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View Full Version : 60 year comparison of our RL counter parts Tell us what you think.



T_O_A_D
05-16-2005, 04:11 PM
We have developed a lost skill that 60 years ago was done away with.

Can you imagine how the Vets felt after doing this for 4 years or more, and then being sent home to never again. I bet they would of loved a chance to have this Sim after the war for fun, Sure some would not want to because of the memeories but alot would, I would think.


Sadly again this skill means nothing in the real world, just as it did back then. We can't take it anywhere and show it off.

So the masses just don't appreciate it or us just like back then.


So what can we do with our selves?

Chuck_Older
05-16-2005, 04:15 PM
Have a beer?

gombal40
05-16-2005, 04:19 PM
i think he mustnt. He head will hurt allready tomorrow http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

GuNzABlaZiN
05-16-2005, 04:21 PM
Well, some of them did go on to become airline pilots, test pilots and air racers. And some IL2 players go on to become actual pilots (or already are). So not all is lost...

TooCooL34
05-16-2005, 04:38 PM
Sometimes I also sigh just like you after some hard training or fierce duel in virtual sky.
For me, it's one of art I keep disciplining to be better.
Most intense, well-informed and immersing form of digital entertainment definitely.
Anyway, hobby has nothing to do with making money or being appreciated, so don't be too concerned about it. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
I can say it for sure that it's ten times worthy over meaningless mob hunt in RPG or ludicrous mouse rolling in FPS. I don't know why so don't refute about it but done that before and sure it is.

LStarosta
05-16-2005, 04:43 PM
A lot of airmen from WWII started up what is now known as a biker gang (no negative connotation intended). Basically they missed the cameraderie and they still had that "need for speed". Motorcycles were like airplanes on land for them, I guess.

As for what we can do...

Get a pilot's license. You have NO IDEA how much IL2 helps you with your airmanship. The high fidelity flight model of IL2 works wonders when you're asked to perform basic maneuvers. It's because you already have these maneuvers (such as skids, coordinated turns, chandelles, cuban 8's etc etc) all hard wired as second nature. Other students need to think twice about how to perform these maneuvers. All you would need is a little practice to refamiliarize yourself with the proper form of the maneuver and for the most part you're good to go. Never underestimate the impact a good sim like IL2 can have on your real life flying mechanics. You develop certain skills and reflexes that can save your life in the future. While there are some differences, the similarities are profound.

My advice. Try to fly IL2 like you only had one aircraft to fly and if you damage or crash it, you're grounded. Start using those instruments and turn off that ****ed speedbar. Speedbar is good for combat, not for when you actually want to practice flying by itself. Get some books on how to perform certain maneuvers and learn how to PROPERLY take off, turn, climb, descend, and land. Most importantly, learn what all the instruments do so you can learn to fly "straight and level" That's one of the most important skills a pilot can have. It's all a bunch of constant corrections and adjustments. Keep your aircraft trimmed and it will fly the way you want it to. The sim lets you get away with a LOT of things you couldn't get away with in real life. So fly conservatively.

GuNzABlaZiN
05-16-2005, 05:17 PM
Originally posted by LStarosta:
A lot of airmen from WWII started up what is now known as a biker gang (no negative connotation intended). Basically they missed the cameraderie and they still had that "need for speed". Motorcycles were like airplanes on land for them, I guess.

Flying in formation down the highway...

T_O_A_D
05-16-2005, 05:28 PM
As a mater of fact I have plans to do this www.natg.com (http://www.natg.com) next month. They are going to be here localy June 3-7. I can't afford the full ride but hopeing to scrounge up enough to get up for 1/2 hour ride and some manuvers.

I have never had my hands on a real aircraft controls and very interested in just how much thsi sim has impacted my ability to slide into the controls of a real aircraft. I've been aiming to take my initial flight with a cessna for a good while but this will be better for, I think. 1940's style, stick, and attitude.


Now on the other subject, of how we cooalate with our real life counter parts.

How many of us have grown accustom to the Camraderie?

How often have we flown long distances and talked of Hunting, Fishing, Families,Girls, and many other things, that would of held a conversation 60 years ago.

Only conversation I have often enough in a 1940's aircraft I'm sure they never had is.
So what Vid card you using,Processor, bla bla bla. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

We can simulate true wingman tactics and feel the satisfaction of saving our wingman and working well together. We can also feel the remorse of a defeat, (nothing as strong as a real life defeat by no means) But we can feel it.

I am truley glad to be involved in all this, even if it has no true purpose in Real life.

Wallstein
05-16-2005, 05:29 PM
Originally posted by Chuck_Older:
Have a beer?

I need a schnaps!

Atomic_Marten
05-16-2005, 05:33 PM
Originally posted by LStarosta:
Get a pilot's license. You have NO IDEA how much IL2 helps you with your airmanship.

I tend to agree.
I have never flown an aircraft myself, but seems to me that IL-2 can be a 'very good training program'. I mean, those who play it for some time get a 'general' idea what it is all about.

Of course one thing is game and another is real thing, but for sure IL-2 can be educative in many ways.

About WW2 vets.. I also bet many of them would like to fly planes in iL-2 in their younger days. Too bad that happened too late for them.

danjama
05-16-2005, 05:38 PM
I am truley glad to be involved in all this, even if it has no true purpose in Real life.

Well said T_O_A_D and the rest of course. This is a good post. Its funny the other day, i was flying B17 and 2 other guys were escorting me. We spent a good 2 hours gettin perfect formation, and chattin etc it was really good. Makes me wonder what guys were talking about on their planes, 60 odd years ago on the way to a target. ~S~ to all of them pilots. And to all of you for such a good experience.

Jaco_Erdwurm
05-16-2005, 06:08 PM
They where probably being quiet with their eyes bugging outta their heads trying to find the bad guys so they didnt get dead!!!
Seriously though this game is great It is my only solace and I enjoy the flying and meeting new people ,even if after 4 years I still suck,lol, its funny you should metion the B-17 flight, some of the most fun I ve had was three friends flying bomber positions ,we didnt really get much done but,we sure had a blast before we died

Aero_Shodanjo
05-16-2005, 09:45 PM
Not a story about WWII vet but I will never forget about two months ago when my father and I talked one night while watching the in-game tracks played.

He was trained in a AT-6, and later flew MiG-15 for some time before transferred as a navigator in Tu-16 bomber.

He was amazed at the sim when the track started to show but moments later it seemed that there's deep grief in his eyes when he said that if only they had such sim like this back then, it would be a life saver for many.

24 out of 60 of his friends and numerous tutors died in the academy in many training accidents.

T_O_A_D
05-16-2005, 09:55 PM
He was amazed at the sim when the track started to show but moments later it seemed that there's deep grief in his eyes when he said that if only they had such sim like this back then, it would be a life saver for many.

24 out of 60 of his friends and numerous tutors died in the academy in many training accidents.

Good Point! As mentioned above just the over and over repetition of screw up would cause you to correctly act with out thinking to save your life I'm sure.

I know practicing with a R/C simulator did just that for me once I started flying the real R/C planes. My thumbs just do as needed without me thinking about it.

han freak solo
05-16-2005, 10:00 PM
M_A_N_I_A_C_: I haven't seen Eddie in years, awesome! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif


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Years ago I got a free copy of a sim called ProPilot (I think). It didn't come with a manual. The only way I got the virtual Cessna off the ground was remembering what I had learned as a student pilot a decade and a half before. The ProPilot I had only worked with the complex engine start up procedure.

After that it was CFS1 and now I'm here. Definitely the hardest, most rewarding sim I've experienced! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

The flight simulators (non-computer) we had in the mid-eighties were only table top instrument panels that controlled a pencil that plotted a path on a piece of paper that let you practice navigation. It was good for nothing else. Quite boring. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

Owlsphone
05-16-2005, 10:44 PM
I think many people would be surprised at how much these simulators improve our flying abilities. I have been using flight simulators since about 1990. When I finally began taking flight lessons last summer, the transition was easier than I had imagined. Everything felt so natural and it was reflected in my piloting abilities. My instructor was so impressed with my ability to handle the airplane that I was landing on my own on the first lesson.

I don't believe that I was an extreme example and I don't believe that my experience would be that dissimilar to other flight sim fans' real flying experiences. Flight sim fans have an enormous advantage when they start flying for real than someone that just decides one day that getting their license would be cool.

I think a lot of lives could have been saved if simulators could have been used way back when, instead of just sending young pilots into the air and hoping they don't crash.

I know I've been wanting to get my grandfather into the game for a while now as he was a naval pilot many years ago. But I think the whole technology thing is what is keeping me from showing him (and he lives 1000 miles away). I think if he were proficient on a computer and had decent hardware I would show him...but what do I say to him if he needs a new graphics card, or his computer isn't up to snuff? I hardly believe my grandfather will spend hundreds of dollars on something he isn't even sure about.

Sorry for the rant, but I think lack of computer education is holding some of those older guys back. I bet most don't even know that simulators like these exist.

T_O_A_D
05-16-2005, 11:40 PM
I got an ex Navy pilot at work he flew in the 50's the F-8 and several other aircraft. I have told him all about it and he wants in, I just got to get him all set up.

I too beleive the PC scares them off.

We as a younger generation sort of owe it to our elders, to make sure they come along with us for the ride.

If not for them we may or may not have, today as we do.