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View Full Version : MC.200 engine cut-out



buchtik
04-17-2009, 09:11 AM
I was flying the MC.200 and suddenly my engine stopped and I had to start it again.Why is that happening?

buchtik
04-17-2009, 09:11 AM
I was flying the MC.200 and suddenly my engine stopped and I had to start it again.Why is that happening?

csThor
04-17-2009, 09:24 AM
The engines of the MC.200, the Hurricanes, the I-153 and the I-16 (plus a few others, which escape me right now) do have carburettors and not the more advanced direct fuel injection. As such they don't like negative Gs (which you reach when you push down the nose of your aircraft), because the carburettors can't keep the fuel flowing under negative Gs. The engine sputters and - if the pilot does not stop pushing negative Gs - dies from fuel starvation.

danjama
04-17-2009, 10:43 AM
In other words roll onto your back to dive, dont push down.

mortoma
04-21-2009, 09:23 AM
Only problem is this negative G cutout is not handled very well in IL2 and is unrealistic. Total engine stoppage is rare in these events because the prop is usually still spinning after fuel flow is restored. If the prop is spinning ( just like it would when a starter motor was engaged ) then the motor will restart automatically. But in IL2 it stops and does not restart unless you manually engage the starter by hitting the "I" key or whatever command you use for engine start.

I had this happen in real life on my very first flight with my brand new pilot's license! Not due to negative G though, just being ham fisted with the mixture knob. But the effect is the same!! I was flying at 4,500 ft. over Indiana and accidentally pulled the mixture out too far and the engine quit. But that was only for a second because I pushed it back in and it came back to life right away.

I was never taught how to lean out properly and safely. Part of the problem is that flight instructors stay away from teach you leaning techniques at higher altitudes. And this is a well known problem because I guess they are leery of teaching this due to possible engine stoppage. Most flight instructors in low elevation places like the midwest avoid it by keeping your lessons below 3,500 feet ASL. I suppose out here in Utah where I live now they can't avoid it because even the lower elevation airports are above 4,000 feet ASL. So where you take your flying lessons dictates whether or not your instructor will teach it. And of course some instructors might do it anyway if they are not scared to and are responsible.