with personal life at all. Germans rely on state and community much more then americans do. Its more of an intigrated system over here then it's in the US, which has both advantages and disadvantages. Probably depends on personal ideology which to prefer. I personally like this "far away" government much better, though recent developents like the patriot act and homeland security leave me gravely worried, especially as its possible I will move to California with my girl soon. Don't like to be treated like a criminal on airports out of principle.

Toilets in the US are weird. basicly pools of water you can see your belongs swim in. Ew.

One definitive downside of the german social system, as much as I can see its benefits, is the barriers it builts up for ppl that want to start heir own thing, both in regulations and in general mindset. Already lacking some kind of independant thinking, ppl have a rough time getting into a "lets do it" mood, rather depending on the state to take care of it.
Then again, once at work, the more intengerated mindset makes team work much easier and productive. Ppl are willing to shove away their Egos to get things done effectivly. I also like not seeing as much homeless on the streets compared to american cities. Also, american cities have to belong to the dirtiest on this planet, only topped by the infrastructure (power cables everywhere, roads so full of holes I finally understood why american cars have as soft a suspenncion as they have) which reminded me more of post communism eastern block countries then a modern western one.

Starting businiss over here is hard, with all the regulations. Sucks big time.

School already defines a lot about people. In Germany you learn about the world. I personally was required to name every continent, and within that, every country and its capital, major mountains, rivers, lakes, deserts, forrests if huge enough. Same goes for history. I yet have to meet an american who knows where their own continent's name comes from. Not to speak about countless americans wondering that Germany France sharing a border or, even better, is not located in the middle east. I think this contributes greatly to americans egocentric view. Also, they hardly ever travel outside. With only Canada at the north or mexico to the South, that is understandable, though. In this regard I had some very interesting encounters in the more remote areas of the US.

America also appears to like to eliminate its own history. The only historic buildings I encountered where In Boston and Philadelphia, and even there only rarely. Not much is left anywhere else. Given the fact the Us does not have much history anyways, I consider it almost sacreligious what those guys do with the bit they have. Considering that most buildings in my hometome's city center are roughly between 500 and 1000 years old, I find this disturbing.

Americans smile a lot more and are more friendly in general. That said, and again just personal opinion, it appears to be more artificial, too. Especially in stores I always had the feelings that smiles were fake. I did not consider it honest and it left me with a feeling of attemtped manipulation. To a lesser degree this also applies to common people. Invites to visit are thrown around all the time, but once you ask when to come around ppl freeze. Odd.
Then again some ppl, despite aware of this, still prefer this behaviour to grumpy faces. Personal taste once again I suppose.

Germans are more harsh and unfriendly for sure in this regard, but also more honest. If you get an invite, which may take quite a while, you can be sure its ment honestly. Same with friendship in general. its harder to make friends, but those are more reliable then short termed american friends. Soo once again, both has it good and bad sides, depending on personal preference.

When it comes to politics and/or personal belives, I often wonder why america is not in a state of civil war again. In germany, when two followers of different parties meet, they may have a heated debate about political topics, then calm down again and have a beer.
In the US, followers of the democratic and republican party wage war against each other on a level unthinkable in Germany.
The same applies to regligion. Over here considered personal business you do not bring into other lives, I never have met so many ppl over there trying to talk to me about god. That was..unnerving, to say the least. Especially in the way it was done.

Then again, polititians over there are more personally accountable for their actions. Don't like your guys in the Senate and what he does? Don't reelect him. Over here its more party business who gets send to Berlin and who is not. You just vote foor the party you want yourself represented with. This way people here have less control over what is said and done in higher politics.

Do not let me get started over food habits, especially bread and beer. Ammerican bread is what I call "lava lamp" bread. Take one, press it down to the fullest, and watch it slowly regain its former volume oh so slowly. Highly fascinating. Then again, most foodstuff over there has a slight "chemical" taste to it anyways.

