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View Full Version : Your Ju-87 D5 and You



pendragon1984
01-01-2005, 10:46 PM
In the couple months that I've been here and the weeks prior to that when I lurked a bit, I've seen more than one thread pop up where someone expresses confusion over proper use of the Ju-87 D5's divebomb sight, and mostly the response is "Hmm, I'm not sure myself, either. Any divebomb experts want to help us out?" Mostly there are a couple of messages varying that theme, then everyone goes back to flying the previous models of Stuka, since they don't have any knobs to fiddle with AND they still have those uber-cool dive sirens on their brakes!

Now, I'm hardly an "expert" with any of the planes I'm trying to become proficient with, much less the Stuka. I do, however, get a good amount of enjoyment out of effectively flying what some would call "the most recognizable aircraft of WWII" (my first campaign in FB was with a German Stuka squadron), and decided to dedicate some of this time to figuring out the bombsight on the D5. As I would learn, when properly employed this device provides a devastating advantage, and accuracy so pinpoint I feel I could almost drop a 250kg bomb directly into the cockpit of a grounded plane if I had to. I trust the bombsight on that plane more than I do the gunsight, if that tells you anything. Here, then, is my attempt at giving something back to the community: a mini-tutorial for the Junkers Ju-87 D5.

The D5 is perhaps the quintessential ground attack plane for the Axis powers, and one that I would gladly match up against any Sturmovik ace. It has an impressive bombload capability, a sleek and streamlined profile, and unlike its predecessors carries a pair of cannon in the wings, rather than light machine guns. The true ace up its heavily-armored sleeve, however, is the dual-purpose gunsight and divebomb pipper.

You'll want to start out high in the D5, simply because you can. Where the previous models were ideal when starting an attack from 2000 meters or so, the bombsight on the D5 provides accurate delivery at much higher altitudes. My lowest bomb runs tend to start at 3000m, with bomb release at 1000.

As you are lined up and heading toward your target, begin making preparations for your attack. You'll want a coarse prop pitch to keep your airspeed from climbing too high, and it will be helpful if you trim your nose up a few degrees. Next, dial in the altitude at which you want to release your ordnance. I reccomend at least 1500 meters below your present altitude to give yourself enough time to acquire your target. If you have "AB" bombs, set your altitude a bit lower than you otherwise would to prevent your carpet of explosives from dispersing too far. Never set a release of less than 500 meters above ground level, and if you're diving down below, say 750, I reccomend setting a delay of at least 2-5 seconds on your explosives. Remember that you'll probably be leveling out about 400 meters or more below the point at which you drop your bombs.

If you're planning a vertical bomb run, there's little need to dial in your airspeed. It won't affect precision much if your dive angle is greater than 70 degrees. For shallower dives, however, set what you expect your true airspeed to be at the release altitude in kilometers per hour. You'll have to get a feel for how much speed you'll get in a dive, but a good rule of thumb is a gain of 50 km/hr per 500 meters in steeper dives.

Fly your course and acquire your target through the floor window, if your bomb isn't so big that it blocks your view. For a 90 degree bomb run, don't start your dive the moment you see the target. Let it pass back out of view and estimate when it's directly under the center of your plane. At this point, wing over like you're about to roll into a split-s and risk a glance at your target. If your wingtip is pointing at it, go ahead and invert your aircraft. If not, level out, fly on for a few heartbeats, and try again.

Once you're inverted, switch to "gunsight" view (Shift + F1), idle the engine back to 0% throttle, and look directly "up" through the canopy (i.e. down at the ground). Once you've got your target almost in the center of the screen, activate your dive brake and start your run.

Pull back on the stick until you've got the target dead in your gunsight -- careful, the bombsight is a bulky piece of hardware and will obscure your target for a couple seconds (perhaps its only real disadvantage) -- and look to your right to check the dive angle indicator. If you're in a "negative" dive (meaning if your belly is closer to the horizon than your canopy) roll your wings 180 degrees. The bombload will not release if you're pulling negative G's, which is another part of the reason I told you to trim your pitch up a bit... the Stuka wants to pull "down" naturally and requires a bit of stickwork to keep it pointed at the target if you don't trim.

Thanks to the sophisticated bombsight, you don't have to be in a perfect 90 degree dive, but get as close as you can. You should see a bowtie-shaped pipper climbing up the bottom of your stuvi. This is where the dive sight thinks your bombs will land based on the altitude and airspeed you've dialed in, as well as your dive angle. Do NOT release your bombs immediately. Remember that it's calculating based on the altitude you put in... if you release now you're likely to miss. Instead, just keep this moving pipper on your target for now. When your altimiter gets to the point you dialed in to the bombsight, you should hear a warning horn sound. At this point, hit your bomb release button (they don't auto-release like in previous models)... if you get it as the horn is sounding then all of your explosives should detach from the plane with a single press of the button. Your Stuka will begin to auto-level, but pull back on the stick a bit to help it out. Once you're level, throttle up, disengage the dive brake, and head for home... the boys back at the officer's club have a frosty mug with your name on it! If you need to, you can do some mop-up work with the wing cannons, but if you've done your job right this won't be neccessary.

Phew... hope that helps some folks out! If I get enough requests I can write a longer tutorial with screenshots, or even try my hand at a training track.

Viel Glück!

pendragon1984
01-01-2005, 10:46 PM
In the couple months that I've been here and the weeks prior to that when I lurked a bit, I've seen more than one thread pop up where someone expresses confusion over proper use of the Ju-87 D5's divebomb sight, and mostly the response is "Hmm, I'm not sure myself, either. Any divebomb experts want to help us out?" Mostly there are a couple of messages varying that theme, then everyone goes back to flying the previous models of Stuka, since they don't have any knobs to fiddle with AND they still have those uber-cool dive sirens on their brakes!

Now, I'm hardly an "expert" with any of the planes I'm trying to become proficient with, much less the Stuka. I do, however, get a good amount of enjoyment out of effectively flying what some would call "the most recognizable aircraft of WWII" (my first campaign in FB was with a German Stuka squadron), and decided to dedicate some of this time to figuring out the bombsight on the D5. As I would learn, when properly employed this device provides a devastating advantage, and accuracy so pinpoint I feel I could almost drop a 250kg bomb directly into the cockpit of a grounded plane if I had to. I trust the bombsight on that plane more than I do the gunsight, if that tells you anything. Here, then, is my attempt at giving something back to the community: a mini-tutorial for the Junkers Ju-87 D5.

The D5 is perhaps the quintessential ground attack plane for the Axis powers, and one that I would gladly match up against any Sturmovik ace. It has an impressive bombload capability, a sleek and streamlined profile, and unlike its predecessors carries a pair of cannon in the wings, rather than light machine guns. The true ace up its heavily-armored sleeve, however, is the dual-purpose gunsight and divebomb pipper.

You'll want to start out high in the D5, simply because you can. Where the previous models were ideal when starting an attack from 2000 meters or so, the bombsight on the D5 provides accurate delivery at much higher altitudes. My lowest bomb runs tend to start at 3000m, with bomb release at 1000.

As you are lined up and heading toward your target, begin making preparations for your attack. You'll want a coarse prop pitch to keep your airspeed from climbing too high, and it will be helpful if you trim your nose up a few degrees. Next, dial in the altitude at which you want to release your ordnance. I reccomend at least 1500 meters below your present altitude to give yourself enough time to acquire your target. If you have "AB" bombs, set your altitude a bit lower than you otherwise would to prevent your carpet of explosives from dispersing too far. Never set a release of less than 500 meters above ground level, and if you're diving down below, say 750, I reccomend setting a delay of at least 2-5 seconds on your explosives. Remember that you'll probably be leveling out about 400 meters or more below the point at which you drop your bombs.

If you're planning a vertical bomb run, there's little need to dial in your airspeed. It won't affect precision much if your dive angle is greater than 70 degrees. For shallower dives, however, set what you expect your true airspeed to be at the release altitude in kilometers per hour. You'll have to get a feel for how much speed you'll get in a dive, but a good rule of thumb is a gain of 50 km/hr per 500 meters in steeper dives.

Fly your course and acquire your target through the floor window, if your bomb isn't so big that it blocks your view. For a 90 degree bomb run, don't start your dive the moment you see the target. Let it pass back out of view and estimate when it's directly under the center of your plane. At this point, wing over like you're about to roll into a split-s and risk a glance at your target. If your wingtip is pointing at it, go ahead and invert your aircraft. If not, level out, fly on for a few heartbeats, and try again.

Once you're inverted, switch to "gunsight" view (Shift + F1), idle the engine back to 0% throttle, and look directly "up" through the canopy (i.e. down at the ground). Once you've got your target almost in the center of the screen, activate your dive brake and start your run.

Pull back on the stick until you've got the target dead in your gunsight -- careful, the bombsight is a bulky piece of hardware and will obscure your target for a couple seconds (perhaps its only real disadvantage) -- and look to your right to check the dive angle indicator. If you're in a "negative" dive (meaning if your belly is closer to the horizon than your canopy) roll your wings 180 degrees. The bombload will not release if you're pulling negative G's, which is another part of the reason I told you to trim your pitch up a bit... the Stuka wants to pull "down" naturally and requires a bit of stickwork to keep it pointed at the target if you don't trim.

Thanks to the sophisticated bombsight, you don't have to be in a perfect 90 degree dive, but get as close as you can. You should see a bowtie-shaped pipper climbing up the bottom of your stuvi. This is where the dive sight thinks your bombs will land based on the altitude and airspeed you've dialed in, as well as your dive angle. Do NOT release your bombs immediately. Remember that it's calculating based on the altitude you put in... if you release now you're likely to miss. Instead, just keep this moving pipper on your target for now. When your altimiter gets to the point you dialed in to the bombsight, you should hear a warning horn sound. At this point, hit your bomb release button (they don't auto-release like in previous models)... if you get it as the horn is sounding then all of your explosives should detach from the plane with a single press of the button. Your Stuka will begin to auto-level, but pull back on the stick a bit to help it out. Once you're level, throttle up, disengage the dive brake, and head for home... the boys back at the officer's club have a frosty mug with your name on it! If you need to, you can do some mop-up work with the wing cannons, but if you've done your job right this won't be neccessary.

Phew... hope that helps some folks out! If I get enough requests I can write a longer tutorial with screenshots, or even try my hand at a training track.

Viel Glück!

BlakJakOfSpades
01-01-2005, 10:49 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by pendragon1984:
Now, I'm hardly an "expert" <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
hardly, its a ju-87 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
good tutorial though

pendragon1984
01-01-2005, 10:54 PM
I know that. You know that. My fingers, though? They keep disagreeing http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

Edit: Fixed, thanks for pointing out my mistake. I've been flying Stukas since Air Warrior III, ya think I'd know better by now http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

FlatSpinMan
01-01-2005, 11:05 PM
Thanks for that. One question - how do I adjust the bomb release altitude? Same goes if anyone knows how to adjust the gunsight on other fighters.
Thanks.

pendragon1984
01-01-2005, 11:13 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by FlatSpinMan:
Thanks for that. One question - how do I adjust the bomb release altitude? Same goes if anyone knows how to adjust the gunsight on other fighters.
Thanks. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Set up the "Bombsight Controls" in the Controls menu. The D5 uses the "Increase/Decrease Bombsight Altitude" and "Increase/Decrease Bombsight Velocity" keys to make adjustments. As a side note, not everyone knows that you can also use the bombsight controls on the Gyro gunsight in the P-51 D20 for air-to-air purposes. (though you have to activate it with the "bombsight automation" key to get anything out of it!")

noshens
01-02-2005, 12:59 AM
great tutorial! I was too lazy to figure the gunsight by myself and waited for such a tutorial since AEP release http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif