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Celeon999
06-05-2007, 06:07 AM
Article from www.marine.de (http://www.marine.de)


Translation :


Portsmouth, 01-06-2007


Last week the navys of Germany and the UK gave another testimony for the change from once being fierce enemies to close friends.

At the south-english navy base of Portsmouth, delegates from the Royal Navy Museum aboard the german task force supply ship "Berlin", handed over the ship's bell of the imperial battleship SMS Oldenburg.

With the fade away of the german and british national anthem the hand over was completed.

The handover followed after a festive ceremony with german navy attaché for England Kapitän zur See Uwe Hovorka, the director of the Royal Navy Museum Portsmouth Dr.Colin White and the war veteran Commander (rtd) Edward William Grenfell as speakers.

At the beginning, the commander of the Berlin , Fregattenkapitän Hans-Günther Struck and the commander of the navy base Portsmouth , Captain Iain Greenlees greeted the guests of honour and soldier formations.

Commander Grenfell fought in world-war two against the german navy in the artic. Immidiately after the war , Grenfell was among the first to speak up for a german-british conciliation.

Together with the german captain (rtd) Heinz Palaschweski he initiated the hand over of this historic ship's bell.

The battleship SMS (which means the same as HMS) "Oldenburg" of the german imperial navy survived its participation in the historic seabattle of Skagerrak (The battle of Jutland), the biggest naval engagement in world war one and among the biggest in history, aswell as the rest of world war one but had to be given to imperial Japan as war reparation in 1918.

Japan later gave the ship's bell of the Oldenburg as gift to the Royal Navy Museum Portsmouth.

The speakers agreed that the return of the ship's bell to Germany is a definite sign for the intensity of the friendship between Germany and the UK.

The chosen date for the hand over ceremony underlines the will of both nations to go as friends and never again as enemies into the future. The 31.May was the 91. anniversary of the Skagerrak seabattle.

The bell will be placed in the Naval Museum in Wilhelshaven.

The hand over happened just a few weeks before the christening of a new corvette with the name "Oldenburg" will be commenced.


http://www.marine.de/02DB070000000001/CurrentBaseLink/W273UGCC864INFODE/$FILE/glocken_salut_640.jpg
http://www.marine.de/02DB070000000001/CurrentBaseLink/W273UGKA425INFODE/$FILE/_640.jpg
http://www.marine.de/02DB070000000001/CurrentBaseLink/W273UGJ2219INFODE/$FILE/glocke_640.jpg

The british Grand Fleet

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7e/British_Grand_Fleet_2.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1b/Battle_of_Jutland.jpg/800px-Battle_of_Jutland.jpg


The destruction of HMS "Queen Mary" during the Battle of Jutland

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d2/HMS_Queen_Mary_Jutland.jpg/800px-HMS_Queen_Mary_Jutland.jpg

bunkerratt
06-05-2007, 08:13 AM
interesting .....thanks for the information...but if you ask me ...the older gentelman on the right of the screen still looks pissed about the golf course thing also..... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

Celeon999
06-05-2007, 11:11 AM
Look at his left arm http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

Is that C-4 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif ?


So the SAS send him ? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

*Celeon calls the navy to order a EOD team aboard the Berlin*

Rood-Zwart
06-05-2007, 02:05 PM
Skagerrakschlacht....what a beautiful word http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Celeon999
06-05-2007, 02:34 PM
Luckily the german grammar rules allow us to produce endless long combined words......if we really feel we have to... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

GerritJ9
06-05-2007, 02:53 PM
S.M.S "Oldenburg" was not a liner...... she was classed as a "Linienschiff" and the correct British equivalent for "Linienschiff" is "Battleship", not "liner"! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
S.M.S. "Oldenburg" survived the Great War and was allocated to Japan under the terms of the Versailles Treaty. Japan wasn't interested in her, however, and she was sold to a British company for scrapping in 1920. No doubt that is how her bell ended up in the U.K. Surprisingly she was not scrapped in Britain, but scrapped in Dordrecht in the Netherlands in 1921.
Her most famous sister was S.M.S. "Ostfriesland", made famous by her part in Billy Mitchell's bombing trials. "Helgoland" was allocated to the U.K. and was scrapped in Morecambe in 1924 after being used in several trials. And "Thüringen" was awarded to France, used as a target ship and eventually scrapped in Lorient. Thus ended Germany's second class of Dreadnoughts.

Celeon999
06-05-2007, 03:14 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif A "Linienschiff" is what we call a passenger liner so i assumed that she was a sort of converted "pocket-battleship" http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

GerritJ9
06-05-2007, 03:38 PM
I have here the "Marine-Arsenal" issue about the "Nassau" and "Helgoland" classes in front of me, and it is full of references to "Die Linienschiffe der Nassau-Klasse" and "Die Linienschiffe der Helgoland-Klasse", but perhaps Siegfried Breyer doens't know the difference either! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
Anyway, the cover is titled "Die ersten Grosskampfschiffe der Kaiserlichen Marine (Nassau- und Helgoland-Klasse)".

Celeon999
06-06-2007, 12:55 AM
Originally posted by GerritJ9:
I have here the "Marine-Arsenal" issue about the "Nassau" and "Helgoland" classes in front of me, and it is full of references to "Die Linienschiffe der Nassau-Klasse" and "Die Linienschiffe der Helgoland-Klasse", but perhaps Siegfried Breyer doens't know the difference either! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
Anyway, the cover is titled "Die ersten Grosskampfschiffe der Kaiserlichen Marine (Nassau- und Helgoland-Klasse)".


Ahhhh now i understand !

Wikipedia scores again http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif


Linienschiff, is a very old naval term for a battleship that sails "in line" with others http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

The term originates in the 19th century and describes the heaviest battleship classes in Europe at that time. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif


Today this term is not in use anymore since a loooooong time.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

"Linienschiff" can be used today when you talk about a passenger liner. You know, a ship that travels on a certain line which equals the word route in sense. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

For example the line
Southhampton - New York like the Titanic traveled on. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

My fault, i will edit the text accordingly http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/70/Seeschlacht_bei_Abukir.jpg

GerritJ9
06-06-2007, 05:36 AM
The Royal Navy handed back bells of some other Kaiserliche Marine ships previously, among them the bells of S.M.S. "Friedrich der Grosse" and S.M.S. "Derfflinger" at Faslane in 1965. The book "Jutland to Junkyard", a nice little book about the salvage of the Hochseeflotte at Scapa Flow, contains two photos of the bells being handed over to the Bundesmarine (as well as "Derfflinger"'s seal). Interestingly, the flag of the Kaiserliche Marine was also present at this presentation, as well as those of the Royal Navy and Bundesmarine- perhaps this would be "politically incorrect" nowadays.
Makes me wonder if there are any more bells of Kaiserliche Marine ships in obscure locations in the U.K...........

Stingray-65
06-06-2007, 10:26 AM
Originally posted by Celeon999:
Luckily the german grammar rules allow us to produce endless long combined words......if we really feel we have to... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif And that's exactly the reason I have to constantly consult a German-English dictionary! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blush.gif

Celeon999
06-06-2007, 10:58 AM
According to ******ss, this is the longest german word that was really used at some point :

Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswe rkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft

Which means something like : Donau steamer electrics construction main factory sub-civil servance company http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

Of course you can create endlessly longer words but its hard to create something that makes a sense in the end http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif