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View Full Version : dieing to know the way to become a good fighter pilot!



skyhigh2011
07-22-2011, 10:14 AM
Guys, I'm dieing to know the manuevers to become a good fighter pilot !

Boosher
07-22-2011, 10:47 AM
Nuggets Guide to Getting off the Ground (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/23110283/m/9121094645), by Bearcat

b2spirita
07-22-2011, 11:43 AM
Practice im afraid. Its not amazingly fun advice, but its true.

If you post what particular planes youa re flying, im sure that people will offer advice best suited for them.

Good luck!

GratedLeeman
07-22-2011, 12:16 PM
get shot down a few times. learn from the mistakes you made.

TipsyTed
07-22-2011, 03:48 PM
Get to play online, get on teamspeak and don't hesitate to ask - about anything.

Fastest way to grow your skills, guaranteed.

Bearcat99
07-22-2011, 06:54 PM
Originally posted by b2spirita:
Practice im afraid. Its not amazingly fun advice, but its true.
Good luck!

This....

The Nugget's Guide will give you a good way to practice if you are new... but practice is the key.. and believe me.. I still get my tail handed to me regularly and I have been flying this sim for almost 10 years..

I will say pick a plane and try to stick with it.. and try to practice flying as much as fighting.

Tully__
07-23-2011, 12:43 AM
A study done some time in the last ten or fifteen years looked for common factors among the elite in many, many different disciplines including various athletic activities, musicians, mathematicians, business men, artists, dancers, chess players and so on. The common factor other than a little bit of talent in the chosen discipline turned out to be over 10,000 hours of concentrated practice. The merely very good had hundreds or thousands of hours, but the turning point for elite level seemed to be around the 10,000 hour mark give or take a little.

Badsight-
07-23-2011, 02:50 AM
Originally posted by Tully__:
A study done some time in the last ten or fifteen years looked for common factors among the elite in many, many different disciplines including various athletic activities, musicians, mathematicians, business men, artists, dancers, chess players and so on. The common factor other than a little bit of talent in the chosen discipline turned out to be over 10,000 hours of concentrated practice. The merely very good had hundreds or thousands of hours, but the turning point for elite level seemed to be around the 10,000 hour mark give or take a little. normally id agree with exactly that

time spent at practice

but in my time with IL2 there were guys who came along as johnny-come-latelys who got the hang of countering moves & tricks very fast

guys who went on to being abel to fully defend themselves at the edge of TnB limits within months against players who had years at it

idonno
07-23-2011, 08:21 AM
Originally posted by Badsight-:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Tully__:
The common factor other than a little bit of talent in the chosen discipline turned out to be over 10,000 hours of concentrated practice.


...but in my time with IL2 there were guys who came along as johnny-come-latelys who got the hang of countering moves & tricks very fast

guys who went on to being abel to fully defend themselves at the edge of TnB limits within months against players who had years at it
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

There's a difference between flying this sim for years and "concentrated practice".

Many people have an attitude that says "well, this is just as good as I can be", while the ones who get good quickly would never entertain such a thought. They make more of an effort to learn from each fight, believing that they can do better, and the other guys just click the fly button and do the same things over and over again.

Getting some training also makes a huge difference. "Practice doesn’t make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect."
I used to fly the Warbirds sim. They have a group of volunteer trainers who are very good. I had been flying there for years without ever getting any training from them when the new guy I had recently started flying with decided to go through the process to become a trainer. In a just few months he was at least as good as I was, and I was pretty good. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

My current wingman started with me when he was fairly new to combat flight sims. I worked with him one-on-one, not just having dogfights, but training, showing him things and explaining things to him, and telling him what he was doing right and what he was doing wrong even as we were fighting. It wasn't long before we starting having epic one-on-one battles. I'm not trying to take all the credit. I know he picked up a few things on his own, but there's no question that he wouldn't have gotten to the level he's at so quickly without training.

Skyhigh2011, if you're interested, check out my Recruiting Post (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/48310655/m/9771043336).

Badsight-
07-23-2011, 01:56 PM
the people i was refferring too were lone wolfs

having been in squad training situations tho i fully understand where your coming from - & mostly agree

BillSwagger
07-24-2011, 02:18 AM
Many people have an attitude that says "well, this is just as good as I can be", while the ones who get good quickly would never entertain such a thought. They make more of an effort to learn from each fight, believing that they can do better, and the other guys just click the fly button and do the same things over and over again.


I agree.

For me, it was paying attention that helped me get better.
I would watch my opponents, particularly what they did in situations where i had the upper hand, which gave me some direction as to what works and what doesn't when the tables were turned.

If you really want to get good, this is true at anything a person does, you have to make a concentrated effort at it.
It is attention to detail and sensitivity to change that drive the learning process, and a person who wants to win will be properly motivated to get better.
There is no one maneuver or regimen that works, and after some time i learned that timing and fluidity through out different engagements worked better than the old yank and bank style; pluss, it was more entertaining for me.
Just know that you have to get shot down a lot to even learn it in the first place. No one picked up their stick(s) and was good right of the box, so give it time and don't be discouraged if your not acing everyone online like i do. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif



Bill