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View Full Version : How do YOU use your rudder pedals?



nvrsummer2
05-27-2010, 11:38 AM
I wasnt going to get pedals, then I saw a pair on craigslist for $70 and said what the hell!

They are the Saitek pro flight ones. And after an initial flight im wondering how they are properly used.

I'd like to ask how you guys use them in flight. And overall proper pedal use. Ive read posts about how they are supposed to be used but wanted to ask how YOU use them...

Lets say, i am turning left.. how and when does the rudder come into play? Am I just trying to keep the little ball centered? If so that only requires slight use of the pedals. How does use of the rudder impact flight?

Bearcat99
05-27-2010, 12:17 PM
I use my pedals instinctively now.. My suggestion is to get in a QM and fly around.. try to keep the ball as centered as possible. It all depends. The pedals are for your rudder. You would use them the same way you would a twist rudder. It is hard to explain... Just try to keep the ball centered.. make sure you are trimmed. You can sometimes use the rudder to kick the sight onto the target just a smidgeon.. or to slow down by slipping... it varies. Where are you with the $60 Saiteks? What state?

p-11.cAce
05-27-2010, 12:47 PM
Rudder use depends on many different factors - aircraft, trims available, speed, etc. As Bearcat said the simplest explanation of rudder usage is to "step on the ball" i.e. apply pressure to the pedal on the same side the ball is off center. I spend most of my time in an Emil which has no rudder trim (other than a ground adjustable trim tab) so the rudder gets a big stomp as the tail lifts on takeoff to counteract prop torque, lesser pressure as you approach rudder trim speed, none at rudder trim speed. In turns I lead with a little turn side rudder to counteract adverse-yaw from the ailerons and then just keep the ball centered as needed.

Mr_Zooly
05-27-2010, 12:53 PM
Having used twist rudder for many years I kind of got used to it, then the day came that I bought some rudder pedals for immersion purposes. Long story short, never got the hang of them despite hours of trying so now they are sat under my desk awaiting the next try which my take a while.

Friendly_flyer
05-27-2010, 02:05 PM
I have a pair of Saitek pedals, and love them to death!

I got them when I joined a squadron and we started doing carrier take-offs. Until then, I had used two keys on my keyboard, but that became too much to keep track of when taking off with a heavily loaded Seafire.

I also use it to help aiming when in combat. The pedals are really great, and becomes second nature rather fast (unless you are used to twisties, beastly thing they are).

ytareh
05-27-2010, 03:54 PM
MR ZOOLY thankfully SOMEONE feels the same as me.I absolutely HATED the CH rudder pedals I used for a couple of weeks !I could imagine them putting your skills back a year or more not to mention having to do major reconstruction surgery on your PC workstation.I even suffered from leg ache and was a very fit athlete at the time ...These things arent cheap so decide carefully guys .At least they are easy to resell at a good price ...

K_Freddie
05-27-2010, 03:57 PM
Old stuff but relevant
V408 Scissors (53MB) (http://www.vanjast.com/IL2Movies/Scissors.avi)
V408 track (100KB) (http://www.vanjast.com/IL2Movies/FW_Flight1.zip)

As for Co-ordinated flight = stepping-on-the-ball, do not try this in combat situations as you'll spin-out very quickly, but rather rely on the 'feel' of the a/c while 'stepping' on the rudder.
What this essentially means is that the 'ball' will be off-centre with some a/c to maintain 'perfect co-ordinated' flight conditions. Practicing on your fav a/c will show you the way.
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Urufu_Shinjiro
05-27-2010, 04:06 PM
For those that have trouble switching from twisty stick to rudder pedals, try it again. It took me maybe 6-8 WEEKS to get back to where I was with the twist stick, but then I quickly advanced MUCH faster and much farther than I did or could have with the twisty stick. Trust me, no matter how long it takes to get used to the pedals it's worth it in the end. The simple fact that stick movements no longer result in the occasional rudder input and vice-verse is worth the time it takes to adjust.

Ba5tard5word
05-27-2010, 06:45 PM
I'd like to ask how you guys use them in flight. And overall proper pedal use. Ive read posts about how they are supposed to be used but wanted to ask how YOU use them...

Whether you are using twist or pedals, expect to need a LOT of practice before you get good with them. It will be frustrating at first but eventually you'll get very used to them and feel like you've lost a limb when your rudder cables get shot out by an enemy and you can't use them!

In general I would say try and experiment with them a bit at first, like flying 1000m up with no enemies. See what happens when you push them around left to right. Having good rudder settings is important, try and get some numbers from a Saitek user. It can take a long time to figure out good numbers that feel comfortable, I have mine from 45 to 100 with different increments in between.

The first thing you should do is use them for takeoffs and landings, this is probably the most important thing to use them for. They help you stay straight when taking off and help you do minor adjustments when landing. Again, takes practice.

After that you can use them when turning or when you are climbing and about to stall and need to avoid stalling, this sort of stuff is second nature to me now and I can't even really explain it.

Probably the toughest thing is to use them when firing. The main part here is to keep doing minute movements with your stick and rudder to keep your crosshairs where you want it so you can get hits on target. Again, takes practice. But even harder than that is to use your rudder to "walk" your crosshairs across the enemy, this is a good way to get in many hits across a larger area than if you were just firing at one point on the enemy plane. This requires really fine rudder movement and until you are used to them and have good settings you will probably veer wildly around. I could never do this when I had a twist rudder, it was too imprecise. Now that I have CH pedals and have been using them for a while I am just starting to be able to do this. It's easy enough on a larger plane like a bomber but tougher against a small plane like a Buffalo.


Having used twist rudder for many years I kind of got used to it, then the day came that I bought some rudder pedals for immersion purposes. Long story short, never got the hang of them despite hours of trying so now they are sat under my desk awaiting the next try which my take a while.

Like Urufu says, just bite the bullet and practice them for several months. You'll feel like a fish out of water at first but eventually you'll get used to them and like them.

My main reason at first for wanting pedals instead of a twist was that I wanted more stick control. My old Logitech 3D Extreme Pro (which I don't use anymore and is free to anyone who wants it!) had a much less precise stick in general than my CH stick, and the twist rudder would often throw my aim off because I would twist when I meant to just pull. I got more used to the twist eventually and didn't accidentally twist as much, but I really prefer the CH stick's much better precision.

WTE_Galway
05-27-2010, 07:02 PM
I mainly use rudder for:

- starting a turn, a kick of rudder gives a much sharper crisper roll
- picking up a dropped wing at low speed as using stick in this situation can exasperate the stall on that wing
- side slipping to wash off excess speed
- centering the ball when shooting
- in the bad old days when i actually used to fly online .. ludicrously uncoordinated turns were good for stuffing up people's aim trying to get a deflection shot at you

BillSwagger
05-27-2010, 09:01 PM
I use rudder trim for keeping the ball centered, and i use the rudder to aim, control landings/takeoffs, and roll better.

Il2 also has the full rudder options which come in handy for quick reactions and stall recoveries.

AndyJWest
05-27-2010, 09:15 PM
To be honest, I don't really know how I use the rudder (twisty stick in my case), but I know I use it. 'Keeping the ball centred' is a nice theory, and probably relates in some way to what I'm doing, but given the number of times in combat where the ball isn't on screen (I'm in gunsight view, so you can't see it, or it is hidden behind the control column as in many of the Soviet fighters), it is obviously based on external clues, and on 'feel'. With enough experience, you don't 'use' controls, any more than you 'use' your feet to walk. You decide what you want to do, and do it, and how exactly you do this becomes automatic.

WTE_Galway
05-27-2010, 09:33 PM
Originally posted by AndyJWest:
To be honest, I don't really know how I use the rudder (twisty stick in my case), but I know I use it. 'Keeping the ball centred' is a nice theory, and probably relates in some way to what I'm doing, but given the number of times in combat where the ball isn't on screen (I'm in gunsight view, so you can't see it, or it is hidden behind the control column as in many of the Soviet fighters), it is obviously based on external clues, and on 'feel'. With enough experience, you don't 'use' controls, any more than you 'use' your feet to walk. You decide what you want to do, and do it, and how exactly you do this becomes automatic.

The few real aircraft I flew (Several Cessna, Pipers and some ultralights) all tended to get noisy with air rush and even vibrate in uncoordinated flight. You kind of knew when it was coordinated as everything "smoothed out". You do not get these cues "in game". this lack of subtle cues is one of the reasons why current flightsims still remain a poor substitute for real flight experience.

My instructor used to train rudder control by getting us to fly on a constant heading while "rocking" the plane and keeping ball centered. He was perfectly capable of maintaining a constant altitude and heading as well as keeping the ball dead center while the aircraft banked alternately 45 degrees left and then 45 degrees right every few seconds. I had a lot of trouble with this exercise.

M_Gunz
05-28-2010, 12:31 AM
IRL the same force that moves the ball affects anyone inside the plane. Consider that on a flat road in a
turn that a passenger in a car will feel a skidding force, it pushes you towards the outside of the turn.
If you can ride on two wheels you should be able to tell when 'the ball is centered'.

bracknell1989
05-28-2010, 04:32 AM
With my feet.

FoolTrottel
05-28-2010, 09:55 AM
- To lose speed rapidly when on final approach for landing, by side slipping.

- To get a P51 out of snap stall. It's become an instant action, a reflex, for me ... don't ask me what I do

- To sway a bit left/right when attacking ground targets.

X32Wright
05-28-2010, 10:12 AM
For me for flight pedals to be effective it requires an ALL 100 input in the game so you can do rudder deflection shots nicely http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

K_Freddie
05-29-2010, 03:25 PM
Another thing to practise in tight combat situations, is to use you rudder to roll the plane instead of aerolons.
It's a much safer bet, as using aerolons accelerates a spin condition, not to mention the roll is that much faster.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

kimosabi79
05-29-2010, 03:51 PM
I don't understand how YOU guys can fly with a twist stick.... Gots to have them pedals man. To answer the question, I use them by pushing or pivot them with my feet. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

runyan99
05-29-2010, 05:23 PM
You often can't recover from a spin without rudders. That alone makes them pretty important for sim flying, unless you don't care about auguring in.

sveper
05-30-2010, 01:58 AM
Am I the only one using the pedals the opposite way? After been using a twisty stick it felt more natural to "push the nose" to the left with my right foot and vice versa. I tried to do it the right way but never got used to it. IŽll probably never fly for real so practicly it wount matter.

Col.BBQ
05-30-2010, 03:09 AM
What do you mean turning with your rudder is not the right way? I have been turning with my rudder ever since the game, "Fly!", taught me to turn 360 degrees with my rudder alone.

WTE_Galway
05-30-2010, 03:23 AM
Originally posted by sveper:
Am I the only one using the pedals the opposite way? After been using a twisty stick it felt more natural to "push the nose" to the left with my right foot and vice versa. I tried to do it the right way but never got used to it. IŽll probably never fly for real so practicly it wount matter.

Almost every student pilot that ever used a "billy cart" or "soapbox car" as a kid has this problem.

Basically you are trying to drive one of these instead of an aircraft:

http://www.comparestoreprices.co.uk/images/unbranded/2/unbranded-24v-electric-powered-billy-kart.jpg

RedToo
05-30-2010, 04:40 AM
Took me a long while to get used to rudder pedals - I too set them up the wrong way initially because it 'felt right'. Learning to use them properly was a bit of a nightmare, but persevere - I don't even think about what my feet are doing now. When I do think about it things go wrong. I still have dreams of one day flying for real (at least once) so using pedals the wrong way round is not an option!

RedToo.

mortoma
05-31-2010, 05:25 PM
I don't try to keep the ball centered in combat, only during cruise when I can more leisurely look down at the slip indicator. Seems like most planes in the game have a slip indicator you must scroll down to even see at all. And good luck seeing it no matter what you do in most Russian birds, as they are usually hidden by the stick!!

If you have TIR I guess it might be easier to "look" down to see it. In combat I just use the rudder by feel or actually seeing the plane slip/skid to the side. You really can't feel anything of course. I have gotten pretty good and sometimes I look down in combat or heavy manuevers just to see if I have the ball centered and most of the time I do in fact have it close.

I don't feel this game really simulates the airspeed slow down you'd get in real life by skidding, although a lot of simmers in IL2 boards insist you do. Doesn't seem to affect the speed of the aircraft in my experience. In turning you get slow downs and energy loss but not from skidding. IL2 is just not all that realistic in that way.

R_Target
05-31-2010, 05:51 PM
Learn your pedals on one plane. Then fly a bunch of stuff.

AndyJWest
05-31-2010, 06:02 PM
Originally posted by mortoma:
I don't try to keep the ball centered in combat, only during cruise when I can more leisurely look down at the slip indicator. Seems like most planes in the game have a slip indicator you must scroll down to even see at all. And good luck seeing it no matter what you do in most Russian birds, as they are usually hidden by the stick!!

If you have TIR I guess it might be easier to "look" down to see it. In combat I just use the rudder by feel or actually seeing the plane slip/skid to the side. You really can't feel anything of course. I have gotten pretty good and sometimes I look down in combat or heavy manuevers just to see if I have the ball centered and most of the time I do in fact have it close.

I don't feel this game really simulates the airspeed slow down you'd get in real life by skidding, although a lot of simmers in IL2 boards insist you do. Doesn't seem to affect the speed of the aircraft in my experience. In turning you get slow downs and energy loss but not from skidding. IL2 is just not all that realistic in that way.

Hum. I've always found sideslipping to be a good way to lose height without gaining speed, e.g. if too high on approach. Maybe it's just an illusion though. I should be able to test this with my autopilot setup - I'll try this sometime during the week.

T_O_A_D
06-01-2010, 12:51 AM
With my feet of course.

Kidding aside.

Set up your pedals, and use them.
Set your twist stick for rudder trim.
That way if your still cranking the stick, at least it's of some use. And it works a treat when using a bomb site to have rudder trim on the stick.

Also use only your toes on the base of the pedals in normal flight, and fighting.

I only place my feet up on them while ground handling, takeoff, and landing to have access to toe brakes.

I've had more than one real pilot tell me to do it this way.

I've found it to be more accurate, and less apt to over do it with just my toes, compared to the full foot.

Oh, and by all means, set them up right. You never know, someday you might get the chance to control a real aircraft, and all your virtual play training will of been wrong. And if it's an emergency, you'll feel pretty dam stupid at that point. Be Sure!

rfxcasey
06-01-2010, 06:02 AM
When I first started flying in IL-2 I was using a Gravis Xterminator Digital gamepad with 2 rudder flippers in the L1 R1 positions.
http://www.tweak3d.net/reviews/gravis/xterm/images/2.jpg
A lot of people asked me how I was able to fly with this but let me tell you I was a killer with it.

I recently bought a Thrustmaster T.Flight Hotas X
http://i.walmartimages.com/i/p/00/66/32/96/41/0066329641369_500X500.jpg

The stick and the throttle separate and the rudder control is on the throttle.

http://www.gamegear.be/images/TFlightHotasX800x600_4.jpg

The rudder control is very sensitive and I probably need to adjust it a bit but I have just gotten used to it.

For 40 bucks it's real nice and no leg fatigue.

As far as rudder use goes. Taxiing, taking off, landing, lining up targets both air and ground, hammerheads, and snap rolls. Besides that the two main and most combat useful thing I use the rudder for have to be

1. When deflection shooting sometimes you just need to bump the crosshair up a smidge without drastically changing your lead.

2. In slow speed turning if you learn to use just the right amount of rudder you can prevent a stall when you feel it coming.

That being said rudder use when lining up ground targets is essential when you want to stay parallel with the ground and you have a limited amount of time to get your site on target.

To be sure the rudder can be tricky to master but it is definately something that will make you much more efficient and lethal.

TheFamilyMan
06-01-2010, 02:18 PM
I spent my first year or so twisting the stick. When I switched to rudder pedals a sqaud member gave my this valuable advice:

Kick the ball with the foot that is closest!
Once I got used to doing that everything else followed. Nowadays using rudder pedals is simply an automatic response (but it took me at least a year to get there). BTW I'd probably have severe carpel tunnel by now if I'd continue twisting that stick (and not be able to fly at all).

One of our squad members gave up on trying to use pedals...too impatient is all I can say. I too suffered; but as mentioned, I'm now 'way better' for sticking (err..pedalling) with it, S!

Worf101
06-02-2010, 08:31 AM
Well I've had only 2 sets of udder pedals in all these years. First I had CH's offerings which were sevicable BUT they were way too narrow for my package and led to mucho frustration. Finally I bought a set of Simpeds from Dieter in Europe before his death and have been running them with my modded Uber Cougar rig ever since.

It's natural to me now, wouldn't know how ot use a twist stick now to save my life. total immersion, you don't even think about it anymore.

Worf

megalopsuche
06-02-2010, 10:18 AM
Originally posted by WTE_Galway:
ludicrously uncoordinated turns were good for stuffing up people's aim trying to get a deflection shot at you

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif Absolutely! Pedals are a necessity for defensive BFM, especially in a flat or rolling scissors.

triad773
06-02-2010, 10:26 AM
With CME and Realistic Landings, etc on I use my pedals rigorously to overcome torque on most planes. Not so much the P-38 with contra-rotating props, but with all the single engine (and many two-engined) planes.

I use them for slowing down in certain situations- rocking the pedals, side-slipping to evade, coordinated turns, and the like. I used to use a twisty stick; it worked, but it felt too toy-like to me.

What someone else said: pick a plane, any plane you like- go to school on it- learn how it feels using the pedals- how much reaction for how little motion- get the hang of it.

I recently started flying the B-25 more. It's a twin of course, but the props rotate both clockwise- so you get more pull to the left generally. That can be trimmed out, but for me on the take-off roll the pedals offer more flexibility for smooth takeoff.

Just my two cents.

Good luck with what ever way you end going http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

rfxcasey
06-03-2010, 07:30 AM
Originally posted by megalopsuche:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WTE_Galway:
ludicrously uncoordinated turns were good for stuffing up people's aim trying to get a deflection shot at you

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif Absolutely! Pedals are a necessity for defensive BFM, especially in a flat or rolling scissors. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I wouldn't say the peddles are a necessity but I would say rudder control is and can be implemented through various input methods.

p-11.cAce
06-03-2010, 10:15 AM
Hum. I've always found sideslipping to be a good way to lose height without gaining speed, e.g. if too high on approach. Maybe it's just an illusion though. I should be able to test this with my autopilot setup - I'll try this sometime during the week.

I'm very interested in your findings. In RL I spend most of my flying time in sailplanes and use a fwd slip at some point on almost every approach. In IL2 I do the same - probably out of habit as it's the sight picture I'm used to I guess. My understanding and experience is that fwd slip is an altitude loss maneuver and not an airspeed loss maneuver. In other words I fwd slip to accelerate vertically while retaining the same airspeed.

TheGrunch
06-03-2010, 11:23 AM
In Il-2 it seems to have the opposite effect, i.e., you lose a LOT of speed and some altitude.

BluesmanSF
06-04-2010, 12:25 AM
Originally posted by mortoma:
I don't try to keep the ball centered in combat, only during cruise when I can more leisurely look down at the slip indicator. Seems like most planes in the game have a slip indicator you must scroll down to even see at all. And good luck seeing it no matter what you do in most Russian birds, as they are usually hidden by the stick!!

If you have TIR I guess it might be easier to "look" down to see it. In combat I just use the rudder by feel or actually seeing the plane slip/skid to the side. You really can't feel anything of course. I have gotten pretty good and sometimes I look down in combat or heavy manuevers just to see if I have the ball centered and most of the time I do in fact have it close.

I don't feel this game really simulates the airspeed slow down you'd get in real life by skidding, although a lot of simmers in IL2 boards insist you do. Doesn't seem to affect the speed of the aircraft in my experience. In turning you get slow downs and energy loss but not from skidding. IL2 is just not all that realistic in that way.

Hmm, I find IL2 to be quite accurate about skidding. I'd suggest you try this: Fly in a tight formation with AI or online, and kick full rudder but try to remain on the same heading and altitude with stick = you're left behind with a good rate!

And for the topic, the most obvious advantage of the rudder pedals is the ease they allow to avoid stalling in continous combat manouvres. The reflexes does need some time to build as others have said, but after that, you'll be dancing on them without even noticing it!

Happy landings!
6S_Blues

Choctaw111
06-04-2010, 05:01 AM
At one time I used a MSFFB which has a twisty stick.
Simply put, if you are proficient with a twisty stick, then you already know a thing or two about rudder imputs.
The only problem I had was getting used to using my feet instead of my wrist for the rudder.
After a day or two it was fine.

WTE_Galway
06-04-2010, 10:27 PM
Originally posted by TheGrunch:
In Il-2 it seems to have the opposite effect, i.e., you lose a LOT of speed and some altitude.

It kinda depends on your nose attitude in the sideslip to be honest.

AndyJWest
06-04-2010, 10:37 PM
Originally posted by WTE_Galway:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by TheGrunch:
In Il-2 it seems to have the opposite effect, i.e., you lose a LOT of speed and some altitude.

It kinda depends on your nose attitude in the sideslip to be honest. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Yes. I only ever need to sideslip under two circumstances (except momentarily while aiming etc) - either in a high speed dive, to keep the speed down, or on landing approach, if I'm coming in too high.

At high speed, you only need a minor pitch change to maintain a constant angle of descent in a dive, whereas at low speed on finals, you aren't trying to change your airspeed, but changing the angle of descent instead. Sideslipping on final approach needs to be done with care though, so if you are really messing up an approach by being too high, go round...

TheGrunch
06-05-2010, 03:49 AM
Pretty much all I use them for as well, to be honest. Mainly on landing approach. For some reason the idea of using a sideslip in a high-speed dive never occurred to me...I suppose it's the time you need to readjust for it before you take a shot that puts me off.

AndyJWest
06-05-2010, 06:48 AM
Yes, that can be a problem, Grunch. It does sometimes also enable you to keep a slightly better eye on the target as you dive, but then you lose this at the critical moment. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

I was going to do some testing with my AP, wasn't I? Forgot all about it, but I'll try to do this in the next few days. If I pick a typical fighter and measure the speed drop in level flight at full throttle, cruise, and gear & flaps down approach, I should get an idea of the trends, and show whether it really makes that much difference.

EDIT ---
I've now done a little testing - results here: http://forums.ubi.com/eve/foru...181038668#2181038668 (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums?a=tpc&s=400102&f=23110283&m=2181038668&r=2181038668#2181038668)

TheGrunch
06-05-2010, 06:53 AM
I suppose it doesn't matter if you're going so fast relative to your target that they're almost stationary in your gunsight. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

MikkOwl
06-05-2010, 10:34 PM
First used nothing. Then two buttons on a CH Throttle (this was a long time ago, when IL-2 was just released). It did not work well at all.

In 2009, IL-2 1946 again. Cheap twist stick. But did not use the twist for it sucked. Instead used G25 pedals, which worked pretty well.

Then a G940 this year. Rudder pedals. Like some others, I felt like I had my feet on a steering wheel and so to turn left, I should 'rotate' it left (i.e. press right foot forward and left back). I had to double check to make sure that it was really supposed to be the other way around. A couple of days and it was okay.

The G25 pedals were the easiest to use. The G940 rudder pedals are so-so, but there's a nasty bug in them that makes them extremely nervous and hard to make any kind of precision input with what so ever. Made software for IL-2 to remove the effects of this bug which improved things a lot but annoyed by it.

The Rudder pedals are definitely not too easy to use. Especially if consumer type (A bit toy like, light resistance). If it was real heavy pedals I am sure it would be easier. The experience feels totally different in a more immersive way however.

As for rudder use:

1. To counter-act yaw movement from propeller or when flying on asymmetric thrust in a twin engined. Usually on take-off and landing.

2. To make gun-evasive maneuvers in combat.

3. To slow the airplane down, way down, quickly.

4. To turn while maintaining as much speed possible (flying coordinated). This one took me long until I found out about how it works. Whenever ailerons are being employed, aircraft yaw in the opposite direction of the roll. When one pushes stick left to roll left, the aircraft yaws to the right at the same time. So, the more stick movement and speed, the more I press the rudder pedal in the direction I am rolling with the ailerons. It is usually a small amount of rudder. Maybe 1/3 at the most in a Bf 110.

5. To drag the sights onto the correct point to aim to shoot at someone (usually for snapshots). Can do a lot of sideways shoot like that, especially head on.


As for the ball centered: can look at it and learn how the aircraft responds and how much rudder/trim is appropriate etc, but only when flying by oneself. In combat there is no time for looking around the dashboard for something like that. Not even for aiming. Have to just rely on what was learned when flying alone while looking at the ball: muscle memory on how much is appropriate and when.

Exception is when either pursued by someone or in pursuit, since not flying coordinated will induce lots of drag to slow you down.