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Breeze147
01-24-2008, 08:33 AM
http://www.historynet.com/magazines/world_war_2/13835657.html

thefruitbat
01-24-2008, 09:46 AM
Interesting read http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

One question, am i right in recalling that the British were operating of carriers before the US. If so why didnt they share, and did they have different solutions?

cheers fruitbat

Agnrysteel
01-24-2008, 10:22 AM
Good Read, very interesting. thank you

horseback
01-24-2008, 12:41 PM
Originally posted by thefruitbat:
Interesting read http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

One question, am i right in recalling that the British were operating of carriers before the US. If so why didnt they share, and did they have different solutions?

cheers fruitbat The Fleet Air Arm was operating Corsairs off carriers somewhat sooner, but except for the classic curved carrier approach they came up with, the bulk of the Corsair's carrier problems were solved by the end of VF-17's carrier qualifications on the ESSEX.

The problem was that these fixes took more time to be made known to the 'worlds' of Naval Logistics Command and the various Navy Aeronautical bureaucracies, approved, and then sent back to the Vought and Goodyear plants building new Corsairs so that they could be implemented than it would to switch over to the Hellcat, which was relatively benign in its landing charactoristics and nearly as lethal to the enemy.

The Hellcat already had a long-established and extremely efficient supply line in place, while Vought's system was not yet up and running.

While much is made of the great manufacturing and training war machine the United States became for the Allies, the fact is that for at least the first 18 months after our entry in the war, we were very poorly organized, with competing demands for resources often resulting in priorities being set on a political basis, rather than military needs.

When you consider that the two most 'advanced' fighters the US had available on December 7th 1941 were the Corsair and the P-38, it seems odd that these two fighters were the ones with the most troubles getting to the front in useful numbers, until you think about how many people were probably trying to 'help' at the worst possible times.

cheers

horseback

Loco-S
01-24-2008, 01:35 PM
"advanced" doesnt mean "reliable" or "serviceable"..you can have the most advanced piece of equipment, but if you can not maintain it/service/repair/spare parts available, etc...you have only that: "advanced"

HayateAce
01-24-2008, 03:35 PM
Originally posted by Loco-S:
"advanced" doesnt mean "reliable" or "serviceable"..you can have the most advanced piece of equipment, but if you can not maintain it/service/repair/spare parts available, etc...you have only that: "advanced"

Agree 100%.

http://www.panzerworld.net/pictures/00144.jpg

stansdds
01-25-2008, 04:51 AM
Reliability was a problem for the F4U-1, especially once it was assigned to land duty. The coral grit played havoc with the Corsair and squadrons operating during 1943 often had barely half of their F4U-1's available for duty at any given time. Once training improved, the spare parts supply increased and chronic problems were solved, the Corsair became a reliable, first rate fighter.

woofiedog
01-25-2008, 06:54 AM
Excellent article... Thank's for posting.

http://www.airgroup4.com/guadalcanal-2.jpg
VMF-124 on Guadalcanal - February 1943.[notice to old style canopy.]

Quote... NACA had only just begun to explore the problems of compressible flow, and it was as much art as science at this point. (Not until the 1970s and the advent of supercomputers were the complete, nonsimplified equations for compressible flow cracked mathematically.)

No wonder that the piston & jet aircraft of the time capable of coming close to the speed of sound or passing it were giving pilots and designer's compression problems. Interesting note.

Quote... Corsairs dropped 70 percent of all the bombs dropped by American fighters in the war.

Quite the achievement for an aircraft that came late into the war.

And one last quote that speaks for it's self...

Perhaps the most objective assessment of the Corsair was at the Joint Fighter Conference at Patuxent River, Maryland, in October 1944. Nearly a hundred army and navy pilots swapped cockpits and compared notes. When the results were tallied, the F4U stood tall. Best all-round fighter below 25,000 feet: Bearcat, Mustang, and Corsair, all within 3 percent of one other. Best above 25,000: the P-47 got nearly half the votes followed by the Mustang and F4U in distant third. Perhaps most surprisingly, in the best fighter-bomber category the Corsair led the P-47 nearly two to one. Additionally, the F4U ranked second only to the P-47 as best strafer.

By the way... did any of you take the test? Had two wrong over all and should have known the correct answer to one of them. One other was a little more tricky to get.

Test Your Knowledge: World War II in the Pacific (http://www.historynet.com/history_quizzes/7690812.html)

mortoma
01-25-2008, 07:47 PM
I'll have to read this when I get more time. In the middle of my 12 hour shift week!! I wonder if the real Corsair wobbled all over the place like the IL2 version does. I had to go back to early war scenarios flying the Wildcat because I am tired of the wobbly Sair and Hellcats. Nice to be back in the Wildcat because now I can hit Zekes again with my guns. Much more stable gun platform!!!