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ARCHIE_CALVERT
01-26-2006, 12:14 PM
Which Aircraft of the Second World War was the design that encompassed the era, an icon to the masses of both then and now and made the biggest outcome on the War€¦ http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

As if there was any doubt... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

ARCHIE_CALVERT
01-26-2006, 12:14 PM
Which Aircraft of the Second World War was the design that encompassed the era, an icon to the masses of both then and now and made the biggest outcome on the War€¦ http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

As if there was any doubt... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Waldo.Pepper
01-26-2006, 12:25 PM
Sadly, my head says Mustang, but my heart says the one you want to hear. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

berg417448
01-26-2006, 12:29 PM
DC-3 / C-47

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

russ.nl
01-26-2006, 12:43 PM
The spitfire http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif
http://www.civilwarmall.com/bookseller/images/Spitfire.jpg
But the C-47 is a good candidate to. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif
http://www.mjgkramer.com/aircraft/C47_0147.jpg

Philipscdrw
01-26-2006, 12:46 PM
That plane, what was it called? They made a sim about it once. Oh yeah, the Il-2 Shturmovik.

Viper2005_
01-26-2006, 01:00 PM
The Tiger Moth.

Hurricane_320
01-26-2006, 01:05 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Viper2005_:
The Tiger Moth. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

NO

djetz
01-26-2006, 01:22 PM
I'm not a huge fan of it, but I'd say the Bf109.

What do I win?

danjama
01-26-2006, 01:26 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ARCHIE_CALVERT:
Which Aircraft of the Second World War was the design that encompassed the era, an icon to the masses of both then and now and made the biggest outcome on the War€¦ http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

As if there was any doubt... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Spitfire!!

Only other to come close IMO is the B17, but even then not really, Spit all the way

Capt_Haddock
01-26-2006, 01:27 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ARCHIE_CALVERT:
Which Aircraft of the Second World War was the design that encompassed the era, an icon to the masses of both then and now and made the biggest outcome on the War€¦ </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sadly the B-29...

http://www.haddock.f2s.com/sig/F19bannerh3.jpg

Low_Flyer_MkII
01-26-2006, 02:04 PM
Do I have to repeat myself? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

Originally posted by Low_Flyer_MkII:
One of the things to take into consideration when discussing the Spitfire is it's place in the British psyche. It normally appears in any top ten list of great things about Britain. Can the same be said for the Bf109 or Fw190 when making a top ten list of great things about Germany? Or of the P-51 when making a list for the U.S.A? They are all very good fighter aeroplanes, but none can even come close to rivalling the Spifire in the affections of her native population. I'm not talking about flight-sim geeks and planespotters here - I'm talking about the entire literate population.

Want to test this theory out? Walk into a British pub wearing a Spitfire lapel pin or carrying a book/magazine with a Spifire on the cover. You will find people of all ages and both sexes willing to instigate conversation with you. Now try it with steam trains or airliners - feeling a little lonely? Attracted a weirdo? I rest my case.

To the British, the Spitfire is much more than a very good fighter aeroplane (which it undoubtedly was), it's a symbol of national identity; a beautifully potent reminder of a glorious past, a cherished memento of a time when - against all the odds - Britain stood up to a dark threat to humanity and played a leading role in making the world a better place. It's a part of British national heritage - you might as well try and belittle Shakespeare or real ale. The Spitfire is up there with a decent cup of tea, fish and chips, curry, Churchill, Nelson and the Beatles - you'll never convince the British otherwise. And quite rightly so.

Bear that in mind next time you dis' the Spit.

ploughman
01-26-2006, 02:11 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/351.gif

HuninMunin
01-26-2006, 02:21 PM
If you ask for the best airplane in conception, I have to say the 109.
The reality of the war proved it to be an outstanding weapon, maybe superior to any other in terms of a cost effectiveness, fighting power and combat readiness.
It shure had its flaws, as any other great fighter, but the 109 had to stand up to the most challenging envoirments, multiple (all different) opponents and to greater opposing forces then all others had to.
Its not as pretty as the Spit thow http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

The plane that had the most effect on the war was undoubtly the B-29.

ploughman
01-26-2006, 02:50 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by HuninMunin:
If you ask for the best airplane in conception, I have to say the 109.
The reality of the war proved it to be an outstanding weapon, maybe superior to any other in terms of a cost effectiveness, fighting power and combat readiness.
It shure had its flaws, as any other great fighter, but the 109 had to stand up to the most challenging envoirments, multiple (all different) opponents and to greater opposing forces then all others had to.
Its not as pretty as the Spit thow http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

The plane that had the most effect on the war was undoubtly the B-29. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I understand your 109 fetish, I suffer from it too even though I hail from Spitfirengland but the B-29 having the most effect on the war!?! It didn't even serve in Europe, I conced that it devastated Japan's major industrial centres in a matter of months but Japan was shagged by then anyway and you didn't necessarily need a 3 billion dollar weapon's system to finish the Japanese off, married with the A-Bomb it said more to the Russians than it did to the Japanese. Super plane though, but too much too late.

p-11.cAce
01-26-2006, 04:08 PM
I think the average Joe on the street would point to a B-17 as the icon of the war before the B-29 or any of the fighter aircraft. I would also say that it had the largest influence on the war of any aircraft. Like it or not its the bombers that are the power in the air - fighters are there to protect the bombers. A fighter in wwII costs a few tens of thousands of $$$ and a few weeks (or less) to replace - A factory and its equipment may costs hundreds of thousands or more to replace. Take out enough production capacity and the war is over. Without heavy bombers the LW was never going to impact Russian or British (not to mention US production) in any significant way - nor could they wipe out the population base in any way approaching that achieved by the carpet bombing tactics employed by the Allies. In the publics mind it is the bombers that define WWII and the -17 is the king.

Capt_Haddock
01-26-2006, 04:17 PM
Refering to the original post, the B-29 "made the biggest outcome of the war"

The B-29 shaped in a single stroke the world we still live in. In two blows it started the "American Century".
No B-29, no cold war, no US dollar-based world economy.

http://www.haddock.f2s.com/sig/F19bannerh3.jpg

Low_Flyer_MkII
01-26-2006, 04:22 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Which Aircraft of the Second World War was the design that encompassed the era, an icon to the masses of both then and now </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I repeat, Spitfire http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

reverendkrv1972
01-26-2006, 04:45 PM
word Low Flyer...

couldn't have said it better myself http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Spitfire.

ARCHIE_CALVERT
01-26-2006, 04:48 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif B-17, B-29... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif Where do you think you would be if Britain had fallen... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

No little island to take the War to the Nazi's, Europe lost... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif America would have to learn to fight on two fronts for real this time and you might have had the B-29 but without the British and European scientists the Manhatten Project would have been a non starter... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Without the aircraft in question and you know what it is and the engine that powered it, the world would be a very different place to the one now present. And may I add we were bombing the enemy before you got your asses in gear and relised where you should have been from the start...

B-29... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Low_Flyer_MkII
01-26-2006, 07:06 PM
Don't wind the Yanks up too much, Archie - they might remind you where Browning machine-guns came from. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

Which reminds me...
Did you know that the Hispano cannon was based on a Russian design found in a captured I-16 donated to France by Franco after the Spanish civil war? Parts of the design were so far advanced that the French engineers just copied them and incorporated into their design, which in turn was made under license in the United Kingdom. Thinking they knew best, the British decided to mount the Hispano on its' side and use a drum magazine (hence the bubbles in cannon armed Spitfire wings). This system proved most unsatisfactory, the feeding mechanism causing problems that resulted in Hispano's being removed or witheld during the Battle of Britain (although when the guns actually worked, the pilots were impressed with the damage caused). Many refinements were made - including utilising high spec machinery originally intended for the manufacture of cigarettes - and the problem-free Hispano was refitted to the Spitfire to the delight of the RAF. However, in the ceaseless quest to improve performance, research was done into losing as much excess weight as possible, and the best solution found as far as the guns were concerned was to revert to the original Russian belt feed mechanism - manufactured to exact specs again by cigarette manufacturers. Now without the effective Hispano, the Mossie for one just wouldn't have been the same. Without such Mossie, 633 Squadron would never have been filmed, and my interest in WWII aviation might never have been awakened, depriving these boards of my rampant genius. So you can thank the Russians and the tobacco industry for all this.... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Tooz_69GIAP
01-26-2006, 07:12 PM
I'd go with the Lancaster or the Mosquito, but what Low Flyer says is true - just about anyone in the UK who isn't a moron will recognise a Spitfire, and those who don't will at the very least look it over and admire it.

BfHeFwMe
01-26-2006, 09:37 PM
C-47, Eisenhower himself called it the most important weapons system of the war, the bloodline of the effort.