Sodas to be bought in Gallons rocks, though. So do bagles and steaks.
And I oh so wish they finally bring Wendie's and White Castle over here.

My girl once told me about american believes of europeans not shaving, having bad hygiene and wearing speedos all the time. Given that Europe has a much higher norm when it comes to cultural achievements, and also backed up by personal expiriences, I rather made opposite expriences. but that may also apply to different regions in Eruope. I do not know about hygiene standarts in most southern Europeans countries or France. France features some particulary dity cities as well, especially Paris, so that may be the source of it.

One last thing. Sommething, where the US is undoubtly number one in my book, is the country itself. Organnize lots of free time, rent a car in new York or L.A. and then just start driving and look where you end up. The landscape, the mountains, deserts, ciities. It's vast. You can drive for days on and on. Get into some diner in the middle of nowhere and talk to the people there. The amount of expiriences you can make is breathtaking.

neural_dream
08-31-2007, 04:01 AM
Originally posted by MB_Avro_UK:
I live in London. London IMO is an 'international country'.
It is a magnet for people from around the world. I use the 'tube' almost daily and I estimate that 70% of the passengers are from other countries.
I'm one of them. Greek if it matters.

Originally posted by Jutocsa:
We have plenty of small fractions of Alans in the West
Man, I was under the impression that the Alans had been wiped out of human history!

Originally posted by Bewolf:
Toilets in the US are weird. basicly pools of water you can see your belongs swim in. Ew.

That and the airports were my only bad experiences in the States.

Originally posted by Bewolf:
Especially in stores I always had the feelings that smiles were fake. I did not consider it honest and it left me with a feeling of attemtped manipulation.
Oh yeah, that too. Result of the obligatory 15% tipping culture.

danjama
08-31-2007, 04:10 AM
Originally posted by luftluuver:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by danjama:
IMHO it is not an issue for us born here to integrate, but it is an issue to many who come to live here. To me this is wrong, as they should not come here unless they will respect and preserve the culture of us born here. Many are not doing that unfortunately.
But they learned that from the Brits during their colonization days. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

then why do they want to come here?!

Bewolf
08-31-2007, 04:38 AM
Now to Germany and Britain.

I think from all european countries, aside Austria, Germany and Britain share most cultural similiarities. At least at the very basics. The few times I have been to Britain made me feel that I did not have to adept when it comes to treating foreigners, shopping, beer and so on. Nothing much one can do wrong there when it comes to basic conceptions of manners and behaviour. Aside the language, the typical german and british grunt prolly would have a good time together talking bout the same problems and joys while having the same drinks and basic foods. Differences appear on the higher levels, though. When it comes to humor, for example. British appear to have a certain sense of humor that applies when they make fun of or offend other nationalities, and like to point that out once yoou aske them about the percieved hostility. The problems arise when you try to make the same kind of fun they throw at you about the british. Only they appear to be allowed to make fun of themselves, as soon a foreigner does it, its over. This hypocriisy kinda leaves me with a foul mood as soon "british humor" is mentioned.

British also appear to live more in the past then germans. Countless references in modern Britian date back to empire days. From the otusiders perspective it appears as if the british never managed to live on and their self esteem is almost solely based on the past, not the now. Over here ppl rather dislike the past, out of obvious reasons. but this also means ppl concentrate more onto the now and the future. The bit of patriotic feeling and pride in this country comes from rather modern achievements in industry, sports and community.

On the other hands, the empire days made britian into an international community, with ppl from all over the world there. Much more open for new stuff and less prejudiced, at least in the higher levels, britian is in a much better position for future development then Germany. Ppl over here, though not hostile towards other nationalities in general (we have our fair share of Neonazis), rather prefer to stick to themselves.

Baffling, similiar to the Us, is the amount of liberites pushed away in the name of security. Considering The US and Britian having been a role model in civil rights and human rights in former times, they now serve as an axample of exxegerated paranoia, willing to shove away centuries of achivements in fear of terror attacks. Big brother is watching you comes to mind everytime its about Britian or the US. Though there are similar tendencies in Germany, as of now nothing of that magnitute came into effect here, which I consider very lucky. I rather take the risk of beeing killed in a terrorist attackk nowdays (which is far less then the risk of beeing killed in a car accident) to preserve what countless generations and millions of people died for in former times.

DIRTY-MAC
08-31-2007, 04:58 AM
The Swede according to wikipedia:

National character
It is difficult to pinpoint the national character of the Swedes considering the differences between the people of Skåne and Lappland or city and countryside for instance.

Many Swedes have rather reserved personalities compared to other cultures, which has led to the stereotype of quiet, cold, unfriendly Swedes. However, in spite of the common shyness, Swedes are generally nice, friendly people, just typically less outgoing than many other cultures.[5] As such, Swedes tend to be somewhat wary around unknown people, and it can be difficult for foreigners and immigrants to assimilate in Sweden.[5][6] At the same time, Swedes are well known for their tolerance and appreciation of other cultures.[7] Many people have noticed a dramatic difference between winter Swedes and summer Swedes, because people's moods tend to be affected by the cold, dark winters.[8] One misconception is that Sweden and the Swedes are overly[citation needed] permissive regarding sex and nudism. This misconception may be due to Sweden's early legalization of pornography and early implementation of sex education in school.[citation needed] These days, Sweden is not very tolerant of the sex industry.[citation needed] Paying for a sex worker's services is illegal and pornography is seen as oppressive and degrading, particularly to women[citation needed], by most leading politicians.[citation needed]

Many Swedes enjoy hiking as well as using nature for various forms of exercise and/or recreation, such as picking berries and mushrooms or hunting.[7] Possibly as a result of Allemansrätten [9], the right of public access to the wilderness, allowing almost free access to nature even on private property. For Swedes, taking a walk in the woods is not unlike a visit to church.[7]

As elsewhere in Scandinavia, Swedes often take pride in having an average social standing. If you are rich you often don't show it off in a manner that looks out of the ordinary and you often downplay it when talking about it. If you have a large house in the archipelago you may say that you have "A house a bit outside town."[7] Lagom is a Swedish word that lacks a counterpart in most languages. It basically means "just the right amount, but not too much." This explains the Swedish desire to live a normal, pleasant life. Elitism is often frowned upon, and Swedes speak of Jantelagen and Swedish jealousy as norms which keep people in their place, even though these norms have become slightly more lax in recent years. Egalitarianism remains a strong ideal in Sweden. Swedes prefer a polite yet casual form of interaction, without strict rules dividing social groups. It is perfectly normal to greet your boss or teacher using first name or nickname.[7]

Since for the larger part of the year the weather is wet in one way or another Swedes remove their shoes when visiting somebody. If it's a more formal occasion you bring indoor shoes with you in a bag and change.[7]

Throughout the 1960s and 1970s Sweden was an international leader in what is now referred to as the sexual revolution, with gender equality particularly promoted during this time.[8]

Physically, Swedes are often stereotyped as being tall, beautiful and blonde; with strikingly fair complexions; long, thick, blond hair; green or blue eyes; and a generally elegant disposition. As with most stereotypes, this one is somewhat inaccurate; just under 50% of Swedes are naturally blonde with another 25% having light brown hair (which is a relatively high rate of blonde and light brown hair compared to the United States or other Germanic speaking countries such as England), plenty are not lean but not overweight, and the Lapps in the north of Sweden have dark hair and eye colour (though many would not consider them to be "ethnic Swedish").


[edit] Alcohol
Main article: Alcoholic beverages in Sweden
Sweden is located in the vodka belt and drinking was a problem until the temperance movement gained influence. Swedes now rarely drink alcohol during the work week, but instead binge drink during the weekends, although drinking habits have become more 'continental' in recent decades.[7] As such many Swedes tend to become much more outgoing on the weekends. To prevent excessive drinking, alcohol sales are handled by a government monopoly, Systembolaget, who impose a high sales tax. The high cost of alcohol, which is even higher in pubs and restaurants, has led to the tradition of grunda (building a foundation), fökröka ("pre-drinking") or fövärma ("pre-heat"), i.e. gathering at home and drinking before going out.

some average swedes
http://img135.imageshack.us/img135/1096/swedes0nb.jpg

danjama
08-31-2007, 05:08 AM
WOW THEY ARE ALL GORGEOUS, EVERY ONE OF THEM

SEND THEM TO MY HOUSE WHEN YOUR FINISHED http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/inlove.gif

Jutocsa
08-31-2007, 05:10 AM
Originally posted by neural_dream:

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Jutocsa:
We have plenty of small fractions of Alans in the West
Man, I was under the impression that the Alans had been wiped out of human history!
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thats a wrong impression http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Just because a nation doesnt have an own country it doesnt necesserely means they automatically dissolve into the majority. Our Cumans kept their language up to the 1800s for example. As for Alans, they are very much alive, its only they are called Ossetians now in Russia and Georgia.

Another thing to the "Americans think Europeans dont shave and bath" It doesnt take an American to have prejudices like that. Eastern Europe considers the West a bit the same, as people who dont shower everyday http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Also, I still would like to meet a French who knew the location of Hungary. Probably Id be happy if they didnt ask: Do you speak English there ? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Von_Rat
08-31-2007, 05:12 AM
do the swedes really have a "swedish bikini team"?

Blutarski2004
08-31-2007, 05:20 AM
Bewolf,

Thoroughly enjoyed reading both your posts. They are insightful, entertaining, and IMO pretty much on the mark as far as the USA goes.

I'll toss in some observations from my European business experiences.

Germans, Austrians and the Dutch were for me the easiest people to do business with; they are aggressive, direct, can make a fast decision.

The French seem very distrustful of strangers and can be rather rude. It takes forever to make the first deal. But after a relationship has been developed, everything changes 180 degrees.

The Spanish are, in general, exceedingly polite - often to a fault. But it can sometime be difficult to get the straight story.

I've never been able to make a deal in Italy. It's a complete cultural dis-connect for me.

Maybe it's because the US is a nation of imigrants, but my experiences here in my own nation range from the German style of business down to the worst type of scum - people too dishonest to be in used car sales.

Bewolf
08-31-2007, 05:59 AM
Well, what to say about France.


I think this...
http://www.main-rheiner.de/bilder/140362265.jpg

....describes her best.

WN_Barbarossa
08-31-2007, 06:04 AM
Originally posted by Jutocsa:

As for cultural differences, I love them. Even the ones in such a small country as mine. The east part still preserves some Cumanian heritage from Mongol times, with at least 3-4 different Cumanian or Asian Turkic ethnic group.We have plenty of small fractions of Alans in the West, also lots of Swabian immigrants.

Alans? Here in Hungary? Are you sure? I thought they lived in Ossetia.


And we are genetically hardcoded for disagreement.

Well, I can't agree with this. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Cheers!

Airmail109
08-31-2007, 06:05 AM
Originally posted by DIRTY-MAC:
The Swede according to wikipedia:

National character
It is difficult to pinpoint the national character of the Swedes considering the differences between the people of Skåne and Lappland or city and countryside for instance.

Many Swedes have rather reserved personalities compared to other cultures, which has led to the stereotype of quiet, cold, unfriendly Swedes. However, in spite of the common shyness, Swedes are generally nice, friendly people, just typically less outgoing than many other cultures.[5] As such, Swedes tend to be somewhat wary around unknown people, and it can be difficult for foreigners and immigrants to assimilate in Sweden.[5][6] At the same time, Swedes are well known for their tolerance and appreciation of other cultures.[7] Many people have noticed a dramatic difference between winter Swedes and summer Swedes, because people's moods tend to be affected by the cold, dark winters.[8] One misconception is that Sweden and the Swedes are overly[citation needed] permissive regarding sex and nudism. This misconception may be due to Sweden's early legalization of pornography and early implementation of sex education in school.[citation needed] These days, Sweden is not very tolerant of the sex industry.[citation needed] Paying for a sex worker's services is illegal and pornography is seen as oppressive and degrading, particularly to women[citation needed], by most leading politicians.[citation needed]

Many Swedes enjoy hiking as well as using nature for various forms of exercise and/or recreation, such as picking berries and mushrooms or hunting.[7] Possibly as a result of Allemansrätten [9], the right of public access to the wilderness, allowing almost free access to nature even on private property. For Swedes, taking a walk in the woods is not unlike a visit to church.[7]

As elsewhere in Scandinavia, Swedes often take pride in having an average social standing. If you are rich you often don't show it off in a manner that looks out of the ordinary and you often downplay it when talking about it. If you have a large house in the archipelago you may say that you have "A house a bit outside town."[7] Lagom is a Swedish word that lacks a counterpart in most languages. It basically means "just the right amount, but not too much." This explains the Swedish desire to live a normal, pleasant life. Elitism is often frowned upon, and Swedes speak of Jantelagen and Swedish jealousy as norms which keep people in their place, even though these norms have become slightly more lax in recent years. Egalitarianism remains a strong ideal in Sweden. Swedes prefer a polite yet casual form of interaction, without strict rules dividing social groups. It is perfectly normal to greet your boss or teacher using first name or nickname.[7]

Since for the larger part of the year the weather is wet in one way or another Swedes remove their shoes when visiting somebody. If it's a more formal occasion you bring indoor shoes with you in a bag and change.[7]

Throughout the 1960s and 1970s Sweden was an international leader in what is now referred to as the sexual revolution, with gender equality particularly promoted during this time.[8]

Physically, Swedes are often stereotyped as being tall, beautiful and blonde; with strikingly fair complexions; long, thick, blond hair; green or blue eyes; and a generally elegant disposition. As with most stereotypes, this one is somewhat inaccurate; just under 50% of Swedes are naturally blonde with another 25% having light brown hair (which is a relatively high rate of blonde and light brown hair compared to the United States or other Germanic speaking countries such as England), plenty are not lean but not overweight, and the Lapps in the north of Sweden have dark hair and eye colour (though many would not consider them to be "ethnic Swedish").


[edit] Alcohol
Main article: Alcoholic beverages in Sweden
Sweden is located in the vodka belt and drinking was a problem until the temperance movement gained influence. Swedes now rarely drink alcohol during the work week, but instead binge drink during the weekends, although drinking habits have become more 'continental' in recent decades.[7] As such many Swedes tend to become much more outgoing on the weekends. To prevent excessive drinking, alcohol sales are handled by a government monopoly, Systembolaget, who impose a high sales tax. The high cost of alcohol, which is even higher in pubs and restaurants, has led to the tradition of grunda (building a foundation), fökröka ("pre-drinking") or fövärma ("pre-heat"), i.e. gathering at home and drinking before going out.

some average swedes
http://img135.imageshack.us/img135/1096/swedes0nb.jpg

Blahhh bimbos

WN_Barbarossa
08-31-2007, 06:08 AM
BTW There's an old pic about cultural differences between Europe and the USA:

http://pizdaus.com/pics/epKN1g1fY5Uz.jpg (http://pizdaus.com)

Jutocsa
08-31-2007, 06:15 AM
Originally posted by WN_Barbarossa:

Alans? Here in Hungary? Are you sure? I thought they lived in Ossetia.



Check Jazyg or Jassig (Jász) people, they are alans for example.




Well, I can't agree with this. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif



Cant ? Check a random history book, or the recent political situation http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

joeap
08-31-2007, 06:35 AM
I am culturally confused. Canadian, son of Greek immigrants (themselves actually from Egypt and the once large community there) I now live in Geneva, the most international small city in gthe world. I work with about 30 nationalites work at a research foundation...and my Uni was similarly diverse. My friends include everyone but Canadians btw. I know people from each continent.

Phil_K
08-31-2007, 07:06 AM
Originally posted by fabianfred:
When i was in the British army I spent seven years in Germany.....a lovely country...great food and nice people.... but they love to live by the letter of the law....and love uniforms too

In England the rules of the road can basically be summed-up by the phrase "giving way"..... if an accident happens on the road in germany....someone has broken a law....no question

Actually, from what I understand, the law of England gives the pedestrian right of way over ALL vehicles. Basically, the road is the "public highway", and any other vehicle is there by grace only (which is why cars and lorries have to pay a tax for the privilege of using the road).

Of course this situation is usually ignored for:

i) economic reasons, and
ii) the fact that vehicles tend to be bigger, faster and harder than human bodies.

BGs_Ricky
08-31-2007, 07:12 AM
Originally posted by joeap:
I am culturally confused. Canadian, son of Greek immigrants (themselves actually from Egypt and the once large community there) I now live in Geneva, the most international small city in gthe world. I work with about 30 nationalites work at a research foundation...and my Uni was similarly diverse. My friends include everyone but Canadians btw. I know people from each continent.

Hey, we don't live very far, I'm in Lausanne http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

TheVoodooPriest
08-31-2007, 07:40 AM
This link contains some interesting interviews concerning this topic.

Americans and Germans: Close encounters of the cross-cultural kind:
http://langlab.uta.edu/german/personal/rings/Americans.And.Germans/toc.html

Although not quite up to date, most of the observations are still valid.

WN_Barbarossa
08-31-2007, 08:06 AM
Originally posted by Jutocsa:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WN_Barbarossa:

Well, I can't agree with this. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif



Cant ? Check a random history book, or the recent political situation http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Okay, it was a joke. If I agree with you, that hungarians always disagree, I prove you wrong, because I'm also a hungarian. So, while I basically agree with you, that hungarians always disagree, I had to write the opposite to confirm your theory, which I agree with.

I think it's clear now. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif

Blutarski2004
08-31-2007, 08:08 AM
Originally posted by WN_Barbarossa:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Jutocsa:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WN_Barbarossa:

Well, I can't agree with this. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif



Cant ? Check a random history book, or the recent political situation http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Okay, it was a joke. If I agree with you, that hungarians always disagree, I prove you wrong, because I'm also a hungarian. So, while I basically agree with you, that hungarians always disagree, I had to write the opposite to confirm your theory, which I agree with.

I think it's clear now. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


........ :-] ..........

AKA_TAGERT
08-31-2007, 08:13 AM
Originally posted by Aimail101:
http://img135.imageshack.us/img135/1096/swedes0nb.jpg
The chick in the yellow shirt..

Been there done that

BGs_Ricky
08-31-2007, 08:15 AM
The bald one gets my vote http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Ratsack
08-31-2007, 08:22 AM
Originally posted by Bewolf:
...
Baffling, similiar to the Us, is the amount of liberites pushed away in the name of security. Considering The US and Britian having been a role model in civil rights and human rights in former times, they now serve as an axample of exxegerated paranoia, willing to shove away centuries of achivements in fear of terror attacks. Big brother is watching you comes to mind everytime its about Britian or the US. Though there are similar tendencies in Germany, as of now nothing of that magnitute came into effect here, which I consider very lucky. I rather take the risk of beeing killed in a terrorist attackk nowdays (which is far less then the risk of beeing killed in a car accident) to preserve what countless generations and millions of people died for in former times.

I agree. We're doing the same thing here, in Australia, all in the name of the GWOT. It's frankly appalling. Centuries of common law, overturned without a whimper.

cheers,
Ratsack

Jutocsa
08-31-2007, 08:49 AM
Originally posted by WN_Barbarossa:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Jutocsa:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WN_Barbarossa:

Well, I can't agree with this. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif



Cant ? Check a random history book, or the recent political situation http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Okay, it was a joke. If I agree with you, that hungarians always disagree, I prove you wrong, because I'm also a hungarian. So, while I basically agree with you, that hungarians always disagree, I had to write the opposite to confirm your theory, which I agree with.

I think it's clear now. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Oh ****, you got me http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

lowfighter
08-31-2007, 10:18 AM
I find the westerners taking overall too much care about their health. Impression I got during several years of Physics research in Germany, Switzerland and Israel, a fantastic oportunity to get close to people from many many countries. Here's a pretty funny illustration (it's somewhat extreme). Hiking in the Swiss Alps, our group consisting of Swiss, Germans, Italians,one Romanian (me). We are very very thirsty after a while, all water consumed, suddenly we stumble over a brook. As I rush towards it, everybody's trying to stop me because " you don't know if this water is ok, there's no (Swiss) inscription saying it's ok to drink it blabla". I drunk it of course, it was MOUNTAIN BROOK water for God sake.

And what's the life good if you're all the time afraid about this and that little thing which might damage you? I'm exagerating a bit but the tendency is there.

Bewolf
08-31-2007, 10:46 AM
Originally posted by lowfighter:
I find the westerners taking overall too much care about their health. Impression I got during several years of Physics research in Germany, Switzerland and Israel, a fantastic oportunity to get close to people from many many countries. Here's a pretty funny illustration (it's somewhat extreme). Hiking in the Swiss Alps, our group consisting of Swiss, Germans, Italians,one Romanian (me). We are very very thirsty after a while, all water consumed, suddenly we stumble over a brook. As I rush towards it, everybody's trying to stop me because " you don't know if this water is ok, there's no (Swiss) inscription saying it's ok to drink it blabla". I drunk it of course, it was MOUNTAIN BROOK water for God sake.

And what's the life good if you're all the time afraid about this and that little thing which might damage you? I'm exagerating a bit but the tendency is there.


http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

Plelv44_Mangrov
08-31-2007, 10:49 AM
I live in Finland. Finland is quite different when compared to other Nordic countries and East Europe. Although Finland shares history with Sweden there isn't much common with these two countries.

Throughout the history Finland has been been alone or done the dirty work for others. This has shaped the Finns in a way that I think is unique in whole Europe.

For example: One have to chop wood for the winter (almost every house in Finland has an oven). Buying them from store is pitiful. A true Finn go to the forest and cut down own his / her's trees. No help is asked.

lowfighter
08-31-2007, 11:14 AM
Originally posted by Plelv44_Mangrov:
For example: One have to chop wood for the winter (almost every house in Finland has an oven). Buying them from store is pitiful. A true Finn go to the forest and cut down own his / her's trees. No help is asked.

That's cool M8! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

tagTaken2
09-01-2007, 12:35 AM
Originally posted by TheVoodooPriest:
This link contains some interesting interviews concerning this topic.

Americans and Germans: Close encounters of the cross-cultural kind:
http://langlab.uta.edu/german/personal/rings/Americans.And.Germans/toc.html


I was thinking about moving to Germany, and did a bit of reading on the net for migrant experiences... I've seen these, and with other stuff I've read, it makes me wonder if I wasn't born in the wrong country. I'm sure that when I get there, it won't be perfect, but... it seems a great deal more mature than Australia. There was a very amusing article about a Walmart attempt in Germany... they had to setup a special academy to teach German shop assistants to be "friendly"... and I believe it tanked, because that wasn't what German consumers wanted, or needed.
Don't get me wrong about Australia, there's a lot to love here, I just wonder if we've lost the things that made us unique in the last decade.

cawimmer430
09-01-2007, 02:28 PM
Originally posted by MB_Avro_UK:

When I visited Munich a couple of years ago my girlfriend crossed the street when the the light was Red for pedestrians.There were no cars approaching so she crossed the street.

Many of the people waiting 'tut-tutted' and expressed their annoyance. In England (Britain) this is not a problem.


They were just signaling you that they thought you're girlfriend is hot and that you're lucky to have her. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif