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darksky1986
07-09-2007, 05:02 PM
Inverted flight should be very bad for most if not all WW2 era engines. In the current build, there are no ill effects from negative G maneuvres - also oil pressure doesn't seem to change whatsoever from negative G flying.

http://www.zenoswarbirdvideos.com/P38.html

The video shown on this page describes how flying inverted in the P-38 will damage the engines if extended beyond 10 seconds - in the 4.08m version of Il2 1946, inverted flight can be carried out indefinitely and at a high power setting without sustaining oil pressure change or any damage.

darksky1986
07-09-2007, 05:02 PM
Inverted flight should be very bad for most if not all WW2 era engines. In the current build, there are no ill effects from negative G maneuvres - also oil pressure doesn't seem to change whatsoever from negative G flying.

http://www.zenoswarbirdvideos.com/P38.html

The video shown on this page describes how flying inverted in the P-38 will damage the engines if extended beyond 10 seconds - in the 4.08m version of Il2 1946, inverted flight can be carried out indefinitely and at a high power setting without sustaining oil pressure change or any damage.

VW-IceFire
07-09-2007, 05:13 PM
Its true.

stalkervision
07-09-2007, 06:13 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by darksky1986:
Inverted flight should be very bad for most if not all WW2 era engines. In the current build, there are no ill effects from negative G maneuvres - also oil pressure doesn't seem to change whatsoever from negative G flying.

http://www.zenoswarbirdvideos.com/P38.html

The video shown on this page describes how flying inverted in the P-38 will damage the engines if extended beyond 10 seconds - in the 4.08m version of Il2 1946, inverted flight can be carried out indefinitely and at a high power setting without sustaining oil pressure change or any damage. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Not in the 109 with fuel injection I bet.. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

VW-IceFire
07-09-2007, 07:31 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by stalkervision:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by darksky1986:
Inverted flight should be very bad for most if not all WW2 era engines. In the current build, there are no ill effects from negative G maneuvres - also oil pressure doesn't seem to change whatsoever from negative G flying.

http://www.zenoswarbirdvideos.com/P38.html

The video shown on this page describes how flying inverted in the P-38 will damage the engines if extended beyond 10 seconds - in the 4.08m version of Il2 1946, inverted flight can be carried out indefinitely and at a high power setting without sustaining oil pressure change or any damage. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Not in the 109 with fuel injection I bet.. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Fuel injection just means that the engine isn't going to starve of fuel if it immediately enters inverted or negative G flight. The oil and coolant systems are still reliant on gravity feed in one way or another. Not a single WWII plane can fly inverted for any significant period or enter into a prolonged negative G situation. Not that many pilots would enjoy the huge headrush for very long either...

stalkervision
07-11-2007, 07:24 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by VW-IceFire:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by stalkervision:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by darksky1986:
Inverted flight should be very bad for most if not all WW2 era engines. In the current build, there are no ill effects from negative G maneuvres - also oil pressure doesn't seem to change whatsoever from negative G flying.

http://www.zenoswarbirdvideos.com/P38.html

The video shown on this page describes how flying inverted in the P-38 will damage the engines if extended beyond 10 seconds - in the 4.08m version of Il2 1946, inverted flight can be carried out indefinitely and at a high power setting without sustaining oil pressure change or any damage. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Not in the 109 with fuel injection I bet.. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Fuel injection just means that the engine isn't going to starve of fuel if it immediately enters inverted or negative G flight. The oil and coolant systems are still reliant on gravity feed in one way or another. Not a single WWII plane can fly inverted for any significant period or enter into a prolonged negative G situation. Not that many pilots would enjoy the huge headrush for very long either... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It's an inverted v with a "dry sump pressure system" which is also found in acrobatic planes. Of course the cooling system as you say may be another matter..

Specifications (DB 601Aa)

DB 601A, partially sectionedGeneral characteristics
Type: 12-cylinder liquid-cooled supercharged 60? inverted Vee aircraft piston engine
Bore: 150 mm (5.91 in)
Stroke: 160 mm (6.30 in)
Displacement: 33.9 L (2,070 inĀ³)
Length: 1,722 mm (68 in)
Dry weight: 590 kg (1,320 lb)
Components
Valvetrain: Two intake and two sodium-cooled exhaust valves per cylinder actuated via a single overhead camshaft per cylinder block.
Supercharger: Gear-driven single-stage single-speed centrifugal type supercharger
Fuel system: Fuel injection
Oil system: Dry sump with one pressure and two scavenge pumps
Cooling system: Liquid-cooled

and as you say why would anyone like to fly inverted for long periods of time anyway? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

RAF_Pagan
07-11-2007, 09:54 AM
How about the air-cooled radial engines? The only thing I can think of that might suffer is bearing lubrication.

hi_stik
07-13-2007, 03:31 PM
the training video for the F4U, viewable at Zeno's, it's mentioned that the Corsair should not be inverted for more than 3 seconds...

I either saw it there, or on the History Channel show dedicated to the Corsair...I'm pretty sure, though, it was at Zeno's.

stansdds
07-14-2007, 02:43 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by RAF_Pagan:
How about the air-cooled radial engines? The only thing I can think of that might suffer is bearing lubrication. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yep, definitely oil pressure drop, but the fuel tanks were not pressurized, so fuel starvation could also occur.

TgD Thunderbolt56
07-25-2007, 09:07 AM
I don't fly inverted for more than a few seconds at a time anyway...the point is moot.

Hawgdog
08-08-2007, 03:45 PM
And extensive testing proves the P-47 guns become twice as powerful with no dispersion