Badsight.
01-26-2006, 10:35 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Tooz_69GIAP:
just about anyone in the UK who isn't a moron will recognise a Spitfire. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>so the Spitfire isnt given the recognition it deserves back at home then ?

Old_Canuck
01-27-2006, 12:27 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by berg417448:
DC-3 / C-47

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

==========================

QUOTE]Originally posted by BfHeFwMe:
C-47, Eisenhower himself called it the most important weapons system of the war, the bloodline of the effort.[/QUOTE]

======================

Count me in for three votes. Eisenhower said "Four things won the Second World War€"the bazooka, the Jeep, the atom bomb, and the C€"47 Gooney Bird."


Here's the whole story from globalsecurity.org:

"C-47 Skytrain
The DC-3, which made air travel popular and airline profits possible, is universally recognized as the greatest airplane of its time. Some would argue that it is the greatest of all time. Design work began in 1934 at the insistence of C.R. Smith, president of American Airlines. Smith wanted two new planes - a longer DC-2 that would carry more day passengers and another with railroad-type sleeping berths, to carry overnight passengers.

The DC-3 did not go unnoticed by one of Douglas's oldest customers - the U.S. Army. In addition to the 455 DC-3 commercial transports built for the airlines, 10,174 were produced as military transports during World War II. For both airline and military use, the DC-3 proved to be tough, flexible, and easy to operate and maintain. Its exploits during the war became the stuff of legend. Today, more than six decades after the last one was delivered, hundreds of DC-3s are still flying and still earning their keep by carrying passengers or cargo.

The military career of the Douglas DC series began in 1936 when the Army Air Corps ordered a pair of DC-2s under the designation C-32. A contract followed for 18 DC-2s in the C-33 freighter configuration and two more as C-34 staff transports. Then, in 1937, the Army ordered a plane built to its own specifications. It was a hybrid design that combined the fuselage of the DC-2 with a DC-3 tail. This was the sole C-38 prototype and it led to 35 production versions called the C-39. The C-39 represented the first serious effort by the Army to establish an airlift capability.

By 1941 the old Air Corps had been transformed into the Army Air Force and it selected a modified version of the DC-3 - the C-47 Skytrain - to become its standard transport aircraft. A reinforced fuselage floor and the addition of a large cargo door were the only major modifications. Other changes included the fitting of cargo hooks beneath the center wing section and the removal of the tail cone to mount a hook for towing gliders.

With Pratt & Whitney engines of 1,200 hp each, the C€"47 had a top speed of 220 mph with a maximum range of fifteen hundred miles. Its crew typically consisted of pilot and copilot and usually included a crew chief to oversee cargo handling. The wartime C€"47 transports discarded the roomy, twenty-one€"seat interiors of the airline version and installed bench seats along the fuselage walls to seat thirty-two passengers or twenty-seven troops in combat gear. Hospital transport conversions carried up to twenty-four stretcher cases, but medical evacuations in wartime carried several dozen wounded in harried evacua-tion flights. The big cargo door on the port side facilitated handling of military shipments of six thousand pounds in regular operations, although the C€"47s lifted thousands more in military emergencies on shorter hops.

As a supply plane, the C-47 could carry up to 6,000 pounds of cargo. It could also hold a fully assembled jeep or a 37-mm cannon. As a troop transport, it carried 28 soldiers in full combat gear. As a medical airlift plane, it could accommodate 14 stretcher patients and three nurses. Seven basic versions were built, and the aircraft was given at least 22 designations.

Every branch of the U.S military and all the major allied powers flew it. The U.S. Navy version was the R4D. The British and the Australians designated it the Dakota (a clever acronym comprised of the letters DACoTA for Douglas Aircraft Company Transport Aircraft). The aircraft operated from every continent in the world and participated in every major battle. By the end of World War II, more than 10,000 had been built. For all of its official and unofficial names, it came to be known universally as the Gooney Bird. General Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in Europe, termed it one of the most vital pieces of military equipment used in winning the war.

The ubiquity of the Skytrain-Dakota-Gooney Bird transport, and its ability to operate from very rough forward airstrips, made it familiar to millions of Allied forces stationed around the world. The C€"47 and its rel-atives not only pioneered in-theater wartime routes but also served as VIP transports, general personnel transports, troop carriers, glider tugs, paratroop assault transports, cargo transports, airborne ambulances, air-sea rescue craft, and special operations aircraft. Supporters of the airplane liked to quote a remark attributed to Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower: €œFour things won the Second World War€"the bazooka, the Jeep, the atom bomb, and the C€"47 Gooney Bird.€

By war€s end, some thirteen thousand C€"47 variants had been delivered, plus two thousand more built under license by foreign manufacturers. The C€"47 played a major role in postwar service, remaining in operational units through the 1960s C-47s remained in active military service long after the end of World War II. They played a critical role in the 1948 Berlin Airlift and saw action in the Korean and Vietnam wars.

Three World War II-era transport planes served in Korea: the C-46 Commando, the C-47 Skytrain, and the C-54 Skymaster. The three were designed to carry troops or equipment, and the C-47 and C-54 also had provisions to carry cargo under the fuselage. The Skytrain and the Skymaster could both carry paratroops, but the Commando proved inadequate for this mission because its tail often fouled the parachutes. All three aircraft filled an airlift role in Korea, supplying everything from aircraft engines, ammunition, medical supplies, rations, and fresh fruit. Some C-47s were modified to drop flares in advance of B-26s and F-82s on night raids. They also served as communication links between Tactical Air Control Centers and the ground target-spotting T-6 €œMosquito€ aircraft. Other Air Force C-47s air dropped intelligence agents behind enemy lines, supported escape and evasion efforts by downed aircrew, and supplied friendly forces with arms and communications equipment."

Friendly_flyer
01-27-2006, 01:06 AM
Oh yeah, Spitfire!

Even my "I hate it when you just stit there with those stupid planes" girlfriend recognices a Spitfire and think it's a nice looking plane. The C-47 is a very good nr 2, though.

marc_hawkins
01-27-2006, 01:42 AM
I may try to employ my own rampant genius here, you could say that the original question has been answered in that the design classic was the spitfire and the Dakota made the biggest contribution to the war. honourable mentions all round of course..

quote:
Originally posted by Tooz_69GIAP:
just about anyone in the UK who isn't a moron will recognise a Spitfire.

quote:
Originally posted by Badsight:
so the Spitfire isnt given the recognition it deserves back at home then ?

Plenty of morons about, some don't know there was a war on y'know....

RegRag1977
01-27-2006, 03:47 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gifHi there,

I fear it's the Spitfire. Even the last Redneck recognizes her beautiful and unique lines! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Like the Mustang, or the Corsair, we are taught from early age to bow before their total superiority! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

Axis aicraft are far less known http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif, though far more interesting (IMHO).

School teachers know about these (allied), even those in past axis countries. Most of the time, the "best" allied aicraft "knowledge" reflects the general aviation history ignorance! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

Allied Fighters, or "forteresses volantes",we all know that, were especially blessed by God, and could win the war, in a "pappy Boyington" way http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif!

Allez comprendre? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

stathem
01-27-2006, 05:06 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Capt_Haddock:
Refering to the original post, the B-29 "made the biggest outcome of the war"

The B-29 shaped in a single stroke the world we still live in. In two blows it started the "American Century".
No B-29, no cold war, no US dollar-based world economy.

http://www.haddock.f2s.com/sig/F19bannerh3.jpg </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Respectfully, I'd disagree. IMO the American century was started when the Luisitana was sunk.

p1ngu666
01-27-2006, 05:45 AM
hurri/spit

and mossie too http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Dunkelgrun
01-27-2006, 06:22 AM
The Department of Culture are running a vote to find the best British cultural icons.

Concorde will probably get in there along with the red phone box, the Mini and fish and chips, but there's only one military aircraft all over the front page (http://www.icons.org.uk/theicons) - the Spitfire!!!

As a Brit I'd say absolutely right, too http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Cheers!

Low_Flyer_MkII
01-27-2006, 06:30 AM
I feel kind of vindicated.... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

djetz
01-27-2006, 03:30 PM
Spitfire = english-speaking world only.

I think the spit was a much greater aircraft than the 109, but I also think that if you count the entire world rather than just the english-speaking part of it, the 109 has a greater recognition value.

Spitfires didn't mean jack on the eastern front. But everyone east or west knew what a 109 was.

If you take the pacific front into consideration, the zero is a hell of a lot more famous than anything else in the sky.

The spitfire is only an icon to the British and Commonwealth, the yanks are much more likely to think of the P51 when they think of a WW2 'plane.

I interpret the original question to mean what has the most widespread recognition value, and that'd have to be the 109. Everyone, all of europe, all of the soviet union, all of america, all the commonwealth, knew what a "Messerschmitt" was.

ploughman
01-27-2006, 03:34 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by djetz:
Spitfire = english-speaking world only.

I think the spit was a much greater aircraft than the 109, but I also think that if you count the entire world rather than just the english-speaking part of it, the 109 has a greater recognition value.

Spitfires didn't mean jack on the eastern front. But everyone east or west knew what a 109 was.

If you take the pacific front into consideration, the zero is a hell of a lot more famous than anything else in the sky.

The spitfire is only an icon to the British and Commonwealth, the yanks are much more likely to think of the P51 when they think of a WW2 'plane.

I interpret the original question to mean what has the most widespread recognition value, and that'd have to be the 109. Everyone, all of europe, all of the soviet union, all of america, all the commonwealth, knew what a "Messerschmitt" was. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I get where you're coming from but brand recognition does not equal design classic. Or at least I hope it doesn't.

major_setback
01-27-2006, 04:01 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Dunkelgrun:
The Department of Culture are running a vote to find the best British cultural icons.

Concorde will probably get in there along with the red phone box, the Mini and fish and chips, but there's only one military aircraft all over the front page (http://www.icons.org.uk/theicons) - the Spitfire!!!

As a Brit I'd say absolutely right, too http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Cheers! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>



Re: that poll.
I lived on a Routemaster bus for 3 months (they're a bu**er to push start!). The Routemaster should win : the most typical of all British icons.

http://www.icons.org.uk/theicons/collection/routemaster-bus/image_large

djetz
01-27-2006, 04:08 PM
Well, if you want the best design, that's easy: CAC CA-15

But a design "that encompassed the era, an icon to the masses of both then and now" is not the same as "made the biggest outcome on the war."

Biggest outcome is infinately arguable, and the 109 has a place in that argument, too. If the krauts had FW190s or Me 262s instead of 109s perhaps the Battle of Britain would have turned out differently.

But the design "that encompassed the era, an icon to the masses of both then and now" I'd still have to say the 109 has the numbers.

ARCHIE_CALVERT
01-27-2006, 04:10 PM
djetz... This fellow seems to me to possess but one idea, and that is a wrong one... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Thats you that is http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

djetz
01-27-2006, 04:14 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by djetz:
If the krauts had FW190s or Me 262s instead of 109s perhaps the Battle of Britain would have turned out differently. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Of course, I feel obliged to add that with G¶ring in charge and Hitler calling the shots, the luftwaffe would have lost the BoB with anything they were given.

djetz
01-27-2006, 04:21 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ARCHIE_CALVERT:
djetz... This fellow seems to me to possess but one idea, and that is a wrong one... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hurris made more of an actual contribution than the Spit to the BoB. And post BoB the Mossie and the Tyffie made much more of a contribution than the Spit.

Don't get me wrong, I love the Spit and I think it a far superior plane to the 109, but you're looking at the world through brit-centric goggles.

ARCHIE_CALVERT
01-27-2006, 04:50 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v187/Secudus/SpitMod04.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v187/Secudus/Spit001.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v187/Secudus/Spit02.jpg

"But you're looking at the world through brit-centric goggles."

It's the best way to look at the World...

major_setback
01-27-2006, 05:06 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ARCHIE_CALVERT:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v187/Secudus/SpitMod04.jpg

... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Where's that render from?

BaldieJr
01-27-2006, 05:13 PM
Thats a scan taken from the book

Fightin' Bratwursts!
English Air Power in World War II

LStarosta
01-27-2006, 05:15 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ARCHIE_CALVERT:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v187/Secudus/SpitMod04.jpg

... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


This REALLY reminds me of the Naboo Starfighter from Star Wars Ep.1.

Low_Flyer_MkII
01-27-2006, 05:16 PM
Poole Pottery? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

ARCHIE_CALVERT
01-27-2006, 05:36 PM
Which Aircraft of the Second World War was the design that encompassed the era, an icon to the masses of both then and now and made the biggest outcome on the War€¦

As if there was any doubt... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif


The Spitfire is The Classic, Design Classic€¦ http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v187/Secudus/SpitMod01.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v187/Secudus/SpitMod02.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v187/Secudus/SpitMod03.jpg

Me-109€¦ http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif B-17€¦ http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif B-29€¦ http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif Never in a million years, not even close... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif