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View Full Version : O.T. That's it! I want to fly a real plane!



domenlovrec
03-24-2007, 06:06 PM
I was driving in a bus and it hit me. I realy want to fly but i allways thought this is only for few chosen people.

I'm only 19, student, but from what i have read age shouldn't be a problem. Until now i was like: naah, gliders are stupid i wanna fly jet fighter. But i changed my mind http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif. I know there are real pilots on this forum so my question is: how it's like to fly a glider?

So this is the airfield:

http://www.aeroklub-lj.si/gal/jadr-gal/bovec6.jpg

But i problems with budget... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif I have to pay around 400€ for theory test and then i need 40-45 hours of flying (one hour is 30€). This is way too much for me right now but few optimistic words from you guys would help me (to work more and whine less http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif).

SithSpeeder
03-24-2007, 07:11 PM
Do it!

* _54th_Speeder *

***
Do or do not. There is no try.
--Yoda
***

Sjeler
03-24-2007, 08:09 PM
I want too! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I was looking around to see how much pilot training would cost like and I found out its too much for my budget but there is one sentence on flight school page that got me interested. It says: during introductory flight (which costs 20€) where you get to know plane etc, you will be given control over plane for couple of minutes. Yay! I can't wait to see instructor's reaction when I ask him if I may do Immelman or split-s http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Insuber
03-25-2007, 03:49 AM
It's beatiful! And if you want it cheaper, go for hang gliders, the flight experience is even more intense. The only drawback is that you've to purchase the hanglider in the end, but then the running costs are lower. When I was 21 I bought a second hand hang glider, with my (late)grandfather's help ... the best period of my life ... and moreover you'll find WONDERFUL PEOPLE flying with you.

Do it and you won't regret, despite the sacrifices you'll have to do.

Insuber

Ugly_Kid
03-25-2007, 04:14 AM
Originally posted by domenlovrec:
I'm only 19, student, but from what i have read age shouldn't be a problem. Until now i was like: naah, gliders are stupid i wanna fly jet fighter. But i changed my mind http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif. I know there are real pilots on this forum so my question is: how it's like to fly a glider?


IMO the only real flying takes place in a glider. When I was doing it I noticed that you have certain priviledges. In a simplified form piloting a powered aircraft is from moving from place A to B. You get to exercise procedures and emergencies to control the box that makes bang in front of the aircraft pushing it forward that's that - but the flying part...unless you get to aerobatics I think you're limited.

Now gliding, you want to make it from point A to B, you'll have to know quite a bit and get experience and still there is no quarantee that Weather God's are playing ball. That is however the attraction, it is about flying pure, the good, really good, manage 1500 km in a good day.

You also get more freedom from airtraffic controllers 'cause you can't say exactly how long it will take you to fly a route and best part - everyone except the balloons have to mind you.

You can do aerobatics, in fact you come to that point much faster than in a powered aircraft. The glider is tossed around much more so you have to be in a position to recover from obscure attitudes, a fundamental thing to aerobatics. You can exercise instrumental flying, climbing into the clouds in a thermal using only turn and slip indicator and sooner you know you'll be exiting the cloud inverted http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif. It is hilarious flying in a thermal and once you've reached cloud bottom convert the thermal into speed by maintaining altitude. Sooner you notice you have 200 km/h on the clock and some 4 g on the neck and then you just sling out of the thermal fly under the cloud bottom the rudder cutting into the cloud and after reaching the cloud border pull up zooming some 100 m above cloud bottom - then you're flying between clouds http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif - Flying pure, this you won't experience in any other aircraft.

However, a word of warning - it will take all your time, it will be all or nothing. It is hard work and you need to get along with different people on the airfield and in the club. There is strict hierarchy there. So social skills are prerequisite. Sometimes older guys starting it, don't get it and younger one have too many other interests to get really focused on that one thing. A doctor of medicine does not want to suppress himself listening a construction worker giving him a b0llocking for flying like a bottle-arsed svine, but I think it is the same in very many other extreme sports as well.

NAFP_supah
03-25-2007, 05:00 AM
You can always join a flying club, nobody expects you to attain your license as fast as possible, atleast not in the one I am in. Being a member is a good way to meet people who have the same interest and often you can tag along on their flights if their going out alone.

About the only real flying being done in gliders .... PFRST. Sure sailplane flying teaches you alot about coordinated flight and I have noticed that people with a sailplane background tend to do better in that aspect during the training phase. However the slowness, unpredictabillity and limited options you have as to where you go and when are really a showstopper for me. Plus I hear from a lot of people that you spend a lot of time on the field but very little time flying.

jvmasset
03-25-2007, 05:12 AM
Hello!

Where are you considering flying?

In my own (French) club, which is said as quite expensive (South of France, 30 club-owned glass gliders, 340 flyable days a year), pricing for a less than 25 years of age is as follows:

- Annual club fee + federal license fee: ~180€
- Flat fee for 20 h flying school: 255€
- 1/100th mn tow time: 3.2 € (i.e: 300 to 350 € for said 20 hours)
- You are allowed to take a second flying school fee
- Another flat fee for newly qualified glider pilots (only if trained in the club!): 750€ unlimited hours on trainers (i.e. Astir, Pgase, LS3, LS4, DG300). This flat fee is renewable once the following year?
- If the this flat fee is not convenient because you are not living close enough: 16.5€/H for trainers, 20€ for two-seater (K21, Twin), 33€ for performance two-seater (DuoDiscus), limited to 5 H max. charged per flight.

The price for the qualification deliverance is 70€ once.

Unfortunately, there is no winch, so the towplane is what is costing the most money...The prices above include everything.

One advice: do not ask yourself anymore, do it!
If you are indeed passionate about it, you will never look back, and you will find ways first to be able to pay, and then to pay less...Because indeed there are ways for this, including in my club!

Regards,

JVM

p-11.cAce
03-25-2007, 07:15 AM
I have a PPL with both single engine and glider endorsements - but in the last 4 years I've only flown gliders. Why? Because unless you've got a lot of money, or are being paid to fly, droning around in a Cessna for $60+ an hour gets real old real fast! On the other hand, flying gliders at my club is a lot of fun, relativly inexpensive (a tow runs $35 and most days I can fly until I want to come down), and gliders are a blast to fly! There is a reason almost every airforce in the world (including ours) runs cadets through a glider course - there is simply no better way to ingrain basic aircraft handling and energy managment skills. Find a local club, be a stand up guy, and I think you'll find yourself airborne sooner and for less money than you might imagine.

We recently soloed a bright, excited 17 year old who came from a fairly poor family near the club. He earned his license cutting grass at the club field, running into town and picking up lunch for the guys, ground crewing, refuelling the tow planes, etc. I think his only out of pocket expense was gas for his car to get back and forth to the field and his exam fees. In the process of doing this he has become an integral part of the club, and some of the tow plane guys are considering a fund raiser to pay for his ppl. You never know what can happen http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

tjaika1910
03-25-2007, 09:52 AM
I read an interview once with a guy that was a WWII fighter, and then had 40 years of experience piloting sivilian aircraft.

As retired he began with gliders. He stated that then he for the first time FLEW. Gliders was the real thing.

general_kalle
03-25-2007, 09:58 AM
ive tried a Glider once as Passenger in a two seater. i got to try the controls though.
id never thought they aktually flew that fast.
the people i was flying with (per turn) did loops and things.. awesome.
i dont have the stumach for the G's.
ill stick to Virtual flying http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

M2morris
03-25-2007, 09:58 AM
I say: Go gliding for sure.(stick and rudder) In the mid 90s I was going down a highway in Massachusetts and I saw a glider pass over and land at a nearby field, I took the next exit and went on a demo flight, after that I was hooked. Some people can say its boring, but I love it. I've thermaled up to 9000 feet, thats as high as I've gone so far. My first solo in a glider happened unexpectedly when my instructor totally faked me out. He said we were going to release at 2000 ft and do some more stall practice. As we cleared the fence at the end of the field I called out "Two hundred feet" and he pulled the release on me;a simulated rope-brake. The tow plane went away and I did a teer-drop 180, and landed back on the grass air strip with no problem. As he helped me get the plane back to the take off point he said I did a good job as I had turned into the wind on the turn- around etc, and he said that on our next flight we really will go up to 2000 and do some stalls and turning practice. We finally got hooked up to the tow plane and were just about to take off, when he got out and said: "It's all yours, take her up." My jaw dropped, I couldnt beleive it, but the next thing I knew I was on aero tow by myself, and shortly after that I was circling 2000 feet over I-70 west of Baltimore, did'nt find many thermals but later I made a real nice landing. It was a beautiful sunny day I won't forget.

