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Nick_Toznost
09-28-2005, 02:44 AM
Why is there a plentiful supply of bananas aboard the U-Boats? I don't think the British saw one single banana until 1944. They famously don't grow in Europe.

I think my point is:

Were there banana carrying merchants going to Germany?, or did Ubisoft randomly pick an item of fruit to go in the canteen section, when perhaps blackberries or something may have been more appropriate.
I would have thought that the Third Reich had more important things to import. Is there any historical documentation of the Royal Navy sinking a cargo of Reich-bound bananas?

I am being rather silly and pedantic, I know. Just something that occured to me.

Baldricks_Mate
09-28-2005, 02:59 AM
Work all night on a drink a'rum
Daylight come and he wan' go home
Stack banana till thee morning come
Daylight come and he wan' go home
day-ay-ay-o
Come, Mr. Tally Mon, tally me banana
Daylight come and he wan' go home

***Oh Yeah, Mr Belafonte!!! Yo tha Man!!!***

That is what the type IX's bring home on the return journey...swap straight ones for bent ones.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Nick_Toznost
09-28-2005, 04:48 AM
Ever tried drinking a bottle of Navy Rum and listening to that tune?. Seems to transform into the best song ever written.

The_Silent_O
09-28-2005, 05:54 AM
"Yes, we have no bananas, we have no bananas, Todaaaaaay!" (imagine, U-bootmen dancing and singing vaudville like in the forward torpedo room)

I think the answer is here...

Spain's other significant orchard crops were apples, bananas, pears, peaches, apricots, plums, cherries, figs, and nuts. Except for bananas, which were grown only in the Canary Islands, and figs, which were grown mostly in the Balearic Islands, orchard crops were produced primarily in the Levante and in Catalonia. The Catalan province of Lerida was the leading producer of apples and pears, and it ranked second to Murcia in the production of peaches. Almonds, grown along the southern and the eastern coasts, emerged as another important Spanish cash crop. Almost half of the 1985 crop was exported, approximately 70 to 75 percent of it to EC countries.


Espana (http://countrystudies.us/spain/58.htm)

who said spain was neutral, huh?

But still perplexing is the Spain's banana crop in only grown in the Canary Islands...? So those bananas in the u-boat have traveled far!

W.Irving
09-28-2005, 06:05 AM
Ohh shocker! Spain trading with the axis! Know where the Germans bought the ore for their Tigers? Sweden, of course!
+ The Canary Islands aren't that far away really.

Germany's merchant raiders reached as far away as Australia (btw, why the flip would they have to attack allied shipping in the southern hemisphere at all!?), so the likelyhood of them also having regular refrigerated merchant ships carrying bananas from South America shouldn't be too small.

Taggy-Waggy
09-28-2005, 08:48 AM
You guys know Bananas on board brings bad luck! On sailing ships, before fridges it was actually forbidden to bring bananas. It's just a superstition, however it might have some truth.
Bananas produce gasses, like some other fruits, which make other things ripe and rot faster than usual. And on sailing trips, you don't want your lemons or oranges to rot. (no fresh fruits --> vitamin C deficiency --> scurvy --> death.)
and i actually almost died by an aircraft attack while i was getting a banana in the kitchen some hours ago.
NO bananas on board!

google on bananas + superstition

http://espn.go.com/outdoors/fishing/s/f_fea_superstition.html

W.Irving
09-28-2005, 09:25 AM
Ethylene gas. Almost all fruits and vegetables produce it. It aids the ripening process. Cargo ships transporting bananas around the world must ventilate the ethylene gas in order for the bananas to remain green at arrival.

That is why you should not keep bananas in the same bowl as apples and pears, and one of the reasons tomatoes are best stored outside of the fridge.

Gunnersman
09-28-2005, 09:42 AM
Originally posted by W.Irving:
Ethylene gas. Almost all fruits and vegetables produce it. It aids the ripening process. Cargo ships transporting bananas around the world must ventilate the ethylene gas in order for the bananas to remain green at arrival.

That is why you should not keep bananas in the same bowl as apples and pears, and one of the reasons tomatoes are best stored outside of the fridge.

I did not know that. I fount of information you folks are. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Dominicrigg
09-28-2005, 10:31 AM
The next compartment held the petty officers' quarters and the tiny galley. The cook had just a three-ring range, two small ovens and a 40 litre boiling pot, but meals were surprisingly good and their quality helped to take the edge off the hardship of life on board. The German soldier in teh field would have been amazed by the variety of sausages, smoked meats, cheeses, vegetables and fruit stowed in every nook and cranny of a front-line U-boat. There were also special items: chocolate and good coffee. It did not last of course - everything was damp. There was always somethng dripping on a U-boat, such as a leaky housing or valve, and in this close, fetid environment the food began to gather a film of green mould within days. By the second week the bread was cut from tins and so, by the third, was the meat.

No mention of bananas but yes you are right they were slow to get to Britain. I think the guys for das boot did their research well though and in that film there were bananas on board!

Interesting facts from everyone!

Kaleun1961
09-28-2005, 01:17 PM
Originally posted by W.Irving:
Ohh shocker! Spain trading with the axis! Know where the Germans bought the ore for their Tigers? Sweden, of course!
+ The Canary Islands aren't that far away really.

Germany's merchant raiders reached as far away as Australia (btw, why the flip would they have to attack allied shipping in the southern hemisphere at all!?), so the likelyhood of them also having regular refrigerated merchant ships carrying bananas from South America shouldn't be too small.

While Donitz would have preferred to sink ships that were inbound with war supplies, to him it ultimately did not matter where they were sunk, as long as Britain and the Allies had another ship sunk from their collective pool of shipping assets. A tanker sunk in the south would have to be replaced by a tanker from perhaps the north, it had to come from somewhere.

Dominicrigg
09-28-2005, 04:34 PM
Supplies, men and equipment were inbound from africa and australia also. Thats why they were sinking them. There was also the fact they were trying a little to help out Japan, their allies.

Nick_Toznost
09-28-2005, 05:46 PM
Wow, I love this forum. I stand corrected. I am a fan of Das Boot, don't remember the bananas but I suppose that wasn't the point of the film.
I'm always telling my fiance not to put bananas in with other fruit, now I have stacks of evidence.

Thanks everyone.

Nick_Toznost
10-05-2005, 10:36 AM
Just watched "Das Boot" for the second time (first time was before I'd ever played a sub sim) and yes, they pick up bananas in a spanish port.
Great film, shows how accurate SH3 is. It would be nice to see more of the sub in the game though. The engine room looks amazing in that film.
Such a bleak ending.


Anyway thats all my banana related questions answered.

Dominicrigg
10-05-2005, 12:49 PM
My memory is better then i thought http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Ages since i saw it. Phew.

The_Silent_O
10-05-2005, 08:06 PM
Originally posted by Nick_Toznost:
Just watched "Das Boot" for the second time (first time was before I'd ever played a sub sim) and yes, they pick up bananas in a spanish port.
Great film, shows how accurate SH3 is. It would be nice to see more of the sub in the game though. The engine room looks amazing in that film.
Such a bleak ending.


Anyway thats all my banana related questions answered.

Bleak! We got the sub!

A little too dramatic for me...but it made a good story. I thought it all ironic that they made it through all that hell at sea, just to be sunk at there 'safe' port!

...I wonder if anybody salvaged the bananas that sunk with the sub...they were hard to come by in wartime france.