PDA

View Full Version : Anybody else have a relative that served in the Navy in WWII?



Praetorian27
05-11-2005, 03:12 PM
My grandfather (who is still alive and well!) served in the Mediterranean Sea on PT Boat 556. He was the quartermaster and drove the boat. He has some crazy stories! Anyone else?

W.Irving
05-11-2005, 03:21 PM
I would love to read some of them!

Living in a country that was 'neutral' during the war, the only thing my grandfather did was guard rail transports of German troops.

My neighbour, though, used to be a pilot when the Swedish airforce was the third largest in the world. Flew Mustangs apparently.

Oh, and my ex girlfriend's grandfather fought against Franco.

..next! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

xRuddyx
05-11-2005, 03:34 PM
My grandfather served in the navy. His name was Arthur Perry. He was in the battle of North Africa. He used to tell me stories about it when I was kid, but that was some time ago and the stories have grown vague in my mind.

panthercules
05-11-2005, 04:06 PM
My father was US Navy - commanded a YP boat for a while stateside (trying to keep those pesky U-boats out of our harbors, among other things), then served as a beachmaster during the invasion of Okinawa in 1945

jbacon69
05-11-2005, 04:38 PM
Only navy person in the family was my great grandfather. He served on in both ww1 and 2. destroyers both times.

HeibgesU999
05-11-2005, 04:43 PM
I have 2 uncles who were in the u.s. navy in submarines at the end of the war, but neither of them saw combat.

scourtney2
05-11-2005, 05:07 PM
Last person in my family to be in the Navy was my Grandfather, who served on a Balao submarine in the Pacific in WW2. It was the USS Carbonero, SS 337. They never had to fire a torpedo but sank many ships with gunfire.

The next person in my family to be in the Navy will be myself when I report to the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis on June 29th.

seawolf869
05-11-2005, 05:33 PM
My Great-Uncle was on the USS Nevada during the Pearl Harbor attack. He served the rest of the war on the destroyer USS Saufley.

If anyone wants/needs info on a relative's ship, and does not have access to research materials, let me know.

Xasher
05-11-2005, 08:25 PM
My grandfather served in ww2 in the Coast guard and ended his service in the army air corp...He tells me stories about destroyer tactics and dropping cans on subs from airplanes...he served most of his time in the Atlantic during the time the Germans were running amok.
I served in the Navy during the first Persian Gulf war...I served on the aircraft carrier USS Independence, which was based out of Japan and was the flag ship in West PAC.
Good luck Scourtney2 at the Naval Academy, ya Wog.
Just remember one thing, be good to your Marine comrads, most of them have big egos and hearts to match. I never met a marine I didn't like, and don't let them forget that the marines are members of the department of the Navy. That drives them bonkers.

dprucha
05-11-2005, 08:32 PM
Greetings:

My father was a radar operator stationed stateside in San Diego and later at Banana River NAS (Florida).

Dalfor
05-11-2005, 09:00 PM
My Grandfather was in the navy during WWII,he was in that practice operation that was attacked before D day.

InfectiousDust
05-11-2005, 10:00 PM
Originally posted by Dalfor:
My Grandfather was in the navy during WWII,he was in that practice operation that was attacked before D day.

Dieppe?

IMBigredhog
05-11-2005, 10:03 PM
I lost two Uncles at Pearl Harbor and had another Uncle in the Pacific as well, he survived three ships that he was aboard being sunk and damaged. He was especially lucky since he was an engineer down in the rngine rooms plus he survived the battle of Leyte gulf. Now my dad was in the rear with the gear guarding and transporting German POW's.

Topp1967
05-12-2005, 12:55 AM
My Grandfather was in the RN from 1937 till he was demobilised in 1947. He served on HMS Glorious, HMS Ark Royal, HMS Aldeberry (minesweeper), HMS Duke of York, HMS Rodney/Nelson (not sure which) and the KGV.

At one point he and his two brothers were all serving on different ships in the Med.

He was on a minesweeper and saw the Scharnhorst, Gneisnau and Prinz Eugen in the distance as they steamed up the channel - there was apparently a debate as to whos ships they were.

He next encountered Scharnhorst at the battle of North Cape on the Duke Of York when Scharnhorst was sunk.

He was aboard Nelson or Rodney at D Day and was on the KGV in 1945 when it was despatched along with other major fleet units to help with the forthcoming invasion of Japan - luckily the Yanks nuked them and he didnt have to run the gauntlet of Kamikazes etc so there trip through the Med, around India and on to Japan became a sightseeing trip.

The only casualty my family suffered was his brother who was lost when HMS Puckeridge (destroyer) was mined near Gib.

Athenian
05-12-2005, 01:41 AM
A grandpa who was a young lieutenant in a Greek navy submarine back then. His name is Emmanouel Mpountouris.

W.Irving
05-12-2005, 02:02 AM
Originally posted by InfectiousDust:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Dalfor:
My Grandfather was in the navy during WWII,he was in that practice operation that was attacked before D day.

Dieppe? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Excercise Tiger probably. Bloody disaster. Hundreds of American soldiers killed when the Americans screwed up and a German E-boat was allowed to attack LST's.

alanschu
05-12-2005, 02:09 AM
Not to say Dieppe wasn't a disaster either http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

x602058
05-12-2005, 09:55 AM
I got to talk to Hans Goebler, who served on U-505 when it was captured. He moved to the U.S. in the late 80's and lived in Elkheart Indianna. He used to go to Chicago where 505 is on display and be a guest speaker, talking about what life was like on board ect. He currently lives in Hernando Florida. The suprising thing is, he still supports the Nazi ideal. He always ended his conversations with "88" , which is neo-nazi movement slang. H is the 8th letter in the alphabet, so 88=HH or Heil Hitler.