BillyTheKid_22
03-25-2007, 09:59 AM
http://www.pointvista.com/WW2GliderPilots/LubbockTraining/Wickenburg%20Arizona%20Glider%20Basic%20Training.j pg



http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Glider Basic Training at Wickeburg, Arizona.



http://www.pointvista.com/WW2GliderPilots/TG6caption.jpg



http://www.militaryrelocationcoloradosprings.com/mil/wallpaper/glider_1024x768.jpg



Colorado Spring, Colorado!!

LStarosta
03-25-2007, 10:08 AM
Originally posted by p-11.cAce:
I have a PPL with both single engine and glider endorsements - but in the last 4 years I've only flown gliders. Why? Because unless you've got a lot of money, or are being paid to fly, droning around in a Cessna for $60+ an hour gets real old real fast! On the other hand, flying gliders at my club is a lot of fun, relativly inexpensive (a tow runs $35 and most days I can fly until I want to come down), and gliders are a blast to fly! There is a reason almost every airforce in the world (including ours) runs cadets through a glider course - there is simply no better way to ingrain basic aircraft handling and energy managment skills. Find a local club, be a stand up guy, and I think you'll find yourself airborne sooner and for less money than you might imagine.

We recently soloed a bright, excited 17 year old who came from a fairly poor family near the club. He earned his license cutting grass at the club field, running into town and picking up lunch for the guys, ground crewing, refuelling the tow planes, etc. I think his only out of pocket expense was gas for his car to get back and forth to the field and his exam fees. In the process of doing this he has become an integral part of the club, and some of the tow plane guys are considering a fund raiser to pay for his ppl. You never know what can happen http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

2 points:

$60 is relatively dirt cheap for a Cessna (I assume 152).

The glider program has been restricted to USAFA cadets only, which is a bummer because it used to be open to cadets from other commissioning sources. As far as I know USAFA did the same thing with parachute certification recently.


However, gliders are the **** and I really want to get certified, unfortunately the nearest field with gliders is ~35 miles away. From my experience, gliders seem to be more popular in Europe than in the US. Either way, after soaring a few times, in a two-seater, it feels like surfing except in the air where the sound of the rushing water is replaced by rushing air. Truly the most natural form of airmanship a human being can experience.

M2morris
03-25-2007, 10:08 AM
Some guys go out and spend a ton of money on a motorcycle or a car. I'll get a glider instead.
This is the glider I have my eyes on, its affordable and do-able. Its the baby I want for sure. Blanik L-33 Solo. MmmmHmm

http://www.nwi.net/~blanikam/ba/prod02.htm (http://www.nwi.net/%7Eblanikam/ba/prod02.htm)

BillyTheKid_22
03-25-2007, 10:17 AM
Originally posted by M2morris:
Some guys go out and spend a ton of money on a motorcycle or a car. I'll get a glider instead.
This is the glider I have my eyes on, its affordable and do-able. Its the baby I want for sure. Blanik L-33 Solo. MmmmHmm

http://www.nwi.net/~blanikam/ba/prod02.htm (http://www.nwi.net/%7Eblanikam/ba/prod02.htm)



http://users.goldengate.net/~tmrent/soar/pics/polar4.gif



Look Blanik L-33 Solo !! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif



http://users.goldengate.net/~tmrent/soar/pics/33_1.jpg



http://www.srh.noaa.gov/ssd/tstm/images/sailplane.gif

BillyTheKid_22
03-25-2007, 10:44 AM
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/boundforglory/images/bg0067.jpg



WW II Glider,

Marine glider at Page Field, Parris Island, South Carolina, May 1942

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif



http://www.old-picture.com/united-states-1930s-1940s/pictures/Training-Pilots-Glider.jpg

muchaclopiec
03-25-2007, 10:46 AM
What country are you from? In the UK there is an organisation called the Air Training Corps which is affiliated to the Royal Air Force. The ATC teaches young guys and gals the basics of flying and i beleive can train its cadets to solo. Check around in your country and see if there is a similar organisation.
Your local club may have a scheme to attract younger members by offering a discount on the flying costs its worth asking..
Flying a sailplane is positively cool ( some cool dudes..Neil Armstrong, Alan Shepherd, Che Guevera, and the coolest dude ever- Steve Macqueen where all glider pilots. The actor who played Uncle Festa from the Adams Family tv show was a combat glider pilot in WW11!).
Yeah you can spend time waiting around for your flight, but then thats where you become involved in helping to keep the club running.
For me flying a sailplane seems like going back in time to the days of the early aviators- its real seat of the pants flying, far more than in modern powered aircraft..and remember each time you go up theres a fresh challenge to take on gravity and try and stay airborne for as long as you can.

Go for it youll have fun.

Redwulf 32 - Nis
03-25-2007, 11:50 AM
Welcome to the madness - do it!

Surprised nobody has come up with this link yet.

UKsmokinhispeed (http://www.hoult.org/bruce/gliding/UKsmokinhispeed.wmv)

Started as an aviation crazed kid when I was 15. I'm 55 now and still just as enthusiastic. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

tigertalon
03-25-2007, 12:59 PM
Is this Lesce airfield? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Warrington_Wolf
03-25-2007, 01:39 PM
I've been on two trial lessons now. The first one was a present from my Mum and Dad for my 21st birthday, and that was at Liverpool John Lennon airport. I payed for my second one and that was at Barton Aerodrome.
I am now hoping to start flight training at Barton later on this year, after two years of money saving and doing lots of overtime. Flying for real is a fantastic experience, expecially if you fly over an area that you recognize (like your home town/city). I even flew over the street where I live, my old high school, my old gym and my place of work. The first lesson also took me over the centre of Liverpool so I could see the Albert Dock, the two cathedrals and the Liver building. Unfortulately I didn't see Anfield though.
I've heard (but cannot prove) that people who learn to fly gliders become more proficient pilots, because they need to get the most performance out of their craft. I believe that Adolf Galland said something about glider pilots being able to "feel" the air better.

To sum what I said, do it. It is one of the most wonderful experiences that you can do (in my opinion anyway) http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif. You may have to work lots of overtime to do it, and save like hell but keep your mind on your set of wings and you will be ok.

P.S. The ladies love pilots http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif.

p-11.cAce
03-25-2007, 02:19 PM
This is the glider I have my eyes on, its affordable and do-able. Its the baby I want for sure. Blanik L-33 Solo. MmmmHmm

That's a sweet glider for sure - I have no time in one but our club field has two based there. I trained in the L-23 and have 80 or so hours in it - really nice flying glider and built like a tank. I went through the decision making process and ended up as a 1/4 owner of PW-5. Not as good a glide but it sure is easy to rig and de-rig.

M2morris
03-25-2007, 03:02 PM
Originally posted by p-11.cAce:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">This is the glider I have my eyes on, its affordable and do-able. Its the baby I want for sure. Blanik L-33 Solo. MmmmHmm

That's a sweet glider for sure - I have no time in one but our club field has two based there. I trained in the L-23 and have 80 or so hours in it - really nice flying glider and built like a tank. I went through the decision making process and ended up as a 1/4 owner of PW-5. Not as good a glide but it sure is easy to rig and de-rig. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

That L-23 is the first glider I ever flew in and it made a long lasting impression on me, it would be a good plane for giving rides, kinda like the L-13, but one time I saw a guy come in at about 80-90kts(est)over the Sterling Airfield in Massachusetts in an L-33, he did a loop. I thought he was trying to ripp the wings off that thing.
Yeah it is a sweet little plane. A Schweizer 126 ia a cheap option for soaring, but they dont have the prettiness of an L-33, that L-33 gets me all twitterpated. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

domenlovrec
03-26-2007, 06:49 AM
Originally posted by tigertalon:
Is this Lesce airfield? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Yes, it is.

I'm from Slovenia.I'm looking over the internet for more info but after read all these posts i'm sure i'll be up in the sky as soon as posible. Tnx for all replys, realy nice! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Are gliders safe? Those emergency landings look dangerous. :S

muchaclopiec
03-26-2007, 04:52 PM
Originally posted by domenlovrec:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by tigertalon:
Is this Lesce airfield? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Yes, it is.

I'm from Slovenia.I'm looking over the internet for more info but after read all these posts i'm sure i'll be up in the sky as soon as posible. Tnx for all replys, realy nice! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Are gliders safe? Those emergency landings look dangerous. :S </div></BLOCKQUOTE>have you tried Condor a very good gliding simulator from Slovenia?

http://www.condorsoaring.com/about.htm

BillyTheKid_22
03-26-2007, 05:01 PM
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/B000IDNU38.02._AA280_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg



http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Good!!



http://www.simhq.com/_air5/images/air_167a_001t.jpg







http://www.simhq.com/_air5/images/air_167a_007t.jpg



www.silentwingsairshows.com (http://www.silentwingsairshows.com)



http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif



www.silentwings.no/home/ (http://www.silentwings.no/home/)



http://silentwings.no/ezimagecatalogue/catalogue/variations/242-700x9999.jpg



www.gliderforum.com (http://www.gliderforum.com)



I know , My friend 's owner 2 New Glider 2 person at Colorado Spring, Colorado!!! He is COOL!! He's real pilot is Good man! I will ask him. What kind about Glider!!

p-11.cAce
03-26-2007, 06:29 PM
Condor is amazing - imho its weather model blows everything else (even silent wings) out of the water. It was good at release but the patch last year that added micro lift and feeder thermals with multiple cores elevated it to the top...be sure http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Condor is also a great way to practice tows - the sight picture is exactly the same in RL and the FM is spot on. If you can hang in on a 4000' tow with the weather maxed in Condor nothing in RL will catch you out (except for a rope break...which is modeled as well http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif)

LStarosta
03-26-2007, 08:16 PM
I just got Condor and it is amazing.

It's fun to play with a mouse during class, too. I love it!

Padser
03-27-2007, 07:28 AM
~S~

For a cheap(-er, nothing related to real aviation is 'cheap' in the conventional sense... ), you could also consider microlight flying (ultralight if you live in the States).

Microlight flying is far less regulated than conventional light aircraft, is cheaper and you can get licensed quicker.

Options run from weight-shift (essentially sophisticated hang-gliders with engines and seats) to three-axis aircraft. Of the latter variety, modern versions are increasingly coming to resemble their GA light aircraft counterparts and often out-perform their GA training counterparts in terms of climb, speed, etc., although tend to be more restricted by weather conditions and are for VFR (always in visual contact with the surface of the earth), daytime and non-aerobatic flight only.

I'm learning to fly the EV-97 Eurostar and it's a beaut'! (http://www.flycb.com/ev97eurostar.html)

Go on, let slip 'the surly bonds of earth...'

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Pads

NAFP_supah
03-27-2007, 10:51 AM
Originally posted by Padser:
~S~

For a cheap(-er, nothing related to real aviation is 'cheap' in the conventional sense... ), you could also consider microlight flying (ultralight if you live in the States).

Microlight flying is far less regulated than conventional light aircraft, is cheaper and you can get licensed quicker.

Options run from weight-shift (essentially sophisticated hang-gliders with engines and seats) to three-axis aircraft. Of the latter variety, modern versions are increasingly coming to resemble their GA light aircraft counterparts and often out-perform their GA training counterparts in terms of climb, speed, etc., although tend to be more restricted by weather conditions and are for VFR (always in visual contact with the surface of the earth), daytime and non-aerobatic flight only.

I'm learning to fly the EV-97 Eurostar and it's a beaut'! (http://www.flycb.com/ev97eurostar.html)

Go on, let slip 'the surly bonds of earth...'

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Pads

Also a quick way to die really really horribly those powered hanggliders. Agreed on the VLA and MLA's quickly making GA aircraft redundant though. Most of those things are allready faster then my Cessna 172 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

p-11.cAce
03-27-2007, 11:22 AM
The top quality trikes are not bad safety wise - the foot launch add on engines can be a bit crazy due to spiral instability. The limit lines on the Doodlebug powered unit are supposed to help with that.

The Outback trikes are really amazing - though they cost as much as a really nice used Cessna! This one has the same 100hp engine that is in the Diamond Katana - the airplane I earned my ppl in http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

http://www.airborne.com.au/images/galleries/912/images/912scott.jpg

LStarosta
03-27-2007, 07:45 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQg-PdylIvk

slappedsilly
03-28-2007, 10:10 AM
Always remember when learning how to fly, leasons and even more leasons are much, much cheaper than funerals. I fly and hear too many stories of people not getting sufficient instruction. It's money well spent.

p-11.cAce
03-28-2007, 11:16 AM
Soaring the Alps in DG500 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0Y-9VCpfS8)

If this does not make you want to run out and start soaring nothing will - check out the looping sequence at 3:20. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

huggy87
03-28-2007, 01:11 PM
What kind of idiot would get in a plane without an engine?

p-11.cAce
03-28-2007, 01:35 PM
Gliders, sailplanes, they are wonderful flying machines. It's the closest you can come to being a bird.

" Neil Armstrong

The soaring pilot makes an aerial excursion, not an incursion. His passage leaves a whisper, not a shriek.

" Richard Miller, 1967.

The air to a glider pilot is a reality. . . . He is trying to understand it in all its moods; to learn its flow, its laws, and to try and use this knowledge to his own ends.

" Philip Wills

RocketDog
03-28-2007, 02:08 PM
Gliding is fantastic - it combines all the fun of any type of aviation with the use of the elements you get in sailing. A lot of the flying is very dramatic, aerotows, tight thermalling turns, basic aerobatics etc, and it's very cheap compared to power flying.

Also, remember that when you are flying at a steep bank and climbing strongly in a thermal with several other gliders you will actually be one of the coolest people alive (this has been proven by scientists).

I have just bought one of these for about the cost of a 600 cc motorcycle. Hoorah!

Cheers,

RD.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v402/RocketDog/hexe.jpg

ploughman
03-28-2007, 02:21 PM
Groovy baby, where you flying from?

RocketDog
03-28-2007, 02:22 PM
Originally posted by domenlovrec:
Are gliders safe? Those emergency landings look dangerous. :S

Gliding has about the same risk of a serious accident as motorcycling. There is a good article on safety here: www.gliding.me.uk (http://www.gliding.me.uk) - although the accident rate is now significantly better than during the interval considered in the article. As with a motrcycle, you need to be careful and aware of the risks. It's not perfectly safe, but the chance of a serious accident is very small and as with many things in life, if you tried to reduce risk altogether, you would never leave your house.

Cheers,

RD.

ploughman
03-28-2007, 02:25 PM
Well, statistics demonstrate that most accidents happen at home, you're way safer in a hang glider than having a shower.

RocketDog
03-28-2007, 02:35 PM
Originally posted by Ploughman:
Groovy baby, where you flying from?

It's the Bath, Wilts and North Dorset Gliding Club near Warminster. It's about a 40 minute drive from your house http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif. http://www.bwnd.co.uk/

If you fancy a go, you can take a trial leson in a Puchacz two-seater for about 70 - 100. Once you start to learn it's quite a bit cheaper. From memory, if you join for a year it's about 7 for a winch launch and 18 per hour in the two seater once you're up. Once you are solo you can rent the single-seaters for about 12 to 15 per hour. Let me know if you are interested.

Cheers,

RD.

RocketDog
03-28-2007, 02:36 PM
Originally posted by Ploughman:
Well, statistics demonstrate that most accidents happen at home, you're way safer in a hang glider than having a shower.

Yep - I believe more people are killed every year in the UK by their trousers than in flying accidents.

RD.

ploughman
03-28-2007, 02:42 PM
Cheers Dog, I think I know the field.

Me and Mrs Ploughman are moving in a month or so, up to Snowdonia so I'll be an ex-Bradfordian soon, but I do envy you your wings, alot. That rental for a single seater is !http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif!, boats on lakes cost more than that.