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Gavski2
04-24-2007, 01:40 PM
I'm just learning manual plotting and targeting.I have followed several tutorials and have learned how to find range, speed and AOB and enter them in the TDC - I have a problem with the bearing dial (far left) in the TDC, I have no idea what bearing it relates to and how to set it??? it clearly has an effect on the overall solution,
can anyone help,

cheers.

Gavski2
04-24-2007, 01:40 PM
I'm just learning manual plotting and targeting.I have followed several tutorials and have learned how to find range, speed and AOB and enter them in the TDC - I have a problem with the bearing dial (far left) in the TDC, I have no idea what bearing it relates to and how to set it??? it clearly has an effect on the overall solution,
can anyone help,

cheers.

Foehammer-1
04-24-2007, 02:55 PM
Set bearing with the periscope. The vertical crosshair is the bearing you'll be inputting. Just make sure to press the check mark to enter it

hueywolf123
04-24-2007, 10:41 PM
If you are learning, make sure to lock the view, AOB is determined by the view from your target, looking back at yourself.
Target manual, the ask the WE to target and compare the results, as you get closer, you get more confident and can give it a go yourself.
It doesn't hurt to go to the academy between missions either, hones your skill

Gavski2
04-25-2007, 03:46 AM
Thanks - community manual is very helpful.

Funkasoar
04-25-2007, 05:46 AM
AoB threw me off for the longest time. I figured out eventually that AoB is an extrapolation of target course based on her profile to you.

This also means that should you learn her course ahead of time (like stalking a convoy) you can turn the target heading into AoB.

Bearing in the TDC only means which direction you're pointing your periscope as this is where the torpedo will be targeted.

For links to Manual TDC tutorials and video demonstrations see my post in this thread:
http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/857101043/m/2481080355

geoffwessex
04-25-2007, 07:12 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Funkasoar:
This also means that should you learn her course ahead of time (like stalking a convoy) you can turn the target heading into AoB.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

IRL it's the other way round - the submarine observer estimates the AOB and it becomes one of the factors in working out the target course. It was (and is) only achieved with experience. The course is (IRL) worked out from a series of periscope looks, giving range and bearing each time, with the estimated AOB and the speed estimated by sonar added for extra 'clues'. These ranges and bearings are plotted on the ops plot and if the 'look intervals' are timed, the speed can also be worked out. The AOB was really just supplementary information.

Funkasoar
04-25-2007, 08:04 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by geoffwessex:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Funkasoar:
This also means that should you learn her course ahead of time (like stalking a convoy) you can turn the target heading into AoB.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

IRL it's the other way round - the submarine observer estimates the AOB and it becomes one of the factors in working out the target course. It was (and is) only achieved with experience. The course is (IRL) worked out from a series of periscope looks, giving range and bearing each time, with the estimated AOB and the speed estimated by sonar added for extra 'clues'. These ranges and bearings are plotted on the ops plot and if the 'look intervals' are timed, the speed can also be worked out. The AOB was really just supplementary information. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Of course. But in this game you need to play it a bit different than real life sadly.

Apparently the German TDC in real life had a "Target Course" dial and once you knew his course you entered that and got the AoB calculated by the TDC automatically. It was the American subs that relied on AoB as their primary course solver.

Both work in the right situation. But when I'm lining up a bunch of ships in a convoy, that German TDC would be so much easier since then the only thing that would need changing for every shot would be range since every ship is on the same course.

My point, however, is that you can learn Course if you're stalking a convoy by getting the range and bearing to the nearest target by asking your Watch Officer and using the stopwatch and the map to determine course and speed. That way you can always set up the AoB by doing a little math when you're faced with a totally dark night where its hard to discern AoB.

geoffwessex
04-25-2007, 11:41 AM
Quite right, Funkasoar. No end of interesting things to do in this game if you play on high realism. There aren't many things that they got wrong, even in plain unmodded SH3. Good hunting!

Incidentally, I just played about the easiest patrol of my third career - 42nd patrol, May 1944, took out 8 merchants and 3 destroyers - last time I got to 1944 in a career I could hardly get out of harbour! Of course, I don't start a game unless I've got a lot of time to spare, and even then I get about 6 saves per patrol and spread it out over 2 or 3 real-time days. Totally absorbing.