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Deedsundone
06-30-2006, 01:05 PM
...or maybe not http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif
English words,spelled the same in swedish but with different meaning (and pronunciation).

English word first:Ask/Swedish meaning second:A little box.

Bad=Bath
Dog=Died
Fat=Dish,saucer
Fast=Solid,Firm,Fixed http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif
Get=Goat
Grind=Gate
Gift=Poision
River=Scratching
Rum=Room
****=Ending,finish
Spy=vomit
Tack=Thanks
Tall=Pine tree

Well,wasn´t this fun? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

ploughman
06-30-2006, 01:09 PM
Eh?

So which is first? Swegnlish or Engedish?

Pirschjaeger
06-30-2006, 01:17 PM
Originally posted by Ploughman:
Eh?

So which is first? Swegnlish or Engedish?

I thought it was ebonics. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

ploughman
06-30-2006, 01:47 PM
Grrrr...I'm going to have to look that up.

Pirschjaeger
06-30-2006, 07:03 PM
Icelandic Ebonics to be exact. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

BrewsterPilot
06-30-2006, 08:26 PM
Roligt! Tack f¶r att du "postade" den!

Dew-Claw
07-01-2006, 12:49 AM
****=Ending,finish

I find it funny 'cause the Swedish definition is exactly what your wife will do to your marriage if caught with the English definition of the word.

x6BL_Brando
07-01-2006, 02:07 AM
Fast=Stucked

English contains many words with two or more meanings - often contradictory.

Fast = speedy or quick, in English, but also = stuck. (Not 'stucked', there is no such word)
So we talk of 'making fast' when we secure one thing to another, and also 'fastening' for almost everything like that. E.g. I fasten my trousers with a zipper.

It gets worse. 'Stuck' is the past tense of 'stick'.
To 'Stick' means to fix to - like a stamp to a letter. A 'stick' is a smallish piece of wood - like a walking-stick, or a joy-stick http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
We also refer to a 'stick' of bombs - and "my old stick" is a colloquial term for a friend.

Worse even, to 'stick' also means to pierce or transfix. As in, 'I stick a pin through paper to hold it to the wall'

So you come back to 'stuck' - "I stuck my sword through his arm" - past tense.

Confusing, no? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Deedsundone
07-01-2006, 07:29 AM
Yup,got it....see,it is educational...for me http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Pirschjaeger
07-01-2006, 07:47 AM
It's good to see that we've stuck to the topic. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Speaking of "stuck", what the hell did I just step in? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

x6BL_Brando
07-01-2006, 07:48 AM
Get=Goat

Get = acquire or obtain in English. Like "I get 30,000 a year for working as a clerk"

Get (also)= go in English. Like "get out of my house!"

Oddly, a common phrase uses both get & goat: "s/he 'gets my goat'" is a colloquial way of saying "s/he annoys me"

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

B.

DuxCorvan
07-01-2006, 07:56 AM
Originally posted by x6BL_Brando:
a common phrase uses both get & goat: "s/he 'gets my goat'" is a colloquial way of saying "s/he annoys me"

Where are you from? That sounds kinda bumpkin to me... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

x6BL_Brando
07-01-2006, 08:50 AM
Born in Dorset, raised in London, lived all over England, settled in Devon...and 'gets my goat' is used all over. Oddly enough.

It is generational though rather than regional. He 'gets up my nose' has overtaken the goat in popularity.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif B.