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steeldelete
02-10-2008, 04:22 AM
Well, since I have a few devices (Fighterstick, Throttle, Pedals) I started programming different things, like Prop Pitch, Mixture, Supercharger and Trim.

I love to fly the following planes (all models)
Bf109
P40
Hurricane
P51
Ki-61

Since I have programmed my devices I'd like to use them. I tried out the Hurricane with changing the mixture, when would I do that? That and where do I take influence with what on which model?

What gauges do I need to observe during flight? And what influences it, like supercharger changes manifold pressure, but when?

I'm now observing speed, fuel, height and the ball. What else is important?

Thanks!

steeldelete
02-10-2008, 04:22 AM
Well, since I have a few devices (Fighterstick, Throttle, Pedals) I started programming different things, like Prop Pitch, Mixture, Supercharger and Trim.

I love to fly the following planes (all models)
Bf109
P40
Hurricane
P51
Ki-61

Since I have programmed my devices I'd like to use them. I tried out the Hurricane with changing the mixture, when would I do that? That and where do I take influence with what on which model?

What gauges do I need to observe during flight? And what influences it, like supercharger changes manifold pressure, but when?

I'm now observing speed, fuel, height and the ball. What else is important?

Thanks!

DmdSeeker
02-10-2008, 05:05 AM
Mixture is only really needed in two scenarios:

Carrier takeoffs, where you can push it up to 120% on some planes for a little extra power at sea level (take it back to 100% as soon as you're up).

Some planes, mainly Russian ones, suffer from an over rich mixture at higher alts. You'll notice a loss in power and your engine will smoke. On these you'll need to progressivly cut back the mixture the higher you go.

thefruitbat
02-10-2008, 05:11 AM
Different planes have different things available, some fuel mixture is automatic, some prop pitch is automatic, some have just elevator trim, others the full shebang, and some have automatic superchargers, some manual.

Just a few examples

109, automatic superchager, auto mixture, only elevator trim, and prop pitch should be left on auto.

la 5, manual supercharger, manual fuel mixture (reduce with height), elevator and ruddder trim, and prop pitch can be uttalised for cruise and in dives.

It really depends on plane to plane, what you need to do.

see this thread for more help, nuggets guide

http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/23110283/m/9121094645

cheers fruitbat

OMK_Hand
02-10-2008, 01:51 PM
Hi steeldelete.

You show an interest... but you're asking rather a lot... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

If you're up for some research, this is a good read specifically in chapter II, 'The running and maintenance of aero engines':

http://www.tailwheel.nl/gen/rafflyingtrainingmanual/index.html

I realise that sounds rather 'dry', but it's very well written. Dates from 1937 apparently, but it does include variable pitch propellers...

For an easy to take-in introduction to everything, copy the sections of this document into word, print it out and read all of it:

http://ww2airfronts.org/Flight%20School/basics/lessons/...tes/cadet_note1.html

If you think at any time that maybe you'd like specific information on how to fly these planes, you could start here:

http://www.ww2aircraft.net/forum/other-mechanical-systems-tech/

You'll need to 'join' to download, but it's painless, and has interesting forums. Is 'forums' the plural of 'forum'?
Hme...

Good luck. Stick with it and you'll learn the inner secrets, stay cool (in a mechanical sense), gain confidence in your mount (whatever it is), and wonder what everyone else is banging on about with the whinein'-and-a-moanin'...

All praise to those who find these documents and make them freely available. The net is a wonderful thing...

steeldelete
02-10-2008, 03:45 PM
Wow, this is rather big! But very interesting. Thanks, thanks to all of you!

BadA1m
02-10-2008, 09:46 PM
Yeah, no kidding. It's bloody enormous; I've been at this for eight or so years and I still learn new stuff all the time.

Best advice I can give you is learn the basics: ie how aircraft in general work, basic maneuvers etc., then move on to master just one or two types that you like and you will have laid the foundation to move on to other planes.

Good flying M8!