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View Full Version : New Guinea, 4th Kokugun vs. 5th Air Force........



LEBillfish
09-26-2005, 11:27 PM
Hi All;

Been picking up more and more material on New Guinea including some awesome reports on equipment...ex. Parafrags are roughly 23# bombs yet they also made Para"demo" bombs ranging from 100-500#?.....Much of this coming from Air Force Historical Books/University (and with great pics!!).....So anyone up for wanting to know more on what went on there?

Here is a partial book list I've been using most of it focussed on the Ki-61 & the 78th Hikousentai and all they encountered (5th AF)...

J.I.Long's Airtell Research Report #99-3 Ki-61/100 Serial Numbers, Dates of Assembly & Characteristics
J.I.Long's Airtell Field Notes Japanese Army Fighter "Tony"
J.I.Long's Airtell Research Report #86-1 Estimated Assembly Date For A WWII Japanese Aircraft/A Relic of the Air War over New Guinea/Type 3 Fighter Tony # 640
J.I.Long's A PacFront Extra, Cockpit Layout- Type 3 Fighter Model 1
J.I.Long's Airtell Letter Report Correspondence w/ R.E.Cowley (Japanese inline engine comparisons)
J.I.Long's Airtell Letter Report Correspondence w/K.Weeks (Type 3 Fighter Reference Drawings)

R.M.Bueschell's Hein
R.M.Bueschell's Hayabusa
Rene J. Francillon, Aircraft Profile "The Kawasaki Ki-61 Hien" #118
Artur Juszcak, Mitsubishi A6m Zero
T. Januszewski, Mitsubishi A5M Claude, Mushroom Model
Avions #119, Ki-44 Shoki...French
Avions #122, Tateo Kato...French
Aero Detail #29 Hayabusa...
Monografie Lotnicze #5 Hien...Polish
Monografie Lotnicze #48 Ki-43...Polish
Maru Mechanic #43? Nik1/2....Japanese
F.A.O.W #17 Hien...Japanese
F.A.O.W. #19 Army Type 4 Fighter "Hayate"...Japanese
F.A.O.W. #21 Army Type 2 Fighter "Toryu"...Japanese
F.A.O.W. #27 Type 96 Carrier Fighter, A5M, Nate...Japanese
F.A.O.W. #29 Type 97 Fighter... Japanese
F.A.O.W. #32 Type 97 Carrier Torpedo Bomber, B5n, Kate...Japanese
F.A.O.W. #33 Type 99 Carrier Dive Bomber, D3A, Val...Japanese
F.A.O.W. # 53 Kyofu, Shinden, Shidenkai...Japanese
F.A.O.W. # 65 Type 1 Fighter, Hayabusa...Japanese
Mechanism of Military Aircraft #2, Ki-61 & Ki-48...Japanese
Mechanism of Military Aircraft #6, Ki-45 & Ki-51...Japanese
Mechanism of Military Aircraft #?, E13A1, Jake...Japanese "Partial"

Fraus, 1939-45 Fighters & Bombers of the Japanese Air Force Part 1...Polish
Fraus, 1939-45 Fighters & Bombers of the Japanese Air Force Part 2....Polish
Peter Scott's Emblems of the Rising Sun (IJAAF Markings)
D.W. Thorpe JAAF Camoflauge & Markings WWII...
ModelArt 533, Camouflage & Markings of the IJA Bombers ....Japanese
ModelArt 272, Camouflage & Markings of IJN Fighters .......Japanese
Robert C. Mikesh, Schiffer Publishing, Japanese Aircraft Equipment 1940-1945
Unknown (Japanese), Japanese Military Aircraft Illustrated...Japanese
Koku Fan, 1974-3

