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CarpeNoctem43
03-06-2007, 03:46 PM
Every so often I go back through the forums and revisit past threads - basically because I didn't read them the first time around.

Once in a while I run across a thread/post discussing turn radius; some poor soul wondering what the radius of plane X is and also wondering why this information isn't available, posted or otherwise determinable.

So I thought I would help a few fellows out by sharing the knowledge that it seems so hard to pry out of the brains of others.

I tried to find a post directly discussing this, but I didn't find one. But, if this is a repost - sorry everyone.

it's real simple - just remember distance = speed * time. Just because the distance travelled happens to not be a straight line but rather a circle - doesn't change a thing.

Once you have distance rename it to 'perimeter' because, travelling in a circle, this distance covers the perimeter of said circle.

To find the radius divide the perimeter by 2PI. Bingo! turn radius.

To clean it up:
V = speed (in units per second)
t = time (in seconds)
P = Perimeter (in units)
R = Radius (in units)
PI = 3.14159.....

R = P / 2PI
P = Vt

I know this isn't rocket science - but hopefully it'll assist some in their quest for further understanding.

So, everyone get out your spreadsheets, refer to IL-2 Compare and see if you can find some interesting numbers.


Best regards,

Rick


PS. I denoted 'units' as it doesn't matter what you use as long as you understand that the result will be in those units. Maybe someone will like to try maybe furlongs per fortnight?

CarpeNoctem43
03-06-2007, 03:46 PM
Every so often I go back through the forums and revisit past threads - basically because I didn't read them the first time around.

Once in a while I run across a thread/post discussing turn radius; some poor soul wondering what the radius of plane X is and also wondering why this information isn't available, posted or otherwise determinable.

So I thought I would help a few fellows out by sharing the knowledge that it seems so hard to pry out of the brains of others.

I tried to find a post directly discussing this, but I didn't find one. But, if this is a repost - sorry everyone.

it's real simple - just remember distance = speed * time. Just because the distance travelled happens to not be a straight line but rather a circle - doesn't change a thing.

Once you have distance rename it to 'perimeter' because, travelling in a circle, this distance covers the perimeter of said circle.

To find the radius divide the perimeter by 2PI. Bingo! turn radius.

To clean it up:
V = speed (in units per second)
t = time (in seconds)
P = Perimeter (in units)
R = Radius (in units)
PI = 3.14159.....

R = P / 2PI
P = Vt

I know this isn't rocket science - but hopefully it'll assist some in their quest for further understanding.

So, everyone get out your spreadsheets, refer to IL-2 Compare and see if you can find some interesting numbers.


Best regards,

Rick


PS. I denoted 'units' as it doesn't matter what you use as long as you understand that the result will be in those units. Maybe someone will like to try maybe furlongs per fortnight?