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View Full Version : PACIFIC FIGHTERS Landing gear up/down



la1impala
03-02-2009, 10:19 PM
in Pacific fighters, IN controls for gear up/down it has "G". I press G and the landing gear does not come down. I configured manual gear up/down that works. I just have to keep pressing the key I configured for manual gear down. I would like to have the automatic gear down by pressing "G".

la1impala
03-02-2009, 10:19 PM
in Pacific fighters, IN controls for gear up/down it has "G". I press G and the landing gear does not come down. I configured manual gear up/down that works. I just have to keep pressing the key I configured for manual gear down. I would like to have the automatic gear down by pressing "G".

FoolTrottel
03-02-2009, 10:36 PM
Welcome here!

If you'd like to have the automatic gear down function, you'd better get into an aircraft that has one equipped.

The one you've been using probably does not have one (F4F-3 maybe?). It did not have one in real life, so it does not have one in PF.

Have Fun!

ImMoreBetter
03-02-2009, 10:36 PM
That depends on the plane you are flying.

The F4F, for example, does not have a motorized gear system, so the pilots would have to use a hand crank. Same as in this sim.

tagTaken2
03-03-2009, 12:58 AM
I wonder if anyone died as a result of the manual crank off a carrier?

Heavily loaded... wind drops as you flop off the runway... you sink closer and closer to the water cranking furiously and cursing Grumman for being cheap... your tire just touches a wavetop... splash one you!

Waldo.Pepper
03-03-2009, 02:26 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by tagTaken2:
I wonder if anyone died as a result of the manual crank off a carrier?

Heavily loaded... wind drops as you flop off the runway... you sink closer and closer to the water cranking furiously and cursing Grumman for being cheap... your tire just touches a wavetop... splash one you! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

"We flew a few hours on Grumman Martlets. Handy little American fighters used with great effect on escort carriers. Their only drawback was the manually operated undercarriage, which was hell to wind up or down since the handle was on the right side of the cockpit, necessitating a change of hands on the joystick just at the crucial moments of take-off or landing. It was common knowledge that at least one pilot had wound himself straight into the ground.

One of our ex-Pensacola boys was Dennis Hillyard who, when we first joined up, had seemed little more than a child, having come into the Service straight from Ampleforth. I like to think that I was in some small way responsible for his growing up for, whilst we were at Pensacola, I seemed to spend a fair amount of time rousing him from his bed, forcibly making him wash and shave and make his bed before breakfast; generally keeping him out of trouble. He must have paid a fair bit of attention to 'Uncle Norman' for he was now a smart young man, looking every inch the dashing young naval officer in his brand-new Midshipman's uniform. Alas! He was all too soon to die a tragic death in the North African landings and I still bemoan the loss of a good friend.

He was, thank God, still full of fun, life and vigour on the morning he first took up a Martlet. The small wheel which controlled the rudder trimming tab had, under its perspex cover, an indicator showing the number of degrees of rudder trim in use. The snag was that, as the wheel was turned to the right, the indicator turned to the left—all very confusing. And you certainly needed a rudder trim on the Martlet for, as its engine surged on to full power, the torque to the left hit you like a brick.

So Dennis carefully put on six degrees of right rudder trim. But when the indicator turned to the left, he was scathing in his thoughts about the Grumman Aircraft Company of Bethpage, Long Island. So he turned the wheel back until the indicator showed—or appeared to show—six degrees of right rudder trim.

Off he went down the runway. As the power built up, no mortal man could have withstood the pressure. The aircraft, just clear of the ground, did an acute turn to port of about 130 degrees and came tearing back across the airfield at about 20 feet. Hillyard, understandably, was still in the 'office', busily winding up that infernal undercarriage. I doubt if at this juncture he had noticed anything untoward.
Now a certain young man—and I sincerely hope he has long since recovered and is now fit and well in his old age—was driving across the grass a petrol bowser which was adorned with a wooden mast bearing a large yellow flag, specifically designed to warn off people like Dennis. The pilot, however, was still trying to work things out and wasn't paricularly worried about ground obstacles. The aircraft roared over the petrol bowser, almost decapitating the driver and removing mast and flag with the still partially-extended undercarriage. The staff in the control tower, looking down from their lofty eminence on this amazing scene, unanimously agreed that they had never seen the likes of it."

From - Carrier Pilot by Norman Hanson. Pages 62-64. One of my all time favorite books. Norman Hanson flew Corsairs off the Illustrious. The very first thing he did when he laid eyes on the Corsair was to write his will. Hanson explains - "I saw no reason why a Corsair shouldn't kill me when it could so obviously kill so many other lads without any trouble."

tagTaken2
03-03-2009, 03:16 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Classic. It's always entertaining reading accounts of training, particularly long ago. Perhaps it's the attitude of the survivors, or the perspective of age, but many accounts seem very cavalier about procedures, or even basic safety. Jump in- these three are important, ignore the rest- off you go http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

DKoor
03-03-2009, 03:28 AM
http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o125/DKoor/il2/total_newbie.jpg

Fledermaus578
03-03-2009, 04:05 AM
I don't know on how many other planes this is modelled for, but...
Often when trying to land a shot up Bf110, the automatic landing gear doesn't function, and the wheels must be "cranked" down manually.

Choctaw111
03-03-2009, 06:32 AM
If no one mentioned this before, look for "Gear Up" and "Gear Down" in the controls menu. There you will be able to set keys that you have to press multiple times to fully raise or lower the undercarriage...to simulate all the cranking the pilot had to do.

Skarphol
03-03-2009, 08:05 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Waldo.Pepper:
[... necessitating a change of hands on the joystick ...]
From - Carrier Pilot by Norman Hanson. Pages 62-64. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I've never heard a WWII pilot calling the stick a "joystick" before...

Skarphol

R_Target
03-03-2009, 10:01 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by tagTaken2:
I wonder if anyone died as a result of the manual crank off a carrier?

Heavily loaded... wind drops as you flop off the runway... you sink closer and closer to the water cranking furiously and cursing Grumman for being cheap... your tire just touches a wavetop... splash one you! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'm sure it happened to a few. It doesn't have anything to do with being cheap though-there was no room to fit a hydraulic gear system in the F4F. The chain driven crank system was carried over from earlier FF, F2F, and F3F fighters. I've also read of the crank slipping and slamming pilots in the arm with considerable force, and of radio leads getting wound up in the crank.

With it's narrow, spongy gear, the Wildcat also developed a reputation as a ground-looper. The landing gear was one of the primary reasons for building a new fighter instead of putting a more powerful engine in the F4F. I guess it was better than nothing. On the F2A-3, the landing gear just collapsed.

WTE_Galway
03-03-2009, 03:33 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Fledermaus578:
I don't know on how many other planes this is modelled for, but...
Often when trying to land a shot up Bf110, the automatic landing gear doesn't function, and the wheels must be "cranked" down manually. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Interesting the he111 historically had the opposite problem, when the hydraulics got shot up the gear lowered itself. It was a very common report by RAF pilots during the BoB.

Presumbably it was a failsafe under the assumption that gear locking down in an emergency was better than up.

This quirk of the Heinkels is not modelled in IL2.

DuxCorvan
03-05-2009, 12:56 PM
In the I-16, gear would often jam and could only be released by cutting some cable... they had a special set of scissors for that in the pit.

I've read it from SCW accounts.

crucislancer
03-05-2009, 04:15 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Fledermaus578:
I don't know on how many other planes this is modelled for, but...
Often when trying to land a shot up Bf110, the automatic landing gear doesn't function, and the wheels must be "cranked" down manually. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I had it happen in an SBD-3 once as well. Of course, I was so badly damaged that I was only able to wind down my port gear. But it was fun!

I still find it surprising that there were so many essencial functions that didn't have keyboard bindings to start with, like the manual gear keys and chocks. For how awesome this game is, sometimes little things like that come up that just don't make sense.

Swivet
03-05-2009, 07:31 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by DKoor:
http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o125/DKoor/il2/total_newbie.jpg </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


LOL....good one!!------This should be posted in response to half the threads here. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

Tully__
03-07-2009, 08:43 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by crucislancer:
I still find it surprising that there were so many essencial functions that didn't have keyboard bindings to start with, like the manual gear keys and chocks. For how awesome this game is, sometimes little things like that come up that just don't make sense. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You'll find that most of the essential controls that don't have a default assignment were added to the sim in one of the add-ons, they didn't exist in the original IL2 Sturmovik release in 2001. The developers had a choice of possibly conflicting with custom key bindings used by players upgrading from the old version or leaving them blank to be user assigned. They chose the latter.

crucislancer
03-07-2009, 08:48 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Tully__:
You'll find that most of the essential controls that don't have a default assignment were added to the sim in one of the add-ons, they didn't exist in the original IL2 Sturmovik release in 2001. The developers had a choice of possibly conflicting with custom key bindings used by players upgrading from the old version or leaving them blank to be user assigned. They chose the latter. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ah. Well, that makes sense.