Army Air Force Historical Study #113
Army Air Force Historical Study #116
Aeronotes 3, Deployments & OOBs
Aeronotes 4, New Guinea Area Operations
Shindo Hiriyuki, Japanese Air Operations in New Guinea
Capt. B. Chance Saltzman & T.R. Searle's, Introduction to the United States Air Force
Gary Null's, Weapon of Denial, Air Power & the Battle for New Guinea
Major James A. Barr, Airpower Employment of the 5th Air Force in the WWII SouthWest Pacific Theatre
Maj. T.D.Gann, Fifth Air Force Light & Medium Bomber Operations During 1942 & 1943: Building Doctrine & Forces That Triumphed In the Battle of the Bismark Sea & the Wewak Raid
Maj. Michael E. Fischer, Mission Type Orders in Joint Air Operations (Command and control, New Guinea highlighted)
W.J. English, Performance of B25 Aircraft of 38th Bomb Group During 18 Months of Combat in New Guinea
Major Jonathan B. Wills, How SouthWest Pacific Area Operations Influenced the Royal Austrailian Air Force
Roy S. Weaver Jr., I'm in the Army Now.......New Guinea info
The Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, United States Navy, U.S. Naval Aviation in the Pacific
United States Naval Aviation 1910-1995, Part 5 WWII
David Osborb Scott, Completing the Circle Around Rabaul, The Siezure of the Admiralties, Feb.- May 1944
Mr. James C. Sawruk, Air-to-Air Claims and Credits for Navy and Marine Corps Patrol Type Aircraft During World War II
Master Sgt. Greg Henneman, Capt. Nelson Flack: The rediscovery of a Black Sheep.....Article

H. Sakaida's Aces of the Rising sun
Hata, Izawa, Shores, Japanese Army Air Force Fighter Units and Their Aces 1931 - 1945
K. Janowicz's/Kagero 68th Sentai
Waldemar Pajdosz & Andre Zbiegniewski's/Kagero, 3/202 Kokutai
Saburo Hayashi & Alvin D Coox, Kogun, The Japanese Army in the Pacific War
Dainippon Kaiga Publ., Imperial Japanese Army Air Units Battlefield Photograph Collection
Capt. M.K.Rodman's, A War of their Own, Bombers Over the Southwest Pacific
L.McAulay's MacArthur's Eagles: The U. S. Air War over New Guinea, 1943-1944
L.J.Hickey, Warpath Across the Pacific, 345th Bomb Group, "Air Apaches"

Trying to Obtain:
L.J.Hickey, Taylor, Tagaya, Revenge of the Red Raiders, 22nd Bomb Group, "Red Raiders"
L.J.Hickey, Taylor, Tagaya, Kens Men Against the Empire, 43rd Bomb Group, "Kens Men"
L.J.Hickey, Claringbould, Rampage of the Roarin 20's, 312th Bomb Group, "Roarin 20's"
L.J.Hickey, Tagaya, Saga of the Sun Setters, 38th Bomb Group, "Sun Setters"
Model Art 263 & 428, Ki-61 & Ki-61/Ki-100
Maru Mechanic 2 & 37 Ki-61 & Ki-61/Ki-100
F.A.O.W. "Blue Series" #98
Watanabe Yohji's, Hien: the Struggle of the Type 3 Fighter
Jiro Kimata's Rikugun Koku Senshi
Nihon Kokuki Soshyu, Vol. 4 Kawasaki
Nihon Kokuki Soshyu, Vol. 5 Nakajima
Gakken Series, No.???? - Ki-61
Gakken Series, No.7 - RABAUL AIR WAR
Gakken Series, No.28 - IJN/IJA/American Bases
Gakken Series, No.52 - Nakajima Type 1 Fighter, Hayabusa
Airview #???? Ki-61
MILITARY AIRCRAFT #16, Imperial Japanese Army Aircraft of the Pacific War

ElAurens
09-26-2005, 11:39 PM
Thanks for all the hard work Billfish.

Tater-SW-
09-27-2005, 09:16 AM
Yeah, parademos were quite common. They had delay fuses as well, the paras were not only to brake the bomb so the plane could get out of blast range, but partially to keep them froom bouncing up into the plane that dropped it from what I have read (mentioned quite a bit in Warpath Across the Pacific).

tater

LEBillfish
09-27-2005, 10:05 AM
The Missing Ordinance:
(know I am no expert on U.S. ordinance, yet some info I ran across)

The following information is from many sources, yet the lions share of this segment comes from "Capt. M.K.Rodman's, A War of their Own, Bombers Over the Southwest Pacific".....An excellent read that goes into great detail as to the 5th Air Force Bombers and their various configurations, weapons and tactics. (lots and lots on ship bombing as well).

Missing Japanese Bombs:

Though weapon creativity seemed to be lacking mostly due to the light loadouts and inferior planes of the Japanese Army and Navy, one weapon is sorely missing here. That being the "Anti-Bomber Phosphorous Bomb".

