PDA

View Full Version : I'd never heard of these kamikaze's before



Oilburner_TAW
04-22-2005, 06:36 PM
I've been watching DVD 3 of "The Corsair Experience". Something I had never heard of that some of these pilots where talking about was the Japanese would fill a Betty bomber full of assault troops and do a wheels up landing at an Allied base at night (wheels up so it would stop faster I guess, they didn't explain why). Troops would pour out and run around trying to destroy as much aircraft and equipment as possible. One of the pilot's interviewed said that it sounded crazy but was an extremely effective tactic taking his group down from 20 flyable aircraft to 6 in just one night's raid.


Something else I heard that I identified with was another pilot saying that when their carrier had been attacked he had to land on another carrier. As soon as he landed they pushed his plane overboard because there was no room to put his (or his squadron mates) planes on the ship and there will still planes in the holding pattern. He was extremely mad because he was the only one in his squadron with a F4U-1C (4x20mm) and he knew he would never get one again (and he really liked the 4 20mm's http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif ).

Oilburner_TAW
04-22-2005, 06:36 PM
I've been watching DVD 3 of "The Corsair Experience". Something I had never heard of that some of these pilots where talking about was the Japanese would fill a Betty bomber full of assault troops and do a wheels up landing at an Allied base at night (wheels up so it would stop faster I guess, they didn't explain why). Troops would pour out and run around trying to destroy as much aircraft and equipment as possible. One of the pilot's interviewed said that it sounded crazy but was an extremely effective tactic taking his group down from 20 flyable aircraft to 6 in just one night's raid.


Something else I heard that I identified with was another pilot saying that when their carrier had been attacked he had to land on another carrier. As soon as he landed they pushed his plane overboard because there was no room to put his (or his squadron mates) planes on the ship and there will still planes in the holding pattern. He was extremely mad because he was the only one in his squadron with a F4U-1C (4x20mm) and he knew he would never get one again (and he really liked the 4 20mm's http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif ).

SkyChimp
04-22-2005, 06:51 PM
Yes. Can you imagine?

These Japanese commandos tried this at Okinawa, landing a bomber at a US airbase. The commandos, either strapped with explosives or carrying satchel charges, blew up something like 30 planes.

I've got a picture of a Japanese bomber that pulled this off in one of my books. The commandos simply went out the nose of the plane.

Edit: I was trying to find a picture on the net, but couldn't. Did find this famous photo of night AA photo during Okinawa:

http://www.nps.gov/wapa/indepth/extContent/usmc/pcn-190-003135-00/images/fig28.jpg

Seahawk89
04-22-2005, 07:23 PM
Here is some info. I'm working on a co-op mission about it. Good reminder for me to go finish it.
http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USA/USA-P-Okinawa/USA-P-Okinawa-14.html

Mr_Nakajima
04-23-2005, 02:27 AM
There is quite a bit about a similar plan in 'Mitsubishi Type 1 Rikko 'Betty' Units of World War 2' by Osamu Tagaya, published by Osprey, ISBN 1-84176-082-X.

Ten modified Ki-21 'Sally' bombers flew in the suicide squads to Okinawa in May 1945, and the results were considered successful enough for the IJN to try something similar.

Operation Tsurugi (sword) was originally planned to use 20 G4Ms which would crash-land on the B-29 bases on the Marianas and disgorge navy commandos who would destroy as many B-29s as possible before being killed. Some of the G4Ms had their top turrets removed and plated over in preparation.

Preparation was elaborate. The commandos trained using full-scale mock-ups of B-29s and captured Superfortress crews interrogated for any useful information on the bases. All crew and troops would have been dressed in American uniforms.

The mission was planned for July but delayed due to losses among the aircraft. Re-arranged for August, even more G4Ms were added to the plan, army commandos joined in, and added to the plan was the hijacking a B-29 and flying it to Japan! A crashed B-29 from Nagoya had given them a complete B-29 flight manual and the Japanese thought they could capture one.

The final plan called for 60 G4Ms transporting 300 navy commandos of the 101st Kure SNLF and 300 army commandos of the 1st Raiding regiment. The navy would hit Guam with 20 G4Ms, the army Saipan with 20, and a joint force of 20 would strike Saipan.

The operation was planned for 19-23 August 1945, so Japan's surrender stopped it from taking place.