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Uncle_Stranger
02-13-2009, 02:31 AM
How do I jump out of my plane?

Just kidding. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif


But I've been wondering, how safe was it to bail out, during WW2?
What was the risk of hitting your own plane during the bail out?

AllorNothing117
02-13-2009, 04:47 AM
Pretty safe, happened all the time. If role the plane upside down and then fall out, you should be o.k. If u cannot and have to bail out with the plane right way up you should slide off the wing becasue the airflow there naturaly puches you under the tail. Hit the tail and your screwed.

I read a book called "fighter boys" about huricane and spitfire Pilots, and allot of their canopies got stuck, possibly due to the cold at high Altittude. Now that would ruin your day...

gorkyporky
02-13-2009, 04:50 AM
i would imagine it was probably a bit safer than IL shows it to be. I mean, my pilot hits some part of the plane every time i hit the silk!

Uncle_Stranger
02-13-2009, 05:33 AM
Originally posted by gorkyporky:
i would imagine it was probably a bit safer than IL shows it to be. I mean, my pilot hits some part of the plane every time i hit the silk!

But in Il-2 pilot doesn't die from hitting the plane. So I guess bailing out in Il-2 is safer than in was real life.

M_Gunz
02-13-2009, 08:04 AM
Safer to bail under 200mph and over 500m.

Waldo.Pepper
02-13-2009, 10:34 AM
I believe it to be a choice of pilot preference. Some preferred to trust their lives to their trusted planes rather than their untested chutes. I know of a number of the Luftwaffe who felt that way, preferring to belly land rather than bail. But it is like having the runs I suppose. If you've gotta go, then you've gotta go.

Choctaw111
02-13-2009, 12:11 PM
Well, in Il2 there is no risk as you sometimes pass right through your plane.

DKoor
02-13-2009, 01:56 PM
Originally posted by Uncle_Stranger:
How do I jump out of my plane?

Just kidding. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif


But I've been wondering, how safe was it to bail out, during WW2?
What was the risk of hitting your own plane during the bail out? Unlikely to some of our forum mates who thinks it was almost a piece of cake I seem not to agree...
Too many pilots lost their lives while and after bailout...

SeaFireLIV
02-13-2009, 02:50 PM
Originally posted by Uncle_Stranger:
How do I jump out of my plane?

Just kidding. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif


But I've been wondering, how safe was it to bail out, during WW2?
What was the risk of hitting your own plane during the bail out?

Bailing out of an aircraft in WW2 was FAR more dangerous than in IL2.

In IL2 you can bail from any angle and you`ll be fine.

In reality, in ideal conditions, you wanted your aircraft straight and steady, possibly inverted, but in COMBAT:

1. If you were hurt escaping out of your aircraft would be difficult, perhaps impossible.

2. If the aircraft cockpit was damaged you might have to waste seconds wedging open the pit or even never bail in time.

3. Avoid parts of your plane so you or your parachute doesn`t catch, you could lose or damage chute - long fall. You could kill yourself from plane impact.

4. Hope you`re not in a death dive or you have very little hope (replicated in IL2).

5. Hope you`re high enough above ground (replicated in IL2).

6. Hope you`re fast enough. You have only seconds.

Imagine all this under fire, with an aircraft out of control, while crapping yourself in fear with the thought of potential death upper most in your mind.

I`ve read and seen footage of pilots who literally just throw themselves out of their doomed plane, legs and arms akimbo, swooping right past the guncam of the attacking aircraft.

It was a heck of a lot harder in reality. The risk had to be quite high.

M_Gunz
02-13-2009, 04:12 PM
Originally posted by Waldo.Pepper:
I believe it to be a choice of pilot preference. Some preferred to trust their lives to their trusted planes rather than their untested chutes. I know of a number of the Luftwaffe who felt that way, preferring to belly land rather than bail. But it is like having the runs I suppose. If you've gotta go, then you've gotta go.

I wondered why some flying suits are brown.

M_Gunz
02-13-2009, 04:24 PM
Originally posted by SeaFireLIV:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Uncle_Stranger:
How do I jump out of my plane?

Just kidding. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif


But I've been wondering, how safe was it to bail out, during WW2?
What was the risk of hitting your own plane during the bail out?

Bailing out of an aircraft in WW2 was FAR more dangerous than in IL2.

In IL2 you can bail from any angle and you`ll be fine.

In reality, in ideal conditions, you wanted your aircraft straight and steady, possibly inverted, but in COMBAT:

1. If you were hurt escaping out of your aircraft would be difficult, perhaps impossible.

2. If the aircraft cockpit was damaged you might have to waste seconds wedging open the pit or even never bail in time.

3. Avoid parts of your plane so you or your parachute doesn`t catch, you could lose or damage chute - long fall. You could kill yourself from plane impact.

4. Hope you`re not in a death dive or you have very little hope (replicated in IL2).

5. Hope you`re high enough above ground (replicated in IL2).

6. Hope you`re fast enough. You have only seconds.

Imagine all this under fire, with an aircraft out of control, while crapping yourself in fear with the thought of potential death upper most in your mind.

I`ve read and seen footage of pilots who literally just throw themselves out of their doomed plane, legs and arms akimbo, swooping right past the guncam of the attacking aircraft.

It was a heck of a lot harder in reality. The risk had to be quite high. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I've read about it being done and heard told it given in training to actually climb out on the wing holding the leading edge
far enough to clear the tail and then let go and slide off. The great fear was the tail. Even inverted if you're going too
fast the tail can hit you.

A human in a suit and chute has a terminal velocity around 100-120mph so get the speed down around there and you shouldn't
get a great deal of speed difference between you and the tail and have time to fall clear.

There were quite a few pilots who did survive multiple bailouts though, so perhaps it's not a coin flip?

SeaFireLIV
02-13-2009, 06:57 PM
Originally posted by M_Gunz:


There were quite a few pilots who did survive multiple bailouts though, so perhaps it's not a coin flip?

Well, yea. It obviously depends on aircraft and situation. I`ve seen clips of pilots and crew all bailing from a stricken B17 while it`s rolling over. Now that must be hard to do, especially for the trailers, but they managed it... Still they may have sustained some injuries - and they have the advantage of very high altitude.

unreasonable
02-13-2009, 08:18 PM
Aircraft design must have made quite a difference. I cannot remember where I read it, but I believe the survival rate of aircrew (or perhaps just of pilots & flight engineers) in downed Halfax bombers was about double the rate for the Lancaster (a better aircraft in every other respect). The Halifax had a hatch near the nose that the pilot and flight engineer could use whereas in the Lanc they had to climb back over the main spar to get to a mid-section hatch, IIRC.

larschance
02-14-2009, 03:34 AM
Bail out success varied with aircraft types. The rear gunner in a Defiant had almost no chance. Some bomber crew had no room for a chute in their station so had to traverse the aircraft often when it is manouevring or out of control in order to get their chute. This took vital seconds and loss of height. It must have been terrifying.
The most famous pilot I read about was Hans Joachim Marseille who was the most successful desert war German ace and he died while baling out of a new 109G. It seems he broke his back and arm on the tailfin. It was a risk all pilots took so I can see why some prefered to belly in.

Aaron_GT
02-14-2009, 03:55 AM
Imagine all this under fire, with an aircraft out of control, while crapping yourself in fear with the thought of potential death upper most in your mind.

Plus you might be wounded or be burning to death at the time http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif Grim stuff.

DKoor
02-14-2009, 07:25 AM
Some of the guys that bailed over a vast sea should be a lot better if they just stayed in their cockpits. Most of them have never been found.

larschance
02-14-2009, 10:26 AM
Burning to death or drowning at sea, let alone shark attacks, crippled for life etc. It is a wonder any aircrew took off.
Psychologically the optimism of youth and the 'wont happen to me' attitude kept them going. But as the missions mounted in number they knew the odds of survival were reducing as they flew on. Good job we are safe in our sim cockpits.

Aaron_GT
02-14-2009, 11:23 AM
But as the missions mounted in number they knew the odds of survival were reducing as they flew on

Odds per mission would probably improve with time with increasing experience (everything else being equal). Culmulative risk is another matter - every mission increases total exposure to risk, even if by a diminishing amount each time.

Where this didn't seem to hold true was the Bomber Command night missions as the crews didn't see the NF attacks by Shrage Musik and flak is fairly random. Loss rate per mission of aircraft was about 4%, some got to bail, some died even if the plane made it back, some crashed even before leaving the UK, so it must have been something like a 1 in 50 risk of death each time you took off.