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View Full Version : Are The Newest Books Usually The Most Accurate References?



ytareh
04-20-2008, 09:16 AM
Youd think that there would be a certain authenticity to books closer in time to the original events but more and more I get the impression that the best books on WW2 aviation are only just being written now .I have often splashed out on so called vintage books to find their quoted facts and figures are often inaccurate.Sometimes ridiculously so eg a 'classic' book on the Bf109 claiming that all F and G versions had the same top speed.It goes without saying that the quality of colour aircraft profiles has improved no end ...And much info is just coming to light since the fall of the Iron Curtain eg as posted here last week the american AVG squadron which flew out of Russia vs the Luftwaffe....

ytareh
04-20-2008, 09:18 AM
And for a real laugh try some actual WW2 books sometime...propaganda on all sides ...eg tales of early war Fairey Battles and Bristol Blenheims giving 109s a right good seeing to ...!

Metatron_123
04-20-2008, 09:42 AM
Yep. Jane's Aircraft of world war II (All the world's aircraft, 1945?)is a good example. Although that one has some figures that are relatively accurate.

Aaron_GT
04-20-2008, 03:59 PM
I would say the best reference are those that draw on the widest possible set of primary sources. Sometimes information is not available until decades after the event. This is very true of the USSR in WW2, and to some extent the USSR records also contain archives of material from German sources. Some WW2 records only exist in secondary from (e.g. from Shorts, whose records were destroyed by fire during WW2) or are only found in the back of long forgotten filing cabinets many years later (this certainly seems to happen with composers and authors, and a new Dumas novel has just been found in similar circumstances).

jarink
04-20-2008, 06:04 PM
Originally posted by Aaron_GT:
I would say the best reference are those that draw on the widest possible set of primary sources. Sometimes information is not available until decades after the event. This is very true of the USSR in WW2, and to some extent the USSR records also contain archives of material from German sources. Some WW2 records only exist in secondary from (e.g. from Shorts, whose records were destroyed by fire during WW2) or are only found in the back of long forgotten filing cabinets many years later (this certainly seems to happen with composers and authors, and a new Dumas novel has just been found in similar circumstances).

It seems like there has also been a recent trend of authors finding "new" source material (especially photos) that has spent the past 50+ years in some vet's attic. Sadly, it's usually only found after the vet has died and his/her relatives are looking through their things.

Treetop64
04-20-2008, 07:01 PM
I've found that some of the newest books I've bought are simply re-writes of older books

"Order of Battle - German Panzers in WWII" by Chris Bishop is an example since there are direct quotes in that publication that came from the excellent old Time-Life books of 1990; namely the Time-Life book "Barbarossa". Both books referencing of the German army's stabling of 300,000 horses before Barbarossa immediately comes to mind, since they are both written exactly the same way...

skarden
04-21-2008, 02:20 AM
i used to think so but after reading some pretty dodgy books on WWII with fact like what ytareh talks about and to boot i just picked up a book on BOB by Len Deighten called "fighter" which was first published in 1977 which seems to be very accurate(and a top read too, very balanced,highly recomended!) Im not so sure any more.

I think treetop nailed it.

R_Target
04-22-2008, 08:02 PM
Old or new, it depends on the quality of the sources.

Odin_Part_2
04-22-2008, 08:45 PM
Can't you just imagine though the types of books that will be written AFTER they release all of The World War II Documents from the United Kingdom's National Archives in 2035?

That is of course if they don't reset the lock on it for another 90 years.

Speculation is, that in 2035, everyone who was around during World War II will be dead and buried, and there won't be any harm anymore in everyone in the world learning the TRUTH about World War II.

Skoshi Tiger
04-22-2008, 09:09 PM
Originally posted by Odin_Part_2:
Can't you just imagine though the types of books that will be written AFTER they release all of The World War II Documents from the United Kingdom's National Archives in 2035?

That is of course if they don't reset the lock on it for another 90 years.

Speculation is, that in 2035, everyone who was around during World War II will be dead and buried, and there won't be any harm anymore in everyone in the world learning the TRUTH about World War II.

Yes apparently Adolph was right and germany was very hard done by. Just look in Argentina.

They're having a Rock concert to celebrate AH's Birthday.

Every one who writes books does so to present history from their point of view. It's just easier if all the people who took part in the event are dead! No one to complaign