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ninja_7_7
11-14-2010, 11:58 AM
I was always confused by this. Why didnt Ezio kill him? Because it said in history he died in 1503? Ezio killed innocent guards and hundreds of people but he wont kill the main problem of all this? I dont want the answer he didnt want to be like him or something clíche.

The_red_egg1
11-14-2010, 12:01 PM
Ezio lives by the creed.

He probably thought it wasn't worth it. Anyway, if he had killed him, there would be no Brotherhood http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

AubreyWilborn
11-14-2010, 12:03 PM
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Eh-don't dwell on it too hard. It was an emotional decision made in haste, and it is one he will probably regret in ACB.

But I definitely get where you're coming from. Ezio(especially if I'm playing him) can kill a hundred gurads-who are probably just poor folks trying to feed their families. But when he gets close to the grandmaster of templars, all he can give him is a beatdown?

jfighter777
11-14-2010, 12:04 PM
Perhaps because he tore from Rodrigo the one thing he wanted more than anything else, being the Prophet. So, he let Rodrigo live, knowing that this failure would haunt him for the rest of his life.

Also, maybe because it would have been killing out of anger, which he had not done since Vieri, and he saw it as wrong to kill while full of hate? IDK, maybe he will explain it to Machiavelli in ACB.

The Zoo Boy
11-14-2010, 12:10 PM
Gameplay Reason: Knowing that he was not the prophet was worse than death for Rodrigo. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Practical Reason: Maybe Ubisoft knew they were planning on another Ezio game, so saved his death for Brotherhood, where hopefully Ezio can poison him in 1503, instead of just stabbing him in 1499 (in real life, no one knew who did it, although it was suspected to be an accident by Cesare). http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

breakdown89
11-14-2010, 12:15 PM
I frankly thought it was made pretty clear in the game why he chose not to kill him. He knew that killing the man who was behind most of his family's murders would not bring them back, so he chose to spare him instead.....that's it.

ninja_7_7
11-14-2010, 12:22 PM
Originally posted by DeusEx89:
I frankly thought it was made pretty clear in the game why he chose not to kill him. He knew that killing the man who was behind most of his family's murders would not bring them back, so he chose to spare him instead.....that's it.
That is the answer I didnt want. That is a stupid excuse. I will kill guards and other hundreds of people but the one person who destroyed my life well he is alright. I will let him go.

breakdown89
11-14-2010, 12:23 PM
well i'm sure it wasn't easy on ezio either, but hey, take it or leave it.....lol.

mad_god87
11-15-2010, 08:07 PM
Examine the dialog that occurs between them at the end. This is not just a defeat for Rodrigo Borgia, whose entire existence has been dedicated to a falsehood, a destiny that was not his. It represents something far greater in the struggle for dominion. The Templars do not have a prophet after all, even in their most powerful leader. The Assassins do. As both sides begin to realize the consequences of this outcome, the symbolic result of the battle between the old Pope and the new assassin shifts the balance of power in a way that has ramifications for the world.

And that is why, we suspect, Ezio concludes with the famous words of Hassan-i Sabbah: "Nothing is true; everything is permitted". By invoking the Brotherhoodof the Assassins, Ezio is not just asserting what he represents buy demonstrating that he is not bound by any rule to slay an enemy already defeated. He has the power and the freedom of will to transcend.

Straight from the AC2 guide book...pretty straight forward if you ask me if you need an better answer than that your on your own...

Shadowchsr79
11-15-2010, 08:28 PM
That is a very good answer Mad God. I couldn't have said it better myself though I do have one question. Did he at least take the Papal Staff that was the second piece of Eden as well as the Apple? The idea of him leaving that item in the hand of the Templars really gives me the shivers. From what little I've seen of the trailers for Brotherhood it seems to center around the apple again. sighs, I guess I'll have to wait for the game to find out. Sorry that this went a bit off topic.

jlorence
11-15-2010, 08:32 PM
Because Ezio's an attention ***** and wasn't happy having only one game.

xsatanicjokerx
11-15-2010, 09:23 PM
Because in history Rodrigo was poisoned not stabbed

mad_god87
11-15-2010, 09:39 PM
In ACB trailers ive seen the pope holding the staff so he still has it also they get the apple at the siege of the villa

obliviondoll
11-16-2010, 08:13 AM
Originally posted by j_lorence:
Because Ezio's an attention ***** and wasn't happy having only one game.
I vote for this answer.

Most rational and well thought-out response so far.

None of that "because not killing him was worse" stuff.

/sarcasm.

Actually, leaving him alive and knowing he's NOT the prophet WOULD be worse than death. I was fairly sure that was the whole point. The whole "killing in anger is wrong" part was just a side-note which gave it a little extra push into awesome instead of just cool.

Shadowchsr79
11-16-2010, 11:23 AM
*Grumbles* I can live with him not killing Borgia but to leave a piece of Eden in the hands of the Templars was very foolish if you ask me. Lets hope he doesn't make the same mistake in Brotherhood.