Andpal_9451
05-12-2005, 10:28 AM
My grandfather served the Regia Marina Italiana and he was on PT Cruiser "Roma" , sinked in sept.9 1943 by Luftwaffe. They were headed to Brindisi to deliver the "Roma" to the allied forces after the armistice of Sept 8 1943.
He fortunally survived but with a severe injuries to his arm.
A dark page of the Marina Militare Italiana

InfectiousDust
05-12-2005, 10:51 AM
Originally posted by W.Irving:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by InfectiousDust:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Dalfor:
My Grandfather was in the navy during WWII,he was in that practice operation that was attacked before D day.

Dieppe? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Excercise Tiger probably. Bloody disaster. Hundreds of American soldiers killed when the Americans screwed up and a German E-boat was allowed to attack LST's. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'm not trying to compare or anything, but out of the 4,963 Canadians who raided Dieppe, only 2,210 returned. Valuable lessons may have been learned for the coming D-Day invasion, but at what cost?

SteveAndHisGuns
05-12-2005, 11:29 AM
My Uncle Doug who died last year was on subs in the Med with the Royal Navy during WW2. Never really talked much about it, although I know he had some medals and awards. Lovely bloke, real gentleman and sadly missed.

W.Irving
05-12-2005, 11:46 AM
As they say about the Italian tanks..

World's best tanks! Two forward gears - five reverse.

the_Wakeful
05-12-2005, 12:34 PM
My grandfather was an aircraft mechanic on the carrier USS Enterprise in the pacific. Served through the whole war. Saw the Yorktown get sunk at midway and all that stuff. He's dead now.

Fritz1GD
05-12-2005, 02:01 PM
I have a hell of a story for you all.... Both of my Grandfathers served in WWII. One who served as a secret topographer/photo engraver (MAP MAKER) living secretly in England making maps for the invasion of D-Day. After the invasion he was transfered to the 95th Infantry Div. "Iron Men of Metz." I'm very proud of him, and he has a lot of marvelous stories, as well as the not so good ones...
My other grandfather, served in the pacific. He was the helmsman of the U.S.S. Pennsecola. A U.S. cruiser. He doesn't share any stories at all... Unfortunatley. His ship got the sh*t kicked out of it a lot. And the Japansese claimed to have sunk her 12 times. But they didn't. They named her the "Grey Ghost." Anyways, they were given the assingment of taking a special "package" to the Tinian Islands... While they were in dry dock preparing for the task, they were hit by a kamikaze plane, and recieved to heavy of damage to carry out their orders. So instead of the Pennsecola being sent, they sent the other cruiser, the U.S.S. Indianapolis. RING A BELL? While the Indianapolis was taking this package to the islands, she was torpedoed by a Jap sub, and sunk within minutes. The survivors of the Indianapolis were in the waters for a week trying to survive in shark infested waters. More than half of the men that survived the wreck were killed by sharks before they were rescued. It could have been my grandfather in those waters... A local man in my city wrote a book about the Indianapolis named Doug Stanton. It's called "In Harms Way" and it mentions the Pennsecola originally assigned to the mission. Oh by the way, that package was the first atom bomb....

Cheers,
Mike "Fritz"

jdlnorcal
05-12-2005, 03:16 PM
you got your facts a little out of wack as to the Indianiapolis, she was sunk AFTER having delivered the bomb to Tiniain.
as for relitives, My father served with the 1st Marine Div. at Guadalcanal.
and I served as a Navy Corpsman, with the 1st Marine Div. in Da Nang.

Fritz1GD
05-12-2005, 04:03 PM
My bad, got a little carried away. AFTER she delivered the package to the Tinian Islands........................................... ...............

Captain_Avatar
05-12-2005, 04:19 PM
Originally posted by x602058:
I. He always ended his conversations with "88" , which is neo-nazi movement slang. H is the 8th letter in the alphabet, so 88=HH or Heil Hitler.

Oh My! For all the ham radio operators out there the term "88" also means "Hugs and Kisses". It's what a male ham would tell a female ham he was friendly with at then end of a conversation.

Captain_Avatar
05-12-2005, 04:24 PM
My uncle Kenneth Warden was on the USS Curtis, AV-4, a seaplane tender at Pearl Harbor. The previous week they were at Wake Island delivering the last batch of aviation gas for the F-4s and Catalinas stationed there. He made through the attack at Pearl OK, but he had the unenviable task of retrieving the dead and wounded from the water afterwards. Many times the skin would pull right off their arms due to the burns and they would have to reach for them again. Hell of an experience for a 17 year old boy from Oklahoma.

Rab09
05-12-2005, 04:31 PM
Howdy all,
My Father served in the Pacific; first on Tin Cans (with carriers when Pearl was bombed). Transfered to subs when Tin Can reached Pearl. Finished the war as a Chief Torp. Worked on the torps from U-505 at Key West Florida. Then became a Chief Guided Missleman (in the first graduating class of same).
Worked on the Regulas missle program at Point Mugu,California. Retired after 21 yrs.

TheRealWulfmann
05-12-2005, 06:35 PM
x60205
I got to talk to Hans Goebler, who served on U-505 when it was captured. He moved to the U.S. in the late 80's and lived in Elkheart Indianna. He used to go to Chicago where 505 is on display and be a guest speaker, talking about what life was like on board ect. He currently lives in Hernando Florida. The suprising thing is, he still supports the Nazi ideal. He always ended his conversations with "88" , which is neo-nazi movement slang. H is the 8th letter in the alphabet, so 88=HH or Heil Hitler.
I knew the now deceased Hans Goebler. I still see his wife occasionaly and he has a teenage daughter that looks just like him. They soold their "Historic Mugs" at gun shows
I talked with him many times on this and he often said it was not just Hitler that was bad but many other Nazis and never indicated anything favorable regarding them. When I first met him (I speak poor German but my correct names caught his attention) I allowed him to express his views without mentioning mine so I have no idea what you are talking about. Everyone liked him and I can assure you had he been Nazi sympathetic that would not have been the case.
Wulfmann

TheRealWulfmann
05-12-2005, 06:49 PM
Originally posted by scourtney2:
The next person in my family to be in the Navy will be myself when I report to the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis on June 29th.

Congrats and do us proud.

My father was a lifer in the US Navy.
He was on the USS Sacramento (gunboat) second ship in from the point across from battleship row at Pearl, Dec 7, 1941. He was at Darwin when the JapXXXsE struck there. He served on a floating dry dock in New Caledonia and lived much like McCale. I told us war stories and we barely listened and he died in 1971. I wish I could sit him down now and get a blow by blow of that one day in particular.
My mother's brother, my uncle George was the only Greek on the USS Missouri. he was on her before she was commisioned and met my aunt Georgia on the tour of the surrender plague.
So my family witnessed the first minutes and the last minutes of US involvement in WWII in person.
It was the vast amount of common nobodies that served to allow us to enjoy the freedoms we now have.
And now scourtney2 will carry on that tradition of service.
Freedom is not free.
Wulfmann

x602058
05-13-2005, 09:47 AM
Originally posted by TheRealWulfmann:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">x60205
I got to talk to Hans Goebler, who served on U-505 when it was captured. He moved to the U.S. in the late 80's and lived in Elkheart Indianna. He used to go to Chicago where 505 is on display and be a guest speaker, talking about what life was like on board ect. He currently lives in Hernando Florida. The suprising thing is, he still supports the Nazi ideal. He always ended his conversations with "88" , which is neo-nazi movement slang. H is the 8th letter in the alphabet, so 88=HH or Heil Hitler.
I knew the now deceased Hans Goebler. I still see his wife occasionaly and he has a teenage daughter that looks just like him. They soold their "Historic Mugs" at gun shows
I talked with him many times on this and he often said it was not just Hitler that was bad but many other Nazis and never indicated anything favorable regarding them. When I first met him (I speak poor German but my correct names caught his attention) I allowed him to express his views without mentioning mine so I have no idea what you are talking about. Everyone liked him and I can assure you had he been Nazi sympathetic that would not have been the case.
Wulfmann </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Maybe you didn't know him as well as you think.
I didn't hear that he passed. I know what I'm saying is true because I was born and raised National Socialist. I got out of the movement 10 years ago. I know for a FACT that he had a friend who lived in Tampa who owned a resturant. This friend served in the war with Germany as well. Every April 20th Hans and Erika would go to a party to celibrate Hitlers birthday. If you wern't in the movement I'm sure he would of never told you.

jagtigermk2
05-13-2005, 11:27 AM
My Grandad on my dads side of the family served with the Royal Navy during WW2.

At the start of the war he served on a mine sweeper, he had a disagreement with an officer and he ended up hitting him.

For his punishment he had to serve on a royal navy submarine, my dad said he hated it. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

TheRealWulfmann
05-13-2005, 11:39 AM
X602058

You could be right and perhaps he found my dislike for Hitler and what he stood for to be easier agreed with.
He certainly did not let on about liking Der Fueher but he did have some Adolph mugs and all he sold.
His wife was much younger than him and speaks with a heavy accent but she does not think she has an accent. Their daughter does a funny rendition of which her mother insist she does not sound like that. The daughter is spot on!! LOL

Wulfmann

militarybooks
05-13-2005, 11:45 AM
x60205
I got to talk to Hans Goebler, who served on U-505 when it was captured. He moved to the U.S. in the late 80's and lived in Elkheart Indianna. He used to go to Chicago where 505 is on display and be a guest speaker, talking about what life was like on board ect. He currently lives in Hernando Florida. The suprising thing is, he still supports the Nazi ideal. He always ended his conversations with "88" , which is neo-nazi movement slang. H is the 8th letter in the alphabet, so 88=HH or Heil Hitler.

I knew the now deceased Hans Goebler. I still see his wife occasionaly and he has a teenage daughter that looks just like him. They soold their "Historic Mugs" at gun shows
I talked with him many times on this and he often said it was not just Hitler that was bad but many other Nazis and never indicated anything favorable regarding them. When I first met him (I speak poor German but my correct names caught his attention) I allowed him to express his views without mentioning mine so I have no idea what you are talking about. Everyone liked him and I can assure you had he been Nazi sympathetic that would not have been the case.
Wulfmann


Maybe you didn't know him as well as you think.
I didn't hear that he passed. I know what I'm saying is true because I was born and raised National Socialist. I got out of the movement 10 years ago. I know for a FACT that he had a friend who lived in Tampa who owned a resturant. This friend served in the war with Germany as well. Every April 20th Hans and Erika would go to a party to celibrate Hitlers birthday. If you wern't in the movement I'm sure he would of never told you.

I am Hans Goebeler's publisher of the revised, hardcover edition of "Steel Boat, Iron Hearts: A U-boat Crewman's Life aboard U-505." it is too date the only full length memoir by a U-boat enlisted man. Hans made every patrol aboard U-505. He died in 1999 of cancer.

I knew him and know his widow, Erika. He never revealed any pro-Nazi feelings to me or to any of the many other people I know who knew him better than I did. Keith Gill, U-505's curator, knew Hans well, and wrote the new Introduction for his book. I can assure you Mr. Gill would never have done so had he even had an inkling that Hans was somehow pro-Hitler.

No one knows what's in a man's heart, but I find the story doubtful, at best.

If you want a great read from an enlisted man's point of view, I highly recommend the book. They are signed by co-author John Vanzo.

Mylo42
05-14-2005, 02:50 AM
My grandfather served in the Kreigsmarine, although I didn't find this out until recently, many years after he died. My mom "spilled the beans" to me one time when I started asking about him. He died when I was 8. I always knew him as a very kind, quiet German man who had difficulty with english and read his German Bible every night with a shot of Schnapps (I didn't know it was Schnapps when I was 8. I figured that one out later). My mom told me the reason he never (ever) mentioned it was because he was ashamed of having served for such a regime. I guess he was basically drafted, I don't know, I just get the impression it wasn't his idea. Nobody in my family knows any details. Mom said she found photos of him "on a boat" when she was a young girl, which is how she found out. She was sworn to secrecy, my grandfather having then burned the photos, I guess, my mom's not quite sure on that. Anyway, he came to Canada shortly after the war and worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway where he swung a 10 pound sledge hammer driving spikes for 35 years. He left his most prize possession to my mom when he died, his harmonica, which he said he had since he was a little boy in "the old Country." I have no doubt it is the same harmonica he likly played on board some ship during lonely times at sea during the war. His playing of that harmonica is one of the few things I do remember as a kid. I was amazed, still am.

I am very proud of the grandfather that I never knew, for enduring the life that he did, raising a family as a HARD labourer, and being a gentle soul. What I wouldn't give to be able to sit down with him and have him tell me about his life. I hope he never lived entirely with guilt and shame.

His name was Paul GIESTER.

I appreciate the opportunity to share this, as much as it saddens me.

SubSerpent
05-14-2005, 03:41 AM
I was a seaman in combat uniform in Baghdad, when you were just a seamen in liquid form in your dad's bag!!! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Mylo42
05-14-2005, 03:53 AM
You know, I really enjoyed reading the posts on this thread, family members respecting those that served in the armed forces, recognizing that they deserve to be honoured and thought of with dignity for their sacrifices to their countries.

.......then, along comes a reminder as to one of the things that is desperately wrong in society today, a simple lack of basic respect from a child.

I would like to apologize on behalf of SubSerpent to all of those mentioned in this thread, and to our serving members of the armed forces, for his lack of common decency. He likely does not understand nor has given a seconds thought to the freedom he enjoys.

SubSerpent
05-14-2005, 04:10 AM
Mylo, I find it funny that your grandfather was a Nazi non-supporter but yet still seemed to serve with them. I think he just regreted being on the loosing side of the war. I think he was probably still a Nazi at heart until his dying day. He could have left the war and desserted if the cause of the Nazi regime was too much to bear, but NO! He stuck on with them until after the war and fled off to a country that was on the winning side. I find it funny that so many Nazi supports took this same course of action after the war. IMHO, you grandfather just like any other Nazi supporter was a coward if they stuck with them till the end only to run and hide in one of the allied nations after the war. Your grandfather did nothing for the freedoms that I enjoy today, he only helped to make them harder for my grandfather to achieve them for you and me! He should have died for what he believed in, not for what he was forced to believe in!

Hoatee
05-14-2005, 07:07 AM
My father served as an officer aboard the 'Willem van de Zaan' (Dutch minesweeper/layer) during the 2nd World War.

1.JaVA_Hornet
05-14-2005, 04:48 PM
My grandfather had served as an officer on
almost every dutch battleship before and in the war.

I will post photo`s.

Docjonel
05-14-2005, 05:49 PM
As a physician in New London, Connecticut, I encounter many WWII submarine veterans, and get to ask them about their service histories. I've met vets who were depth charged for real by Japanese destroyers- one even said he heard the clicks of the triggers before the actual explosions a few times. One elderly gentleman was missing a thumb. When I asked him how he got that injury, he said, "I was manning a deck gun in the Pacific when a Jap merchant fired back at us. But we got 'em!" I had one patient, recently deceased, who had shrapnel still in his back from a kamikaze that struck his ship, the USS Nashville, and killed 133 shipmates. After 9/11 his wife told me that seeing the planes hit the WTC revived his nightmares. I had to give him medication to help him sleep again. Another fellow claimed to have spotted a U-boat in the Pacific which his sub sank. He believed it had a supply of mercury on board. Another patient of mine, who is in great shape and doesn't look a day over sixty, was a damage control officer on the Lexington from her commissioning until the end of the war. Hard to believe what these guys endured. Amazing fellows. So few of them left.

Mylo42
05-15-2005, 12:52 AM
SubSerpent,

I can appreciate your opinions and can see why some would feel that way. It is very easy to judge others, from the comforts of our cosy homes, in front of our computers.

I believe there is a difference between being a member of the National Socialist party and serving in the German military in some capacity, with regards to your NAZI comment.

Times in Europe in those days, particularly Poland (My grandfather was a Polish German....they were considered lower class by the self proclaimed "real" Germans), were tough. I do not know what circumstances led to him serving in the Kriegsmarine. I suspect it was out of some sort of neccesity, whether it be a roof over his head, food in his stomach, or simply sellecting it over some other evil. To say "well, he should have committed suicide instead of joining "their" side." or expecting that there were in fact any other options available.

Yes, he did leave Germany and came to Canada when he got enough money together to make the trip. Again, life over there wasn't the best. He chose to work for the Canadian Pacific Railway because he wanted to help build the nation, a nation that he came to love. His dedication to hard work for, what he felt, was a noble cause, is more than you, or I, can comprehend in this day and age of comfort.

If your family suffered a loss in WWII at the hands of the German military machine, I feel badly for that. I believe many sacrifices were made. I do feel that decent people served in the German military, people that may or may not have had much in the way of options presented to them at the time. Ask an actual WWII vet what he thinks. I know old gentlemen that served on both the Axis and Allies that have become friends. Surely, if the men subjected to the horror of warfare can see past the atrocities that put them in such positions, we can as well.

Thanks for taking time to respond. I do enjoy opions of others, regardless of whether I agree or not.

hentai_ninja
05-15-2005, 01:56 AM
My grandpa died in a nazi concentration camp. He was manning a machine gun and accidently fell out of his guard tower.

JohnPVanzo
05-15-2005, 01:01 PM
I was a very close friend of Hans Goebeler for 15 years, and I can tell you he was not a nazi!!! He had great pride in his country and his naval service, and in many minds that equals "NAZI", but it doesn't. If you were indeed a hard-core nazi when he met you, maybe he was just trying to be kind to you (or more likely complete a sale!!!) by telling you what he thought you wanted to hear.
I co-wrote Hans' WWII Magazine article and his autobiography "Steel Boat, Iron Hearts" and I spent HUNDREDS of hours speaking with him, including many times with beer and wine that "loosened our lips" you might say. In my opinion, Hans was historically correct but politically incorrect. By that I mean, he admitted that pre-war Hitler accomplished many good things for Germany, especially putting people back to work and saving the country from communism. As a wartime leader, Hans thought Hitler was a disaster. Maybe Hans' willingness to "give the devil his due" confused some people into believing he himself was a nazi. I knew Hans from the time Michelle was in diapers to the day he died, and I think the best words that describe Hans Goebeler was "anti-communist patriot" and "Christian". Please don't destroy this fine man's reputation with your so-called "facts" when he is no longer around to defend himself.

JohnPVanzo
05-15-2005, 01:10 PM
Originally posted by x602058:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by TheRealWulfmann:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">x60205
I got to talk to Hans Goebler, who served on U-505 when it was captured. He moved to the U.S. in the late 80's and lived in Elkheart Indianna. He used to go to Chicago where 505 is on display and be a guest speaker, talking about what life was like on board ect. He currently lives in Hernando Florida. The suprising thing is, he still supports the Nazi ideal. He always ended his conversations with "88" , which is neo-nazi movement slang. H is the 8th letter in the alphabet, so 88=HH or Heil Hitler.
I knew the now deceased Hans Goebler. I still see his wife occasionaly and he has a teenage daughter that looks just like him. They soold their "Historic Mugs" at gun shows
I talked with him many times on this and he often said it was not just Hitler that was bad but many other Nazis and never indicated anything favorable regarding them. When I first met him (I speak poor German but my correct names caught his attention) I allowed him to express his views without mentioning mine so I have no idea what you are talking about. Everyone liked him and I can assure you had he been Nazi sympathetic that would not have been the case.
Wulfmann </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Maybe you didn't know him as well as you think.
I didn't hear that he passed. I know what I'm saying is true because I was born and raised National Socialist. I got out of the movement 10 years ago. I know for a FACT that he had a friend who lived in Tampa who owned a resturant. This friend served in the war with Germany as well. Every April 20th Hans and Erika would go to a party to celibrate Hitlers birthday. If you wern't in the movement I'm sure he would of never told you. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Maybe you didn't know him as well as you think.
Maybe you didn't know him as well as you think.
I didn't hear that he passed. I know what I'm saying is true because I was born and raised National Socialist. I got out of the movement 10 years ago. I know for a FACT that he had a friend who lived in Tampa who owned a resturant. This friend served in the war with Germany as well. Every April 20th Hans and Erika would go to a party to celibrate Hitlers birthday. If you wern't in the movement I'm sure he would of never told you.[/QUOTE]
posted Sun May 15 2005 12:01
I was a very close friend of Hans Goebeler for 15 years, and I can tell you he was not a nazi!!! He had great pride in his country and his naval service, and in many minds that equals "NAZI", but it doesn't. If you were indeed a hard-core nazi when he met you, maybe he was just trying to be kind to you (or more likely complete a sale!!!) by telling you what he thought you wanted to hear.
I co-wrote Hans' WWII Magazine article and his autobiography "Steel Boat, Iron Hearts" and I spent HUNDREDS of hours speaking with him, including many times with beer and wine that "loosened our lips" you might say. In my opinion, Hans was historically correct but politically incorrect. By that I mean, he admitted that pre-war Hitler accomplished many good things for Germany, especially putting people back to work and saving the country from communism. As a wartime leader, Hans thought Hitler was a disaster. Maybe Hans' willingness to "give the devil his due" confused some people into believing he himself was a nazi. I knew Hans from the time Michelle was in diapers to the day he died, and I think the best words that describe Hans Goebeler was "anti-communist patriot" and "Christian". Please don't destroy this fine man's reputation with your so-called "facts" when he is no longer around to defend himself.

The Avon Lady
05-15-2005, 02:37 PM
Pardon me for asking but...............

What would the US Immigration and Naturalization Service have done with Goebeler while he was living had it been found out that he actually was a Nazi party member or supporter and that he witheld the truth from the US government?

x602058
05-16-2005, 10:28 AM
Originally posted by JohnPVanzo:
I was a very close friend of Hans Goebeler for 15 years, and I can tell you he was not a nazi!!! He had great pride in his country and his naval service, and in many minds that equals "NAZI", but it doesn't. If you were indeed a hard-core nazi when he met you, maybe he was just trying to be kind to you (or more likely complete a sale!!!) by telling you what he thought you wanted to hear.
I co-wrote Hans' WWII Magazine article and his autobiography "Steel Boat, Iron Hearts" and I spent HUNDREDS of hours speaking with him, including many times with beer and wine that "loosened our lips" you might say. In my opinion, Hans was historically correct but politically incorrect. By that I mean, he admitted that pre-war Hitler accomplished many good things for Germany, especially putting people back to work and saving the country from communism. As a wartime leader, Hans thought Hitler was a disaster. Maybe Hans' willingness to "give the devil his due" confused some people into believing he himself was a nazi. I knew Hans from the time Michelle was in diapers to the day he died, and I think the best words that describe Hans Goebeler was "anti-communist patriot" and "Christian". Please don't destroy this fine man's reputation with your so-called "facts" when he is no longer around to defend himself.

I was not trying to destroy him. I have great respect for anyone who fought for their country. I am only telling you what he told me, and it wasn't to make a sale, I never bought anything from him. Maybe it was because he knew of my family and our political beliefs, and he didn't want to start any trouble. If you knew him as well as you say, I can take your word for it. I belived it because after a good talk on the phone, nothing about politics, just his U-boat expreience. He told me about what happend on board when 505 was captured. After our phone conversation, I said good-bye, he said Heil Hitler. What should I think?

TheRealWulfmann
05-16-2005, 12:12 PM
Mylo42,
Don't bother with people who are blatantly ignorant of historic truths to satisfy stereo type hatred. He has embarrassed himself to all that have read this. Your grandfather sounds like most young men that were sent to fight the war of a few politicians and I am sure we all would have enjoyed hearing him relive his days in the service of his country and not for any other reason.
The German Navy was down right anti-Nazi, for those that have studied this. They were told to dismiss their Jewish officers and refused. They made a deal with the Nazis to recognize them as the legitimate government of Germany and in exchange the Nazi had to agree to a hands off policy for all the Jewish mariners and all family members of naval personal. The navy refused to adopt the Nazi salute as they considered it a political one and they were not a political organization. If you watch old films of Prein and his men being greeted by Hitler you will see them give the cap salute. Lutjens on Bismarck refused to salute Hitler to his face with anything butt the standard military salute (Lutjen's grandmother was Jewish). You could be a Nazi and be in the Kriegsmarine but most were not.
Consequently, Hitler never funded the German navy any more than he had to, Ironic considering the U-Boat arm was the thing that almost won the war against Britain.
I also know many joined the Nazi party during the war as your rations were increased for being a member. It was simple feed your family economics. Like many French €œcollaborators€, unemployed with hungry children and work being offered. Starve your kids to satisfy arrogant full stomached axxholes or ride it out as best you can. Most were just trying to survive and most of us would have done the same except those that claim lofty heroism. They are usually the first to panic and run when reality sets in and condescendingly judge from a safe distance only.
The fact is the rape of Germany at Versailles was the main cause of the rise of Hitler and the reason America wanted no part in €œEurope€s war€ as Wilson warned their betrayal would cause what actually happened. This does not dismiss German responsibility for what happened but had Britain and France acted responsibly there would likely never had been a Hitler or WWII.
There is enough blame to go around for everyone. This is not a story of different planetary races from outer space. We are all human and related and we did this to ourselves and everyone one of us is capable of anything other humans can do. Ignoring that will lead one to it again.
When someone shares something about a loved one; some respect should be shown. If you have some evidence to the contrary; do it in a way that makes you legally responsible to prove it or be ready to compensate for slanderous remarks that are certainly not earning you anything but contempt!

Wulfmann

TheRealWulfmann
05-16-2005, 12:33 PM
Originally posted by The Avon Lady:
Pardon me for asking but...............
What would the US Immigration and Naturalization Service have done with Goebeler while he was living had it been found out that he actually was a Nazi party member or supporter and that he witheld the truth from the US government?

Anyone that was important to the US or any country irregardless of their allegiance during the war was fine and were told to put down the truth and it would be overlooked.
The Russian and US space programs should give a hint.
You could say you slaughtered innocent civilians and if you had value to the post war anti-communist scare, you were just fine. If you did not disclose what you did and had no value to the country then you would be made an example of to whitewash the €œhidden€ criminals we (and other countries) had use for.

As far as the notion Hitler did some good. I agree with that. For one he was the single most responsible for the civil rights movement in the USA. When we criticized Germany for €œsegregating€ the Jews, they remarked they treated their unwanted Jews better than we treated are €œunwanted€ blacks. (this was in the 30s before the death camps) They had a point! That was the true beginning to come face to face with the realities of our hypocritical attitude.
Second; Hitler was the most responsible for the creation of the state of Israel. Without the unbridled hatred of the Nazis the Jews would likely not have got their homeland so righteously deserved.

Make sure these 2 points are the first you use for those Hitler loving ******ed morons as it irks them to consider two things they hate so much were brought about by their demon hero and it is enjoyable to watch their small minds swirl in confusion.

Wulfmann

x602058
05-16-2005, 12:43 PM
Originally posted by TheRealWulfmann:
Mylo42,
Don't bother with people who are blatantly ignorant of historic truths to satisfy stereo type hatred. He has embarrassed himself to all that have read this. Your grandfather sounds like most young men that were sent to fight the war of a few politicians and I am sure we all would have enjoyed hearing him relive his days in the service of his country and not for any other reason.
The German Navy was down right anti-Nazi, for those that have studied this. They were told to dismiss their Jewish officers and refused. They made a deal with the Nazis to recognize them as the legitimate government of Germany and in exchange the Nazi had to agree to a hands off policy for all the Jewish mariners and all family members of naval personal. The navy refused to adopt the Nazi salute as they considered it a political one and they were not a political organization. If you watch old films of Prein and his men being greeted by Hitler you will see them give the cap salute. Lutjens on Bismarck refused to salute Hitler to his face with anything butt the standard military salute (Lutjen's grandmother was Jewish). You could be a Nazi and be in the Kriegsmarine but most were not.
Consequently, Hitler never funded the German navy any more than he had to, Ironic considering the U-Boat arm was the thing that almost won the war against Britain.
I also know many joined the Nazi party during the war as your rations were increased for being a member. It was simple feed your family economics. Like many French €œcollaborators€, unemployed with hungry children and work being offered. Starve your kids to satisfy arrogant full stomached axxholes or ride it out as best you can. Most were just trying to survive and most of us would have done the same except those that claim lofty heroism. They are usually the first to panic and run when reality sets in and condescendingly judge from a safe distance only.
The fact is the rape of Germany at Versailles was the main cause of the rise of Hitler and the reason America wanted no part in €œEurope€s war€ as Wilson warned their betrayal would cause what actually happened. This does not dismiss German responsibility for what happened but had Britain and France acted responsibly there would likely never had been a Hitler or WWII.
There is enough blame to go around for everyone. This is not a story of different planetary races from outer space. We are all human and related and we did this to ourselves and everyone one of us is capable of anything other humans can do. Ignoring that will lead one to it again.
When someone shares something about a loved one; some respect should be shown. If you have some evidence to the contrary; do it in a way that makes you legally responsible to prove it or be ready to compensate for slanderous remarks that are certainly not earning you anything but contempt!

Wulfmann

Slanderous remarks? Tell the FBI to pull my phone records then. I was just telling what to me was incredible that after many years have past that someone would still hold true to their beliefs, be it right or wrong. Maybe you're just protecting yourself and the truth. And to say that the Kreigsmarine had no National Socialist sailors is a complete fabrication. Why does his website still site sell Nazi Paraphernalia? SS Pins, Iron Cross, Swastika T-shirts etc. Anyone can go to http://www.hansgoebeler.com and decide for themselves.

TheRealWulfmann
05-16-2005, 12:55 PM
Sorry x602058,
That was not directed at you but to Subserpent's disrespecting Mylo's grandfather.
I respectively disagree with your opinion but do not feel you were trying to slander Hans but expressing your point which, so far has been shown to have no other support.
Even though I disagree with you, your manner of discussing it was not in the derogatory manner Subserpent attempted to belittle a deceased man that seemed to show by his life he was a good person and honorable.
I got tunnel vision and forgot there were two controversial discussions here.

Wulfmann

x602058
05-16-2005, 01:11 PM
Originally posted by TheRealWulfmann:
Sorry x602058,
That was not directed at you but to Subserpent's disrespecting Mylo's grandfather.
I respectively disagree with your opinion but do not feel you were trying to slander Hans but expressing your point which, so far has been shown to have no other support.
Even though I disagree with you, your manner of discussing it was not in the derogatory manner Subserpent attempted to belittle a deceased man that seemed to show by his life he was a good person and honorable.
I got tunnel vision and forgot there were two controversial discussions here.

Wulfmann

Anyways, I fully believe that in a lot of respects, Germany had every right to go to War, if you know the history. Germany, in my mind had the best military the world has ever seen. They happened to lose because the allies out produced them in materials. Most of the allied armies wouldn't go head to head with the Warmacht unless the odds were 10 to 1 in the allies favor. Plus, they had the coolest uniforms.. haha

aka_cyclops
05-16-2005, 01:36 PM
My grandfather was a radioman on an LST. His ship transported troops and prisoners most of the time. He was in the second wave at D-Day.

The only member of the ships crew to be killed was by friendly fire at D-Day on the way to the beach.

Once the ship was on the beach, the Canadian and British troops the ship was carrying were getting hammered by the German machine gun emplacements. The ships captain disobeyed orders and had the deck guns open fire on the machine guns. The 20 and 30 mm cannons blew a hole through the german lines that the ground pounders quickly took advantage of. The Captain was later reprimanded for disobeying orders, but he was a merchant marine captain who had signed on for the war and he really didn't care.

W.Irving
05-16-2005, 01:59 PM
The Kriegsmarine, Luftwaffe, and Abwehr were all very anti nazi organisations. As I see it, there were essentially two types of people fighting for Germany during WWII; the old school gentleman soldiers, and the indoctrinated (all NSDAP's doing really. They exploited the desperation in Germany during the depression in an awful way) nazi supporters.

Whoever they were, they were soldiers facing execution or interment if they disobeyed orders. Don't blame people for really only wanting to survive - it's basic human instinct (the little we have left).

Sadly, there is too little talk of what the Soviets did. I would dare to say that they were (almost) just as bad.

x602058
05-16-2005, 02:21 PM
Originally posted by W.Irving:
The Kriegsmarine, Luftwaffe, and Abwehr were all very anti nazi organisations. As I see it, there were essentially two types of people fighting for Germany during WWII; the old school gentleman soldiers, and the indoctrinated (all NSDAP's doing really. They exploited the desperation in Germany during the depression in an awful way) nazi supporters.

Whoever they were, they were soldiers facing execution or interment if they disobeyed orders. Don't blame people for really only wanting to survive - it's basic human instinct (the little we have left).

Sadly, there is too little talk of what the Soviets did. I would dare to say that they were (almost) just as bad.

Russians were worse, and murdered far more civilians than Nazi Germany in WWII. I think if people listened to Hitlers speaches, they might discover that it would of been very easy to fall for all the glory and honor talk. I don't blame anyone for being a Nazi. I fell for it myself years ago.

AVGWarhawk
05-16-2005, 02:44 PM
My two uncles served in WWII as well as my Aunt. She was a WAVE in Pacific theater. She as since passed of old age. She met my uncle during the war and married after it was over. He served on a carrier and has not flown in a airplane since the war. Said the pilots were nuts. Anyway, he does not talk about it much.I know he worked on the fighter aircraft and torpedos for submarines. The war really affected him, as well as, the loss of his brother in the European theater. My other uncle fought in the European theater...(brother to my uncle previously written about), he was a B17 pilot with the 94th squadron. His first and last mission was over Kiel Germany and the target was the sub pens. Note, I said the first and last mission. Kiel was heavily defended with AA and aircraft. All crew died except Capt Rawlinson that was blown clear of the aircraft. My uncle was tail gunner. The B17, Klo Kay, was lead and required all of the crew to be commissioned officers. Death was June 13th 1943. Much to our dismay, we received the German records of this incident as Rawlinson was captured and interrogated. Our Dept of Veterans Affairs made his headstone 50 years ago with incorrect date of death (June 13th 1942). After many letters to the Dept of Vet Affairs and proof that stone was incorrect, they had a new one made and delivered to Flushing Cemetery, NY for free! So we rededicated the stone and made it straight for the record books. I have the old stone in my front yard. Makes for good conversation and a bit of family history. Anyway, I have made a shadow box of what we have concerning the war. I have his wings, a small letter sent from England to my mom with a locket included. Various other things. To this day, the flag that draped his casket over 50 years ago still is flown over Flushing Cemetery, NY every Memorial and Veterans day.

ViolentVolVo
05-16-2005, 05:31 PM
My grandfather served with the french foriegn legion from 1936 to 1952. I doent know mutch about it, he didnt want to talk about it. All i know is that hes unit had to fight for the Germans early in the Africa campaign, but later on the entire unit defectet and fought for the allieds the rest of the war. He got both German,French and british medals a "honnor knife" and some other stuff. The coolest thing he got is hes original "capi" (the wierd hat) and he still got the walther pistol the got from the Germans. Hes still alive living in Paris, but im living in Denmark so i doent se him that mutch

TheRealWulfmann
05-16-2005, 07:39 PM
These are all so neat guys keep the relative info coming!
My uncle was a crewman on a B-17 in the 8th as well. I don't know what raid his plane went down but I only know he was killed during a raid.
Two of my Greek relatives (mother's side) were sent to German work camps and were never heard from again. Most others just rode it out with the men in the resistance. There were two groups and they fought each other for a good part of the war. When they finally settled their differences (postponed them until later!) things got very uncomfortable for the Germans.
I have spoken with Russians that say Stalin killed at least another 20 million people during the war, Russian people! This one official told me they will never know how many because he would eliminate entire cities including the very buildings and then rewrite all the books, what few were allowed, so the place and people never existed.
Talk about absolute power corrupting absolutely.
Wulfmann

TheRealWulfmann
05-16-2005, 07:42 PM
Originally posted by 1.JaVA_Hornet:
My grandfather had served as an officer on
almost every dutch battleship before and in the war.
I will post photo`s.

I assume you mean warships as the Dutch never had a battleship.
2 British J class destroyers were comminsioned with Dutch crews in 1942. SH3 did not do this and placed them in the RN. My mod will have those two DDs flying the flag of the Netherlands, for whatever that is worth.
Wulfmann

c_mattio
05-17-2005, 12:02 PM
Originally posted by SubSerpent:
I find it funny that your grandfather was a Nazi non-supporter but yet still seemed to serve with them.

Maybe he felt a little like Admiral Lütjens who hated Nazism and especially Hitler (his wife was a Jew, but was not persecuted cos she was married to a high ranking naval official) but loved and fought for Germany and was angry about the humiliation of Versailles.
EDIT: I remember from the book Bismarck (Bercuson & Herwig) that it was Lütjens' wife who was a Jew. After reading someone's suggestion it was his grandmother I had a look and couldn't find the reference. I may, therefore, be wrong in thinking it to be his wife, I shall research.


My grandfather on my mother's side was conscripted into the Wehrmacht in 1944ish. He was not Nazi in the slightist, but conscription (as its name suggests) was compulsory. As the story goes, on Christmas Day 1944, after another fruitless search for knettles to make soup, he and his unit found the nearest British unit and surrended! He stayed in Britain after the war (possibly because East Germany where he was from was under Soviet control) and married my Nan. And the rest is history. One of those really scary things that I find a bit weird is that I owe my existance to Hitler. Very unnerving.

My grandfather on my father's side joined the Royal Navy in 1936 (I think). He served on destroyers for most of the war being "...shot at, bombed, torpedoed..." as he put it one day. Not really sure which ships he served on. I will have to find out.

InfectiousDust
05-17-2005, 02:26 PM
Originally posted by x602058:
Russians were worse, and murdered far more civilians than Nazi Germany in WWII.

Actually, Soviet Russia was murdering civilians well before WWII; the war had little to nothing to do with this. The Soviet genocide had killed approximately 10 million peasants in the Ukraine alone by 1935.


Originally posted by SubSerpent:
I find it funny that your grandfather was a Nazi non-supporter but yet still seemed to serve with them.

You obviously don't know what you're talking about. Someone put it quite well earlier in this forum. If you were living in Germany during WWII, you were either a Nazi, you worked for the Nazis, or you were imprisoned in a camp. You weren't given much of a choice.

Zog399
05-18-2005, 02:07 PM
My father started the war as a signalman on a destroyer. He some some action in the Mediterranean. The destroyer was then attached to an anti-sub task force. He then volunteered for sub duty and went to New London for training.

He went on a few sub cruises in an ancient boat that was retrofitted for snorkel testing. Then he had a bad appendicitis attack and spent the balance of the war in the hospital.

After the war he worked for GE on their submarine equipment projects.

cham-4tx
05-18-2005, 07:57 PM
My grandfather was on a carrier during WWII but he died before I was born (I am 28 almost 29) and he died about 32 or so years ago. Wasn't anything special, but he did his job and lived to have 3 kids post WWII.

He served on casablanca class and lexington class carriers and started out as a galley chief (a butcher in real life pre war) and ended as something else but my mother can't remember what. He enlisted the day after pearl harbor, but i don't think he shipped out immediately.

Aside from that I don't know as my grandmother died a few years ago and it's not something that was easy to talk about as it was a painful memory. My mother was born in 43 so she doesn't remember much and can only relay stories.