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View Full Version : Fast attack sub ran aground



Nero111
02-16-2005, 08:18 AM
You guys see this,
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>050127-N-4658L-030 Apra Harbor, Guam (Jan. 27, 2005) - The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS San Francisco (SSN 711) in dry dock to assess damage sustained after running aground approximately 350 miles south of Guam Jan. 8, 2005. The Navy former dry dock known as €œBig Blue€ is capable of docking ships that weigh up to 40,000 Long Tons. The Navy certified Big Blue for the one-time docking of San Francisco. San Francisco is the second fast-attack submarine to be attached to the forward-deployed Submarine Squadron Fifteen, home ported on board Naval Base Guam. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The images are massive, made a smaller one for show.
http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=21183
http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=21182
http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/photos/050127-N-4658L-015.jpg
http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/photos/050127-N-4658L-030.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v507/bakgat/subby.jpg

Nero111
02-16-2005, 08:18 AM
You guys see this,
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>050127-N-4658L-030 Apra Harbor, Guam (Jan. 27, 2005) - The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS San Francisco (SSN 711) in dry dock to assess damage sustained after running aground approximately 350 miles south of Guam Jan. 8, 2005. The Navy former dry dock known as €œBig Blue€ is capable of docking ships that weigh up to 40,000 Long Tons. The Navy certified Big Blue for the one-time docking of San Francisco. San Francisco is the second fast-attack submarine to be attached to the forward-deployed Submarine Squadron Fifteen, home ported on board Naval Base Guam. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The images are massive, made a smaller one for show.
http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=21183
http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=21182
http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/photos/050127-N-4658L-015.jpg
http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/photos/050127-N-4658L-030.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v507/bakgat/subby.jpg

eddie_wood
02-16-2005, 08:54 AM
Is it a silly question to ask how a modern sub ran aground?

Ed.

Drebbel
02-16-2005, 09:15 AM
caused by out dated maps !

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Franzen
02-16-2005, 09:46 AM
The new maps will be available March 18th. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fritz Franzen

HeibgesU999
02-16-2005, 12:34 PM
I believe the commander's Letter of Reprimand, attached permantly to his file and which is ending his career, will say lack of judgement and not outdated maps.

Nero111
02-16-2005, 12:58 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Accidents like this are rare, but there will probably be a review of the charts, of underwater geography, that are used by American subs. This review process is standard whenever there is a major underwater earthquake or volcano eruption. For example, the December 26, 2004 earthquake off Aceh is known to have seriously rearranged the ocean bottom in that area, and efforts are already underway to update charts. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
SOURCE (http://www.strategypage.com/search.asp?target=c:\inetpub\strategypageroot\dls\ docs\200513123.htm&search=San%20Francisco)

banzai_alex
02-16-2005, 02:45 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Nero111:
You guys see this,
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>050127-N-4658L-030 Apra Harbor, Guam (Jan. 27, 2005) - The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS San Francisco (SSN 711) in dry dock to assess damage sustained after running aground approximately 350 miles south of Guam Jan. 8, 2005. The Navy former dry dock known as €œBig Blue€ is capable of docking ships that weigh up to 40,000 Long Tons. The Navy certified Big Blue for the one-time docking of San Francisco. San Francisco is the second fast-attack submarine to be attached to the forward-deployed Submarine Squadron Fifteen, home ported on board Naval Base Guam. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The images are massive, made a smaller one for show.
http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=21183
http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=21182
http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/photos/050127-N-4658L-015.jpg
http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/photos/050127-N-4658L-030.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v507/bakgat/subby.jpg <HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Isnt stuff like this classified?!?

Franzen
02-16-2005, 10:46 PM
But aren't we classified? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Sorry, my mistake, I was thinking "certified" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz Franzen

archer49d
02-19-2005, 03:54 PM
Classified... no, you'll notice every image there has been "Released". I still can't figure out why the guy was pushing 32 kn in that area.

Copperhead_SG
02-19-2005, 05:35 PM
Remember the novel and the movie "The Hunt For Red October" where the SSBN navigated through an underwater mountain range with only a map and a stopwatch? Same thing here.

I doubt the commander would put his boat, crew and himself into unnecessary risk by running blind at flank speed at more than 500 feet of ocean unless it is crucial to the mission objectives.

Unfortunately, it is the commander's discretion as to how he should complete the mission so if it screws up, he has to take the responsibility for it.

Sad.