PDA

View Full Version : OT: Norwegian - english translation lessons.



tjaika1910
05-26-2006, 02:59 AM
1.) Engelsk for begynnere: (English for beginners)

Norwegian: Tre hekser ser p¥ tre Swatch klokker. Hvilken heks ser p¥ hvilken Swatch klokke?


English: Three witches watch three Swatch watches. Which witch watch which Swatch watch?


2.) Next step, advanced English:


Norwegian: Tre kj¸nnsopererte hekser ser p¥ knappene p¥ tre Swatch klokker. Hvilken kj¸nnsoperert heks ser p¥ hvilken Swatch-klokkeknapp?


English: Three switched witches watch three Swatch watch switches. Which switched witch watch which Swatch watch switch?


3.) Expert English:


Norwegian: Tre sveitsiske hekse-tisper, som ¸nsker ¥ v¦re kj¸nnsopererte sveitsiske hekse-tisper, ¸nsker ¥ se p¥ sveitsiske Swatch-klokkeknapper. Hvilken sveitsisk hekse-tispe, som ¸nsker ¥ v¦re en kj¸nnsoperert sveitsisk hekse-tispe, ¸nsker ¥ se p¥ hvilken sveitsisk Swatch-klokkeknapp?


English: Three Swiss witch-*****es, which wished to be switched Swiss witch *****es, wish to watch three swiss Swatch watch switches. Which Swiss witch ***** which wishes to be a switched Swiss witch-*****, wishes to watch which Swiss Swatch watch switch?

RAF_Loke
05-26-2006, 03:07 AM
LMAO http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Porsimo
05-26-2006, 03:52 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

danjama
05-26-2006, 03:54 AM
This place CAN be educational at times! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Friendly_flyer
05-26-2006, 05:48 AM
This of coerce proves that Norwegian is the superior language of the two, and should replace English as a standard language of international communication. The people of the world could communicate in peace and harmony, free from misunderstanding...


... all 4 million of us.


... oh, and Ballrog.

Hurri-Khan
05-26-2006, 06:51 AM
Very educational! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Want to try basic finnish then ??

1. Ӟl¤ r¤¤kk¤¤ k¤¤kk¤¤! No eh¤ m¤¤ r¤¤kk¤¤kk¤¤. (Don't torture that old bird! But I'm not torturing!)
2. Kokko, kokoo koko kokko kokoon! Koko kokkoko? Koko kokko.
(Kokko, collect the whole balefire up! The whole balefire? The whole balefire.)
3. K¶yli¶l¤inen y¶ty¶l¤inen.
(Night-shift worker from K¶yli¶.)
4. Alavilla mailla hallanvaara.
(Frost danger on low lands.)
5. Vesihiisi sihisi hississ¤.
(Water pixie hissed in the elevator.)
6. Riiuuy¶aie.
(A slightly dated expression for an intention to hit a woman for night. The word with the most vowels on the trot in the world.)
7. "Tule varovasti", sanoi tuleva rovasti. ("Come carefully" said the dean.)
8. Onkiva rovasti on kiva rovasti koska onki varovasti.
(Fishing dean is a nice dean because he fished carefully.)
9. Yksiksesk¶s itkeskelet, itseksesk¶s yskiskelet?
(Are you crying alone, coughing by yourself?)
10. Vahva talous-, vero- ja ty¶llisyysstrategia, yhteiskunnallista tasa-arvoa ajava ja sosiaalista eheytt¤ edist¤v¤ uudistuspolitiikka ovat 2000-luvun alun ilmentym¤ sille poliittiselle yhteisty¶n perinteelle, jolla maatamme on mennein¤ vuosikymmenin¤ kehitetty. (A strong economic, tax and employment strategy, and reform policies which foster societal equality and social integrity, are a beginning-of-the-21st-century expression of the tradition of political co-operation that has been the foundation of our country's development during the past decades)
11. Ӟ¤kk¶set eiv¤t ole ongelma.
(Umlauts are not a problem.)
12. Ӟl¤ ly¶, ¤¤li¶! ¶li¤ l¤ikkyy.
(Don't hit, you moron! The beer is splashing.)
13. Kolmivaihekilowattituntimittari (three-phased kWh counter)
14. Ep¤j¤rjestelm¤llistytt¤m¤tt¶myydell¤ ¤ns¤k¤¤nk¶h¤nk¤¤n (I wonder if even with his, her or it's ability not to disorganize things.)
15. Kumarreksituteskenteleentuvaisehkollaismaisekkuude llisenneskenteluttelemattomammuuksissansakkaankopa han (45th longest word in Finland. The translation is in progress. It is expected to be finished by the year 2145.)

more: http://uncyclopedia.org/wiki/Didarasq

>>>-H-K--->

tjaika1910
05-26-2006, 08:42 AM
kokko kokko http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

lmao

tHeBaLrOgRoCkS
05-26-2006, 02:37 PM
LMAO

Ja du er riktig! Jeg verstore Norsk litt, men jeg kan ser at der er m¥ jeg m¥ lare!

Jeg can agso snakker litt finsk men jeg bare vert stygg ord p¥ finsk!

Not to mention that my spelling and grammer are attrocious http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif

Finnish now there is a language to keep the manufacturers of alphabetti spagetti in business

icrash
05-26-2006, 10:58 PM
If I can figure out where some scans are, would you be interested in translating them from Norwegian to English? They came from my dad's side of the family (both his parents are Norwegians). I think one of the scans has to do with the ship they came over on but don't hold me to that.

Hurri-Khan
05-27-2006, 03:22 AM
Originally posted by tHeBaLrOgRoCkS:
LMAO

Ja du er riktig! Jeg verstore Norsk litt, men jeg kan ser at der er m¥ jeg m¥ lare!

Jeg can agso snakker litt finsk men jeg bare vert stygg ord p¥ finsk!

Not to mention that my spelling and grammer are attrocious http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif

Finnish now there is a language to keep the manufacturers of alphabetti spagetti in business

Even with my poor swedish I can understand bits of norwegian.. but like they say ;
"A foreigner can speak Finnish fluently after a mere 60 years of teaching and training. Another 60 years and the foreigner will be able to write Finnish as well. During the first days/weeks/months/years of studying the foreigner quickly learns his first Finnish word that has an incredible 100% chance of being "Perkele" for the relative ease of learning the language."
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

>>>-H-K--->

tjaika1910
05-27-2006, 04:47 AM
Originally posted by icrash:
If I can figure out where some scans are, would you be interested in translating them from Norwegian to English? They came from my dad's side of the family (both his parents are Norwegians). I think one of the scans has to do with the ship they came over on but don't hold me to that.

I'll see what I can do...

WWMaxGunz
05-27-2006, 05:03 AM
I had a friend of Norwegian blood who used to point out many many examples of Norwegian
word bases, structure and use in English. And German parts in English as well. There
is really much Norse and German is English that , LOL, keeps us from speaking backwards.
We say 'close the door' instead of 'the door close' but still it is not completely out
to do the latter just it is more awkward speaking and IMO thinking.

tHeBaLrOgRoCkS
05-27-2006, 05:20 AM
Originally posted by Hurri-Khan:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by tHeBaLrOgRoCkS:
LMAO

Ja du er riktig! Jeg verstore Norsk litt, men jeg kan ser at der er m¥ jeg m¥ lare!

Jeg can agso snakker litt finsk men jeg bare vert stygg ord p¥ finsk!

Not to mention that my spelling and grammer are attrocious http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif

Finnish now there is a language to keep the manufacturers of alphabetti spagetti in business

Even with my poor swedish I can understand bits of norwegian.. but like they say ;
"A foreigner can speak Finnish fluently after a mere 60 years of teaching and training. Another 60 years and the foreigner will be able to write Finnish as well. During the first days/weeks/months/years of studying the foreigner quickly learns his first Finnish word that has an incredible 100% chance of being "Perkele" for the relative ease of learning the language."
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

>>>-H-K---> </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Lol yup thats what I learned but I also know 'mersu piloti' although I am not totaly sure of the spelling?

Max is right though lots of Norsk words have made it into the english language sh1t being the most famous I guess although it has a less impact there than it does outside of Norway.

Barn (child) is very similar sounding to 'bairn' a common term amongst my family.

Would be interesting to see the scans, there are at least two norsk versions spoken in Norway and I would guess your letters will be in old norwegian as a posed to new norwegian.

icrash
05-27-2006, 07:57 AM
Cool, I appreciate any help. The original name was Larson but there were so many Larsons at the Gap, the post office made them change their last name. Good news is I found them, bad news is the condition of the originals. The documents are hard to read because they were put onto a plaque then coated with a clear varnish or something. Here are the 3 best ones

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/icrash/norscan4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/icrash/norscan2.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/icrash/norscan3.jpg

Friendly_flyer
05-27-2006, 09:50 AM
Lemme€ seee:

My comments in brackets. The English is a bit funny as I have tried to translate it as close to original wording as possible.

1. Page:

Contract (I guess you found than one out)
between
White Star Line (the Norwegian is old fashion, more like Danish)
and below passengers for fright
to Clifford, Texas (is that right?) for (Kr., abbreviation for Kroner (Crowns) replaces with $C)

Next columns read €œName€ and €œAge€, then, there€s a guarantee from the fright company:

I, Ferdinand J. Eldster (rather well known Norwegian family), General Agent for White Star Line, hereby take on the duty of transporting the above persons from here to the destination for the above sum, which I acknowledge to have received as full payment.
1. With steamship in middle deck.
from€¦.. to€¦€¦.(not filled in)
2. With railway from there to Liverpool
3. With steamship in the middle deck to New York or Boston
3. With railway from New York or Boston to the destination
(sign)

Below the ornamental border:
Shown at police station (or rather chamber), date, sign
(Back then, travelling abroad required a police permit. It was more of a formality in the early 20th century, but up to 1862, any person travelling in Norway needed a passport, including Norwegians)

icrash
05-27-2006, 10:29 AM
Cool, thanks for the assist. Yes, it is Clifford, Tx. They eventually settled in Cranfills Gap, Bosque County, Texas. That area is bigtime Norwegian.

Friendly_flyer
05-27-2006, 10:33 AM
Second and third page:

This is not part of the ticket, but vaccination certificates for smallpox. All forms of pox is known as €œkopper€ (cups) in Norwegian. As can easily be seen from the font, they where printed a good deal earlier that the ticket. The language is medical Norwegian, and is rather old fashion.

Kr 120,- (this was a lot of money back then)
Cow-pox inoculation attest (inoculation was originally done by smearing cow-pox matter into a small scalpel-cut.)
€¦€¦.. (The name is difficult to read)
born in ............ by parents €¦
€¦€¦€¦€¦€¦€¦€¦€¦ ¦€¦€¦.
and living in €¦€¦€¦€¦€¦....
€¦€¦€¦€¦€¦€¦€¦€¦ ¦€¦€¦ (years) old, is by me, the signer, year
€¦€¦€¦, the €¦€¦€¦ inoculated with cow-pox, With care-
full followup between the 7th and 9th day after the inoculation
have I found all such marks, that show them to be proper cow-
pox: They where namely whole and €œnot hard to the touch€ (in one word), filled with a clear
liquid, in the middle depressed, and surrounded by a red circle.
€¦€¦€¦€¦€¦€¦€¦€¦ ¦€¦..
have thoroughly checked the real cow-pox, that protects
for children-pox; which hereby on honour and conscience,
is witnessed by
€¦€¦€¦€¦€¦.., the (8th of October), year (1892 or 1893)

Bremspropeller
05-27-2006, 11:42 AM
Your mom

DuxCorvan
05-27-2006, 12:48 PM
Spanish:

Si yo como como como y tu comes como comes, ¿C³mo comes como como, si yo como como como?
(If I eat the way I eat, and you eat the way you eat, how can you eat the way you eat, if I eat the way I eat?)

El amor es una locura que ni el cura lo cura, y si el cura lo cura, es una locura de cura.
(Love is a mad thing that the priest can't cure, and if the priest can cure, is a mad thing of a priest.)

El tomatero Matute mat³ al matutero Mota porque Mota el matutero tom³ de su tomatera un tomate. Por eso, por un tomate, mat³ el tomatero Matute al matutero Mota. (Tomato planter Matute killed smuggler Mota, because Mota the smuggler stole from his tomato plant a tomato. Because of that, for a tomato killed tomato planter Matute smuggler Mota.)

And how about palindromes?

Dábale arroz a la zorra el abad. (The abbot gave the fox rice.)

Eva usaba Rimel y le miraba suave. (Eve used eyeshadow and looked tenderly at him.)

Se corta Sarita a tiras atroces. (Little Sara cuts herself to atrocious strips.)

Anita, la gorda lagartona, no traga la droga latina. (Annie the fat ****, can't swallow the Latin drug.)

icrash
05-27-2006, 03:38 PM
Big thanks for the assist Flyer. I kinda figured the first had something to do with their passage to the U.S. but wasn't sure. I had no clue as to what the other to were. Now I can add this info to the famly tree stuff I'm compiling w/ credit to you for the translations http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

tjaika1910
05-27-2006, 03:52 PM
Nice friendly flyer. I didnt see this till now, I would have big difficulties with the gothic letters. Dont think the 120 is the pay though, but a reference number. Also the doctors notes seems to be a lot older that the White Star ticket.

Btw: wasnt White Start the company for Titanic?

Hurri-Khan
05-28-2006, 02:29 AM
Seems so..

http://www.titanic-whitestarships.com/

>>>-H-K--->

Friendly_flyer
05-28-2006, 04:55 AM
Originally posted by DuxCorvan:

Si yo como como como y tu comes como comes, ¿C³mo comes como como, si yo como como como?
(If I eat the way I eat, and you eat the way you eat, how can you eat the way you eat, if I eat the way I eat?)

My Spanish wife asks if the 2nd sentence should read "¿C³mo comes como comes, si yo ..." I woulden't know anyway, me espaol aun es muy malo...

Friendly_flyer
05-28-2006, 05:09 AM
Originally posted by tjaika1910:
Dont think the 120 is the pay though, but a reference number. Also the doctors notes seems to be a lot older that the White Star ticket.

You may be right. According to Norwegian Statistics Agency, 120 crowns of 1892 would be 6936 crowns by today, or about 1050 dollar. This seems a tad over the top for a vaccine. The funny squiggle in front of 120 may be "Kr" (standard abbreviation for "Kroner") or it may be "No" or even "Nr". The only thing indicating otherwise is that the two certificates bear the same number.

I haven't figured out the other handwriting either, Icrash probably know who they where, though. As far as I can see, they came from Northern Odalen, a place not too far from Oslo.

icrash
05-28-2006, 08:04 PM
OK I managed to find the family tree stuff. The certificate with the 120,if I'm reading all this right is Pauline Stenbekken Larson, my great grandmother (born in 1871). The certificate is hard to read, but with Flyer saying Odalen I'm pretty sure this is her. I have her as born in Hedemarken, Nord-Odol, Norway.
The other certificate, again barely legible, is Olaf Albert Langseth (born 1871 or 1872), my great grandfather.
The scan that is the contract is from when Olaf came over from Norway. The history says he came over with wife & 4 kids. Olaf & Pauline are my grandmother's parents.
On the Rohne side, great grandfather was born 1870 in Frydenlund Romedal Parish, Hedemarken County, Norway. This is according to his autobiography.
Again, thanks for all the help in deciphering part of the family tree. Some of it actually making sense now (at least I know what I'm looking at now).

Friendly_flyer
05-29-2006, 12:08 AM
Ah, it says Pauline, I was wondering about that! The certificates are bout issued by the same doctor, bout say €œOdalen€, which is in Hedemark, North of Oslo. Odalen is a bit of a backwater with run-down farms, dens, dark spruce forest and winding roads. My family sometimes drives through when going to our cottage when there€s indigestion on the main road north.

The ticket is issued for 7 persons.

The first is Olaf Larsen, age 34. (could that have been a misspelling for Langseth? Bouth are common Norwegian names, and I think the writing was done by the seller).
The second may be Stina or Lina Larsen (the little squiggle is very clearly a €œrepeat above€), age 34 (again common Norwegina names), anyway it€s definitely not Pauline.

However, bout have their age given as 34. If we assume they where born in 1871, it indicates they left the year of Norwegian independence from Sweden, 1905. The document is issued sometimes between 1900 and 1909, but the year has not been filled in.

Third is Karl Olien (?) which may have been a farm hand as he is 22.

Fourth is Pauline Larsen, age 11. To me it looks like she€s the daughter of Olaf, she is most definitely not his wife.

The rest are toddlers, one unreadable, Oscar and Lydia.

This has gone thoroughly of-topic, sorry about that.