Though I am trying to gather more detailed information (and at this time is sketchy so not to be considered accurate), essentially the bomb I believe came in 30 & 50kg constructions and came in 2 types. Sticks of incendiaries bound together would be dropped into a formation of bombers. The first type would break up in the fall spreading out...The second would drop as a bundle then discharge casting out the sticks before their detonation.

The effects due to accuracy were iffy at best. Though documented losses of B25's, 24's, 17's, & 29's are known.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/Phosphorous_Bomb.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/Phosphorousbomb.jpg

They were also used in New Guinea toward the end of the conflict......(as a side note, before Kamikaze against ships and Taiatari (bomber ramming) were known or used over the home islands, they were actually extensively used in New Guinea though no doubt some accidents claimed to be the "ultimate sacrifice").

Missing U.S. Medium Bomber Gun Configurations:

We have many of them as AI, yet sadly some of the most extensively used aircraft in New Guinea are missing from the sim. Most notably the various B-25's who's strafing and anti-shipping efforts really are what won the air war in New Guinea/Britain.

Naturally the nose filled with .50 caliber guns guns is what did most of the work, yet others with various cannons also contributed greatly. Though we all know of the B25-G with the 75mm gun, they also came with lighter cannons and all had their place.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/B25Gdwg.jpg

Yet there was more. B25's, A-20's and A-26's also carried a vast array of rockets, cannon, and machine gun armaments that truly contributed to the "precision" attacks these aircraft were used for vs. the almost "high altitude" role relegated to here.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/A20-rockets.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/A26-guns.jpg

These planes till simply equipped properly are far from how they were really used.

Missing U.S. Bombs, the criticals:

So the B-25 & A-20 are to be bombers, ok lets talk bombs. One of the more notable missing and simple to have is Napalm. Though not used till the end of the campaign, it never the less was by both to actually much more effective ends then phosphorous type weapons (though they are sorely missing discussed next)....Napalm toward the end of the war became quite a mainstay for most direct ground attack aircraft. The B25 & A20 no exception.

Phosphorous bombs however were much more then what we give them credit for here. Initially using smoke generating bombs...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/phosphorous-bomb.jpg

Quickly it was discovered the devastating effect they could have on men, equipment and buildings...which from the book above the author notes "Their construction was simple. The €œ€˜Kenney Cocktail€ . . .was a standard M-47 100-pound bomb loaded with white phosphorus which, when it burst, flung out streamers of
burning incendiary material in all directions for 150 feet [fig. 7]. Its effect upon man and machine was deadly.€50 Even before the end of 1942, €œthe Beast,€ as Radio Tokyo dubbed Kenney
and his air force, would give the Japanese in the Southwest Pacific more cause for concern."

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/pre1_topl.jpg

Often detonated above the ground, the white hot debris would actually cut through man and machine setting all it came in contact with afire.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/pre1_botr.jpg

Phosphorous bombs were used extensively in New Guinea, and a dab of burning phosphorous on a fuel truck, plane or hut could often totally destroy it.

However, being we are destined to be medium to high alt bombers, where is the real weapon used by all medium and heavy bombers that really had the lions share of effect. The "Daisy Cutter" as quoted from the book above:

"Fifth Air Force modified larger bombs from those on hand to create weapons known as daisy cutters. €œTo cut up aircraft on the ground we had wrapped these bombs [300 lb. and 500 lb.]
with heavy steel wire, and we dropped them with instantaneous fuses on the end of a six-inch pipe extension in the nose. They looked good. The wire, which was nearly one-quarter inch in diameter, broke up into pieces from six inches to a couple of feet long, and in the monstration it cut limbs off trees a hundred feet away which were two inches thick.€51 Unlike
well-constructed industrial complexes, exposed targets in the open did not necessarily require attacks by large formations of bombers laden with high-explosive bombs. Smaller fragments proved more than enough to ignite aircraft and machinery as well as absolutely devour ground personnel unlucky enough to be within the fragmentation pattern."

These weapons though average in actual weight are noted to literally clear 150 yard diameter swaths taking out everything within it's radius. Dropped in combinations of instantly detonating to some lingering up to 48 hours to keep crews clear of the airfields, they if you read any amount of information were used almost as extensively as standard bomb loads.

However, we do have one actual saving grace, the Parafrag.....Or do we?

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/parafragbomb.jpg

The parafrag was used extensively by B-25 crews (as they strafed) to great effect. Initially B-25's having to remove their belly turret to utilize an "internal drop tank" for fuel taking up space caused other innovations to be made to make the best use of loadouts....We I believe get 40 parafrags....Yet here is a description of a system used to drop them and spread them out......

"To facilitate the use of these weapons, Pappy Gunn €œcame up with the €˜squirrel cage€ for the B-25. This was a metal rack that looked just like a cage with columns of rods. It held parafrags in fours stacked on top of the other, nose to tail. I recall that the cage carried about 200 23 pounders and the idea was that when you were over a target you toggled the whole lot.€42 By late August 1942, planes from the 3d BG were equipped with bomb racks for parafrags, and less than a month later, these bombs made their first operational appearance".

200.....

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/parafrag-sally.jpg

One important aspect of this was the parafrag often tended to not go off (the problem made worse later by parademo's (next part)). Though the fuse sometimes failed to work, the effect the parafrag had on the New Guinea Air operations cannot be overstated.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/parafrag-dud.jpg

Better fuses made, the parafrag became a mainstay and inspired even larger parachute restraining bombs...the Parademo's.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/parafragfuse.jpg

Parademo's;

With the success the Parafrag had, we all know bigger must be better right? So soon larger weapons were produced with explosive force not fragments or burning phosphorous being the key. So as noted below using what was learned from Parafrags, Parademo's were made.....

"Starting in August 1943, with the idea of preventing ricochet of bombs by means of a parachute, [and] a parachute adapter capable of field production . . .[the parademo] was developed and first used on a combat mission in September 1943.€12 The fact that parademos took their parachutes directly from 23-pound parafrags simplified the process of creating a new weapon. A 100-pound bomb had one chute; the 250-pound version carried two; and the 500-pounder carried either two or four of the standard tail-mounted chutes. Developed late in the summer of 1943."

As noted coming in 100#

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/100parademo.jpg

250#

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/250parademo-1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/250parademo-2.jpg

& 500# configurations,

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/500parademo.jpg

The parademos were designed to work both like parafrags & or Daisy Cutters. Sometimes instantaneous fuses used, the parachute besides granting accuracy and allowing the bomb to drop straight down to avoid bouncing off revetments, they were sometimes timed for long delays as well.

Unfortunately they had their own teething problems with fuses....Quite often failing till understood why...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/Kaytoo/NewGuinea/parademo-dud.jpg

Yet eventually moving to contact fuses, the parademo now had the same low level accuracy as the parafrag without worry of being fragged by your own bomb or worse still having it bounce back up skipping and bite you (which had happened).


We love our fighters here, and seem to love those low level fights. The missing ordinance for both sides is almost required to the precise ground attack theme of IL2 Sturmovik, and to make the combat here like so many like it to be. A low alt brawl.

Oddly, that's just how it often was in New Guinea.

Art-J
09-27-2005, 11:00 AM
Lots of interesting and precious info... especially the close-up photos. Thanks, BillFish! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

LEBillfish
10-01-2005, 10:35 AM
A New Guinea Spitfire....Tell me the RAAF are not "shark looney" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

http://www.oldcmp.net/Images/Aircraft/NGSpit.jpg

Tater-SW-
10-01-2005, 01:09 PM
Yeah, I'd make a B-25 campaign in a heartbeat, but it would be pointless, none of the bombers in game can bomb at appropriately low altitude.

tater

sledgehammer2
10-02-2005, 12:31 AM
Billfish, I would really like to find some of the books you have listed... some of the more well known ones I have but there is alot in your list I don't have. I am always looking to increase my library on JNAF and JAAF literature.

I tried to search some of the authors names on amazon.com, where I get most of my books, but the ssearch came up empty. Thanks for all the hard work and any help.

Sledgehammer2

LEBillfish
10-02-2005, 08:46 AM
Like which books?......Some are technical reports not publically available used to make all the books you read, others declassified USAAC reports, still others published thesis posted by the USAF University. Many you'll discover as well are only available in Japan.


Originally posted by sledgehammer2:
Billfish, I would really like to find some of the books you have listed... some of the more well known ones I have but there is alot in your list I don't have. I am always looking to increase my library on JNAF and JAAF literature.

I tried to search some of the authors names on amazon.com, where I get most of my books, but the ssearch came up empty. Thanks for all the hard work and any help.

Sledgehammer2

sledgehammer2
10-02-2005, 10:54 AM
OK, I'll pick 2 for starters... Shindo Hiriyuki's "Japanese Air Operations in New Guinea" and Capt M K Rodman's "A War of Their Own, Bombers Over the SW Pacific". Sorry I wasn't more specific.

LEBillfish
11-09-2005, 07:15 PM
Bump.............Where's our 207 parafrag loadout?

LEBillfish
11-09-2005, 07:17 PM
Originally posted by sledgehammer2:
OK, I'll pick 2 for starters... Shindo Hiriyuki's "Japanese Air Operations in New Guinea" and Capt M K Rodman's "A War of Their Own, Bombers Over the SW Pacific". Sorry I wasn't more specific.

ah and both of those are PDF's

Feathered_IV
11-10-2005, 05:48 AM
You can get them on PDF?! Any clues as to where?

I'm always trawling the stores for IJN/IJAAF books. Shindo Hiriyuki's book would be an amazing find.

LEBillfish, can't thank you enough for your tireless efforts http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

Feathered_IV
11-11-2005, 02:57 AM
Additional:

LEBillfish, I was wondering if you have heard of the Japanese wartime movie "Kato Hayabusa Sentotai"?

I've seen stills from the film but have not found out if it is available. Or indeed, if it actually survived the war.

If you have seen it could you let me know?

Cheers!

LEBillfish
11-11-2005, 09:05 AM
It's just chapter 3, and many of the publications above are "legally" available for download by searching google (heh, found even more by searching most government reports)

http://ajrp.awm.gov.au/ajrp/ajrp2.nsf/WebI/Chapters/$fi...ter3.pdf?OpenElement (http://ajrp.awm.gov.au/ajrp/ajrp2.nsf/WebI/Chapters/$file/Chapter3.pdf?OpenElement)

http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/aupress/Books/Rodman/rodman.pdf

http://www.maxwell.af.mil/au/aul/aupress/SAAS_Theses/SAASS_Out/Gann/gann.pdf

http://research.airuniv.edu/papers/ay1997/acsc/97-0609A.pdf

https://www.airforcehistory.hq.af.mil/Publications/full...weapon_of_denial.pdf (https://www.airforcehistory.hq.af.mil/Publications/fulltext/weapon_of_denial.pdf)

http://research.airuniv.edu/papers/ay1997/acsc/97-0535.pdf

http://www.history.navy.mil/avh-1910/PART05.PDF

http://www.pacificwrecks.com/history/b25pre.pdf

http://etd-submit.etsu.edu/etd/theses/available/etd-070...ed/ScottD072704f.pdf (http://etd-submit.etsu.edu/etd/theses/available/etd-0708104-142302/unrestricted/ScottD072704f.pdf)

http://www.rweaver.com/war/war.pdf

http://www.history.navy.mil/download/pacific.pdf

hehe.....do your own searches, you'll be shocked at the information "publically" available on any topic....Naturally, you must carefully determine though what it is.....

Is it Propaganda?
Is it a document of opinion?
Is it a document to influence ones own superiors
Is it a collection of facts?

This goes for any book, paper, artical, report....Yet as you begin to collect the info on YOUR specific subject, soon you'll find certain aspects are so unique it raises questions, others consistant...yet some insightful.

In kind do related searches......My research deals with 1 thing, the 78th Hikousentai. Yet to learn that I must research the 14th Hikoudan, 4th Kokugun, the Ki-61 to learn why the 78th had certain problems, then lastly their opponents the 5th Air Force.....and you'd be shocked at how sometimes you can find the best info and photo's by researching the "opposite side of the coin"......For me the 5th AirForce.

So in the end I suspect I'll know a bit about Ki-61's & 43's, the 4th Kokugun its equipment and men, the 5th Air Force and their planes and men......All to learn of a little known unit that was wiped out in a year of combat....Yet ypu've already seen how much I'm learning of the Ki-61.

So pick a subject that excites you....find all you can on it then expand....In the end, you might if say researching the same as me find yourself an expert on Japanese and Allied Aircraft & units including all air operations in New Guinea and the surrounding area's.

I'll never be that expert, yet I'm learning each day........Have to go read my new papers now and expand my reference list http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

redfeathers1948
11-11-2005, 09:12 AM
geeeeze Lebillfish I been reading about WWII
since I was a baby my pappy was with the 1st Marines starting at Guadacanal and I aint never seen this kind of info. Best book I have is 'Warpath Across the Pacific'-Lawrence J Hickey about the 345 Air Apaches.Well done http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

LEBillfish
11-11-2005, 09:15 AM
Originally posted by Feathered_IV:
Additional:

LEBillfish, I was wondering if you have heard of the Japanese wartime movie "Kato Hayabusa Sentotai"?

I've seen stills from the film but have not found out if it is available. Or indeed, if it actually survived the war.

If you have seen it could you let me know?

Cheers!

What I'd suggest again is a google search, there are tons of websites that speak of it, some claiming to offer it....I'd just shoot off an email to them and see if they have it, if not contact http://www.arawasi.jp/

http://www.archivdvd.org/

LEBillfish
11-11-2005, 09:16 AM
Originally posted by redfeathers1948:
geeeeze Lebillfish I been reading about WWII
since I was a baby my pappy was with the 1st Marines starting at Guadacanal and I aint never seen this kind of info. Best book I have is 'Warpath Across the Pacific'-Lawrence J Hickey about the 345 Air Apaches.Well done http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Well I started doing this when PF came out....so a year, but am in a special situation http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Tater-SW-
11-11-2005, 10:36 AM
Unfortunately, Hickey's other books have not seen the light of day. They seem to be still awaited (as of 2003 anyway), but some of the vets were getting a bit mad at him because many documents he has are loaned from them. There are 4 more books in his "soon to be released" website dated 1997. I'm not holding my breath, but it's sad because Warpath is so very very good.

tater

LEBillfish
11-11-2005, 11:49 AM
Originally posted by Tater-SW-:
Unfortunately, Hickey's other books have not seen the light of day. They seem to be still awaited (as of 2003 anyway), but some of the vets were getting a bit mad at him because many documents he has are loaned from them. There are 4 more books in his "soon to be released" website dated 1997. I'm not holding my breath, but it's sad because Warpath is so very very good.

tater

Warpath is IMLTHO a rediculous amount of info. Could have really been broken up into 4 books itself......If the others are like it I'll be floored.

My husband picked up Warpath across the Pacific for me just last week....(tell me your spouses are like my hottie man on encouraging you http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif)...Anywho, he spoke with them directly and unless I misunderstood they were talking end of this year or maybe it was 2006.

You'll not they have added authors, from what Brad was told to help Hickey out the info if the same as warpath overwhelming.

Here's the direct site.....

http://www.irandpcorp.com/index.html

Tater-SW-
11-11-2005, 01:01 PM
Yeah I'd buy all of them tomorrow if they were out, regardless of price.

tater

Feathered_IV
11-11-2005, 05:38 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Feathered_IV:
Additional:

LEBillfish, I was wondering if you have heard of the Japanese wartime movie "Kato Hayabusa Sentotai"?

I've seen stills from the film but have not found out if it is available. Or indeed, if it actually survived the war.

If you have seen it could you let me know?

Cheers!


What I'd suggest again is a google search, there are tons of websites that speak of it, some claiming to offer it....I'd just shoot off an email to them and see if they have it, if not contact http://www.arawasi.jp/

http://www.archivdvd.org/

Thanks, I have been using google of course and I'm on its trail. I was just jumping the gun a bit to try an see if you had watched it personally http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

SkyChimp
11-11-2005, 09:00 PM
If you want good information on Japanese ordnance, I recommend the following tech manuals:

TM 9-1985-4 Japanese Explosive Ordnance (Bombs, Bomb Fuzes, Land Mine, Grenades, Firing Devices and Sabotage Devices)(March 1953); 263 pages, 200 illus. Price 32.00 Vol 1 of 2

TM 9-1985-5 Japanese Explosive Ordnance (Army Ammunition, Navy Ammunition)(March 1953); 287 pages, 251 illus. Price 34.00 {Item No.3773} Vol 2 of 2

I didn't see these on your list of references. You can buy copies here:

http://www.military-info.com/Index.htm

LEBillfish
11-12-2005, 06:48 AM
No Feathered I have personally never seen it, and will look into them SkyChimp http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif