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blazer-glory
05-22-2006, 10:49 AM
Was any parts of downed german planes used to advance our own airforce's technology?

Agamemnon22
05-22-2006, 11:32 AM
Not sure if it was the direct cause, but finding out Bf109's had fuel injection inspired the RAF to fit it on Spitfires as well.

berg417448
05-22-2006, 12:04 PM
Originally posted by blazer-glory:
Was any parts of downed german planes used to advance our own airforce's technology?

It was common for all sides to examine captured equipment to see if it could lead to improving their own weapons. For example:

1.After capturing a British H2S radar set from a downed Wellington, the Germans copied the magnetron.

2.German troops captured American "bazooka" in Africa, they noticed that it was superior to the Panzerb├╝chsen they had been using. The Bazooka was sent to engineers in Germany for analysis. The result was the Panzerschreck, which was more powerful than the bazooka.

3. The German sGrW42 heavy mortar was a developed directly from the Soviet 120mm mortar captured at one defense plant in Kharkov. The sGrW42 was used until the end of WWII.

4. The Germans copied the British STEN gun, and called it the MP 3008. The 9 mm MP 3008 was a substitute standard submachine gun manufactured toward the end of the war. The weapon was almost identical to the Sten except it used a vertical magazine instead of horizontal.

AVGWarhawk
05-22-2006, 02:28 PM
Yes, quite often the allies took and used what they could find. A zero was taken after a pilot had crashed landed it on an island. It was relatively undamaged. It was studied and what we know as the Hellcat was created by the study of the zero and it flight characteristics. The zero was dominant in the pacific theater until the arrival of the P-38, Hellcat, and Corsair. So from 1938 to 1943, the zero was the bird to watch out for.

blazer-glory
05-22-2006, 02:34 PM
Thanks. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Foo.bar
05-22-2006, 02:37 PM
berg, i think you misunderstood blazer's question http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Kocur_
05-22-2006, 03:08 PM
Originally posted by AVGWarhawk:
So from 1938 to 1943, the zero was the bird to watch out for.

Especially in 1938 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
A6M1 first flew on 1st April 1939. First serial A6M2 were ready in June 1940 and didnt see combat until August 1940http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

horseback
05-22-2006, 03:34 PM
Originally posted by AVGWarhawk:
Yes, quite often the allies took and used what they could find. A zero was taken after a pilot had crashed landed it on an island. It was relatively undamaged. It was studied and what we know as the Hellcat was created by the study of the zero and it flight characteristics. The zero was dominant in the pacific theater until the arrival of the P-38, Hellcat, and Corsair. So from 1938 to 1943, the zero was the bird to watch out for. The Hellcat's basic design was already in place and the first model was being built by the time the Aleutian Zero was recovered. The only meaningful change after that point in the design was the engine, from a Wright radial to the Pratt & Whitny R-2800, resulting in the XF6F-3.

The primary use of the captured Zero was to destroy any misconceptions about the Zero's (and Japanese) supposed inferiority. It was also used for confirmation of the Corsair & Hellcat's best tactics against it.

cheers

horseback

Waldo.Pepper
05-22-2006, 05:47 PM
1.After capturing a British H2S radar set from a downed Wellington


A minor correction but it was not a Wellington that was carrying the H2S that the Germans rebuilt. It was a Stirling that was shot down.

ImpStarDuece
05-22-2006, 06:23 PM
Originally posted by Agamemnon22:
Not sure if it was the direct cause, but finding out Bf109's had fuel injection inspired the RAF to fit it on Spitfires as well.

The Spitfire always had a carburettor, never direct fuel injection.

rugame
05-22-2006, 06:27 PM
I am not sure but was it the germans who fisrt used Nitrous and other addiatives to give boost, or was it a common practice?

AVG_WarHawk
05-22-2006, 06:55 PM
Originally posted by rugame:
I am not sure but was it the germans who fisrt used Nitrous and other addiatives to give boost, or was it a common practice?

Nitrous was first developed by the English in the 1700's and used first during WWII by allied aircraft for emergency boast.

ImpStarDuece
05-22-2006, 06:56 PM
N20 was common on many night fighter Mosquito marks.

SkyChimp
05-22-2006, 07:07 PM
Originally posted by blazer-glory:
Was any parts of downed german planes used to advance our own airforce's technology?

No.

However, if the Germans happened to get their hands on US weapons, they quickly copied them since they were better than anything the Germans had.

WWMaxGunz
05-22-2006, 08:09 PM
Please name some.

blakduk
05-22-2006, 08:21 PM
One of the best examples of captured technology was the fuel cans the Germans used in North Africa.
The allies complained that the square cans they were using to transport fuel were too fragile. They sent some captured German fuel cans back to Britain to be reverse-engineered. They were much more robust and easier to use- they were called 'Jerry Cans' and are still called that today in most English-speaking countries.

SkyChimp
05-22-2006, 09:51 PM
Originally posted by WWMaxGunz:
Please name some.

OK. Forevermore the MG42 shall be known as Wilber.

FluffyDucks
05-23-2006, 02:47 AM
Naughty SkyChimp....go back to your cage. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Aaron_GT
05-23-2006, 04:19 AM
The weapon was almost identical to the Sten except it used a vertical magazine instead of horizontal.

One some models of the Sten the magazine could be rotated to the vertical if so desired.

alert_1
05-23-2006, 06:00 AM
Great example was germanm BMW003/JUMO004 jet engines that were copied by soviet as RD10/20 just in time to counter LW in Yak15/MiG9 in famous '46 campaign!
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif

WOLFMondo
05-23-2006, 06:07 AM
Originally posted by blazer-glory:
Was any parts of downed german planes used to advance our own airforce's technology?

Yes. Check out the origins of the radiators used on the Bristol Centaurus powered Hawker aircraft. Copied right from the 190.

WWMaxGunz
05-23-2006, 08:06 AM
Wilber? We had exactly what before the MG42 that was equal to the MG42?
Or is that from a Russian MG?
Perhaps MG42 used some part or feature of an Allied MG?
Really, I'd like to know the details and not play a game of Clue.

Kocur_
05-23-2006, 08:11 AM
Originally posted by Aaron_GT:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">The weapon was almost identical to the Sten except it used a vertical magazine instead of horizontal.

One some models of the Sten the magazine could be rotated to the vertical if so desired. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

In all Stens, except for Mk.III it was possible to pull magazine well catch and rotate it by 90 deg to cover both feeding and ejection ports in receiver walls (apart from low quality magazines, it was main reason for Sten jams, when held by magazine, not barrel shroud as should be). But it was only transport position, you couldnt fire Sten with magazine well in any other position than horizontal. In MP3008 like in Thompson, MP40 or PPS magazine well was fixed in vertical position.